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Album Price 'should Drop To £1'

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-11547279

The price of music albums should be slashed to around £1, a former major record label boss has suggested.
Rob Dickins, who ran Warner Music in the UK for 15 years, said "radically" lowering prices would help beat piracy and lead to an exponential sales rise.
"What we need is a revolution. What we've got is an erosion. When I was running Warners, a chart CD could be £12.99. A chart CD now can be £6.99, maybe even £5.99."
Some major album downloads currently sell for as little as £3.99 through retailers such as Amazon.
If record labels made the decision to charge much less, fans would not think twice about buying an album on impulse and the resulting sales boost would make up for the price drop, he predicted.

Finally, someone gets it.

I stopped buying CDs a long time ago and switched my purchasing to the industry's arch-nemeses because prices are still far too high.

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Disposable music needs a disposable price tag.

But then, I don’t think he does get it, he's still trying to sell an Album.

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i still buy secondhand records off discogs , you can get most of the stuff i play for .50 - 5 pound

haven't bought a cd for feckin yeeeears it's all pop manufactured garbage now , even if they dropped the price of a new album to 10p i wouldnt buy any of them

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Jonathan Shalit, who discovered Charlotte Church and manages N Dubz and Russell Watson, described it as a "totally ridiculous suggestion".

"Right now if you buy a bottle of water it's £1," he said. "A piece of music is a valuable form of art. If you want the person to respect it and value it, it's got to cost them not a huge sum of money but a significant sum of money."

He, on the other hand, doesn't get it.

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"Right now if you buy a bottle of water it's £1," he said. "A piece of music is a valuable form of art. If you want the person to respect it and value it, it's got to cost them not a huge sum of money but a significant sum of money."

I could say that much modern music has a lot in common with the bottle of water. You buy it and then realise it's going to be p*ss.

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You're missing his real point. This is about killing off indie labels so the majors have even more control. Indie labels cannot survive selling albums for £1.

Saying albums should be £1 is like arguing pubs should sell pints for 1p.

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You're missing his real point. This is about killing off indie labels so the majors have even more control. Indie labels cannot survive selling albums for £1.

Saying albums should be £1 is like arguing pubs should sell pints for 1p.

To be honest, I think he's missing the point. The model is dead. Pricing will not change that.

A dozen or so tracks, typically from a single artist, with back catalogue sales driving revenue.

Talking to a guy I know who works in the industry and the artists they are dropping are named brands, whose back catalogue sales at Christmas more or less fund them. People just aren't buying these anymore. Newer / Chart artists are less of an issue, as there are still plenty of revenue streams with merchandising, ring tones, etc…

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You're missing his real point. This is about killing off indie labels so the majors have even more control. Indie labels cannot survive selling albums for £1.

Saying albums should be £1 is like arguing pubs should sell pints for 1p.

Yep, although with the indie market, you will always have fans that will pay 6/7/10 quid for an album, no matter what, however, their market share would certainly decrease. I'd say £1 for some Shite factor karaoke pub singer is still far far too much...Even giving them away with a packet of Wotsits is too much..

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Newer / Chart artists are less of an issue, as there are still plenty of revenue streams with merchandising, ring tones, etc…

The ring tones is something I find very interesting from a commercial perspective. People whine about paying £4 for an album yet they'll pay £3 for ONE ringtone. Very very odd imo.

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He, on the other hand, doesn't get it.

Exactly - coz their market has boomed exponentially around the World they still expect to rake and charge the crazy prices they could get away with in the past with smaller audiences - bloody dinosaur companies!

The record companies are the ones who rip-off their signed up artists anyway!

I agree - they don't "get it" and people have loads of other tat they would rather spend their hard earned on nowadays!

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The record companies are the ones who rip-off their signed up artists anyway!

Sorry but that's simply not true. You have to think about what's involved when you sign to a label. They're not only giving you an interest free loan to record/distribute/promote your music but you're hiring a team of people with the contacts you need to effectively promote your band. Labels take on a huge risk when they sign a band because there are many acts that are signed that either flop or don't even record the album due to problems kicking in with the band once they're signed and this is all done at a loss.

Yes some labels are very unscrupulous but so are some businesses.

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The ring tones is something I find very interesting from a commercial perspective. People whine about paying £4 for an album yet they'll pay £3 for ONE ringtone. Very very odd imo.

I don't know anybody who would admit to that!

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The ring tones is something I find very interesting from a commercial perspective. People whine about paying £4 for an album yet they'll pay £3 for ONE ringtone. Very very odd imo.

For ringtones, I edit the audio file I want myself. Which takes a few minutes. Some people don't have the skill or don't want to spend the time.

An album I can get for free in 5 minutes - even quicker than buying it!

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The ring tones is something I find very interesting from a commercial perspective. People whine about paying £4 for an album yet they'll pay £3 for ONE ringtone. Very very odd imo.

Especially novelty records, such as the Crazy Frog...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crazy_Frog A very interesting marketing model. I heard it on some twerps phone this morning...god its crap...

