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SarahBell

It's A Beach Hut

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That was where the SS Napoli was wrecked. Entertaining to watch the following from your verandah...

Sadly, ‘NAPOLI’ will always evoke the scenes and reports of the looting mayhem played out on

the beach at Branscombe in East Devon, from the 21st to the 23rd January. They were vividly

portrayed to the world by the media whose main players cannot escape their responsibility for

promoting its worst excesses. That display of one of the lower states of the human condition was

in stark contrast to the bravery and skill shown before it, and at the opposite end of that moral

spectrum.

Edited by juvenal

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No, it's a 'Chalet'!!!!! :lol:

Any bank which provides the morgage for that deserves to go bankrupt. And the guilty banker should be forced to swim in our sewage system before being eaten alive by rats.

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I stayed there for a week in 1985 with my grandparents. I wonder what they yield?

Well, 3%, evidently, after you take out council tax.

--------------------------------------------------

From The Sunday Times

March 30, 2003

Living: Devon beach hut bonanza

Other areas of the property market may be down, but 18 wooden chalets on the south Devon coast will have buyers competing to pay £100,000 each, says Fred Redwood

Beach chalets may press all the right nostalgia buttons but would you pay £100,000 for one? That is the dilemma facing Philip Trenchard of Stroud, Gloucestershire, who is considering buying one of the 18 sea shanties for sale at Branscombe in east Devon.

“It’s worth it to pass on the pleasures of a traditional seaside holiday to another generation,” he says. “I came here as a child in the early 1960s and I now bring my own kids. They love the same boat trips run by old John the fisherman. We catch mackerel, play beach games and walk the National Trust coastal path, then we sleep to the sound of the sea dragging the pebble beach.”

But isn’t the price of a starter home in suburbia a bit much to pay for winter storage for the crab lines and cricket bats — particularly as there are also annual management charges of £1,000 and council rates to be paid? East Devon district council sets a rateable value of £900 if the chalets are made available for holiday hire for at least 140 days a year each. If let for a shorter period or not at all, they will have a council tax “A” band of £740.38. “Figures prove rental income on the chalets averages over £8,500 for 28 weeks of lettings,” claims owner Anthony Sellick, who is selling the chalets and retiring.

“You can actually live in these chalets provided they are only used as ‘holiday accommodation’. They are made of cedar and come with full surveyors’ reports. You buy the 99-year lease in a fantastic location, directly above the National Trust beach where no further building will be allowed.”

In fact, the price of the shanties is in line with other beach chalets around the British coast. One was sold at West Bexington, near Chesil Beach, Dorset, for £120,000 last November and a hut measuring just 11ft by 12ft, in which overnight stays are prohibited, was sold for £45,000 recently at Southwold, Suffolk.

The chalets at Branscombe are in an idyllic location. The village is pure Enid Blyton, with its church, blacksmith, thatched bakery and tearooms. The road struggles down to the pebble beach, where there is a cafe and a path, used by walkers, tapering up to the cliffs. Michael Foot, the former Labour party leader, used to be a frequent visitor.

On the toe of the cliffs, there are the chalets. You can drive to some, but those that are inaccessible by car are more highly prized by solitude-seeking chalet regulars.

All the chalets have electric lights and heating, immersion heaters for hot water and propane gas for cooking. There is a small kitchen to the left of the side entrance, bathroom to the right, two smallish bedrooms ahead, in the middle a communal space to play board games when it rains, and to the left a verandah. Here you are buying into the stress-free simple life: a back-to-basics nirvana where you won’t get a signal on your mobile phone unless you perch on a distant rock, and where it’s questionable whether you will get reception for a portable television.

You also buy into a select holiday community. Branscombe is the Mustique of the beach chalet world — a beachcomber’s sea haven to rank beside the Suffolk resorts and Mudeford in Dorset. Families have returned here for the same summer weeks for generations, and even more basic huts have been on the same strip of land since 1918. However, the present crop of cedarwood chalets was built in 1984. How are they viewed by the aficionados? “They have far better amenities, including carpets, but I still hanker after the old huts,” says Trenchard. “Built of dark wood, they looked like miniature cricket pavilions and there was something romantic about the sight of their gas lamps shining at night. They also had those evocative smells of sun-scorched linoleum, damp bathing costumes and fish-paste sandwiches.”

Since regular lettees were informed that the shanties at Branscombe were to be sold, 420 requests for information have been received.

The chalets, priced between £90,000 and £125,000, are available through John Wood (01297 20290, www.johnwood.co.uk)

Testing the waters

For sales, lets and news on huts, visit www.beach-huts.co.uk

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Branscombe is the Mustique of the beach chalet world

AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH hurrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr gasp gasp...

deep breath....AHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA urgh *collapses*.

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To be fair they're worth whatever someone is willing to pay. It's a unique location so I can understand someone with the cash buying it like they would a painting, vintage wine or car.

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To be fair they're worth whatever someone is willing to pay. It's a unique location so I can understand someone with the cash buying it like they would a painting, vintage wine or car.

Except that the ownership of a painting, a car or a bottle of wine doesn't represent a restriction upon others.

The reason this shed is £250k is because it presents a unique opportunity to profit from the reduction in liberty of others, that's what drives the boom.

Edited by Chef

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To be fair they're worth whatever someone is willing to pay. It's a unique location so I can understand someone with the cash buying it like they would a painting, vintage wine or car.

Yep, leaving aside the ridiculous price, I would love to live there.

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Crystal ball Sarah Bell....the Branscombe beach huts have all but been washed into the sea...the council have abandoned any hope of saving them. Today on radio 4 the owners (some of whom are now facing bankruptcy/ nervous breakdowns) were featured on radio 4.

Edited by crashmonitor

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Crystal ball Sarah Bell....the Branscombe beach huts have been all but been washed into the sea...the council have abandoned any hope of saving them. Today on radio 4 the owners (some of whom are now facing bankruptcy) were featured on radio 4. Many are going through nervous breakdowns.

Mwahahahahahaahha - Good!

You can't lose with beach huts!

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Crazy isn't it. But no crazier than the sailing world.

I've got a boat moored in a Solent marina, many of my neighbours never take their boats out to sea. They come down from London on a Friday night and stay on their boats until lunchtime on Sunday then go back home. I asked one guy why he'd spent several £k on radar and a top of the range chart plotter when he never leaves his marina berth, he replied the boat just wouldn't feel right without them. There's another guy with a boat that must be worth half a mill, he sleeps on it but never actually goes anywhere, he says he doesn't feel confident to get her in and out of her berth, so just potters around the estuary in an inflatable dinghy and outboard.

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love this quote

Some of the chalet owners are not wealthy - they have mortgages on their chalets and depend on the income from letting them out in the summer.

can you get a mortgage on a 'shack' ?

these are second homes and the 'owners' are operating a BTL business if they have not bought them outright.

two of these 'shacks' are on rightmove for £250K but look as if the shingle is still in front of them - I am confused.

apparently these rent out for £59 per night - so I suppose even with a £1300 pa and risinf maintenance charge it is a better return than a savings account.

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Crystal ball Sarah Bell....the Branscombe beach huts have all but been washed into the sea...the council have abandoned any hope of saving them. Today on radio 4 the owners (some of whom are now facing bankruptcy/ nervous breakdowns) were featured on radio 4.

Eh, I wouldn't buy a beach hut so that it could affect my financial stability if it ever was washed away?

When the tide goes out, you know who isn't wearing any swim wear!

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  • 149 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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