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Most of the discs I buy these days are SACD as I really love music. They sound awsome (provided you have a decent player).

Listen to your favourite record in SACD (if available) and you'll know what I'm talking about.

I only do mp3s for running or kitchen whilst cooking.

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For ringtones, I edit the audio file I want myself. Which takes a few minutes. Some people don't have the skill or don't want to spend the time.

An album I can get for free in 5 minutes - even quicker than buying it!

Sure you can get albums them for free. I prefer paying because I'm not into torrents - some of the places you end up at feel scuzzy and with kids getting on the computer I just want to be careful.

I pay about $2 for an album, which is like, £1.30. I'm perfectly happy to pay that. So basically he's realised that resistance is futile and he's prepared to fall into line with the likes of the russian operators.

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The ring tones is something I find very interesting from a commercial perspective. People whine about paying £4 for an album yet they'll pay £3 for ONE ringtone. Very very odd imo.

Different product, different market. The point is the type of people who buy ring tones, don't want albums, so they don't see value in them, so complain they are too expensive. For them it's not 1 track for 3£ or 10 for 7£. A ring tone is a branding, fashion item, not a music item. A very cheap, disposable fashion, possibly even sub-culture, statement. A CD album doesn't do that.

I think ring tones really are a clue to the future of the music industry, I just don't think anyone has really figured out to fully capture it or monetise it yet though. Too many people are still trapped with the idea of selling a product, and they need to figure out how to sell a service. Honestly think the best approach would be to look at the online gaming industry.

Develop an all you can eat subscription service, very low cost basic service giving low level access to a massive amount of back catalogue material. The value add, the profit centre comes from the premium content, either new releases from very high profile artists, or completely discretionary items, the same way online games sell purely cosmetic digital gaming content.

You want a branded artists latest release a week before general release, you pay a premium. Want an extended remix from some hot DJ, you pay a premium, want a band branded iphone scrobing app, you pay a premium, want concert tickets a day before general release, pay a premium.

People will pay this sort of stuff as a status/fashion symbol. Of course it all needs marketing correctly.

People are getting the content for free now, that genie is out of the bottle, and it ain't ever going back. The industry has to sell something else, a branded wrapper around the content.

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Sure you can get albums them for free. I prefer paying because I'm not into torrents - some of the places you end up at feel scuzzy and with kids getting on the computer I just want to be careful.

I pay about $2 for an album, which is like, £1.30. I'm perfectly happy to pay that. So basically he's realised that resistance is futile and he's prepared to fall into line with the likes of the russian operators.

I'd be interested to know where you get them from, as that's a very fair price, I agree.

I had been using Tesco downloads, or Wal-Mart in the USA (thugh they are limited in their range).

Ta!

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Sure you can get albums them for free. I prefer paying because I'm not into torrents - some of the places you end up at feel scuzzy and with kids getting on the computer I just want to be careful.

I pay about $2 for an album, which is like, £1.30. I'm perfectly happy to pay that. So basically he's realised that resistance is futile and he's prepared to fall into line with the likes of the russian operators.

Is it a Russian site?

There's a lot of MP3 blogs out there, and there's sites such as pitchfork.com and hypem.com that have taster tracks..

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Different product, different market. The point is the type of people who buy ring tones, don't want albums, so they don't see value in them, so complain they are too expensive. For them it's not 1 track for 3£ or 10 for 7£. A ring tone is a branding, fashion item, not a music item. A very cheap, disposable fashion, possibly even sub-culture, statement. A CD album doesn't do that.

I think ring tones really are a clue to the future of the music industry, I just don't think anyone has really figured out to fully capture it or monetise it yet though. Too many people are still trapped with the idea of selling a product, and they need to figure out how to sell a service. Honestly think the best approach would be to look at the online gaming industry.

Develop an all you can eat subscription service, very low cost basic service giving low level access to a massive amount of back catalogue material. The value add, the profit centre comes from the premium content, either new releases from very high profile artists, or completely discretionary items, the same way online games sell purely cosmetic digital gaming content.

You want a branded artists latest release a week before general release, you pay a premium. Want an extended remix from some hot DJ, you pay a premium, want a band branded iphone scrobing app, you pay a premium, want concert tickets a day before general release, pay a premium.

People will pay this sort of stuff as a status/fashion symbol. Of course it all needs marketing correctly.

People are getting the content for free now, that genie is out of the bottle, and it ain't ever going back. The industry has to sell something else, a branded wrapper around the content.

Young people buy ringtones. They don't buy albums.

Here's why: young people don't have credit cards. That means young people can't open or operate accounts on the internet.

A ringtone gets charged to your prepaid balance. Up until fairly recently, if you wanted to buy an album you had to have an account with say, Amazon or Play.com. Apple got around this by creating iTunes gift cards, because whatever you think of them, they are hip to their audience. The major labels simply hadn't figured this out. Napster was created by a teenager who wanted get around the problem of not having the necessary purchasing power.

It's all too late now for the majors, of course.

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The horse has bolted. There's nothing the industry can do to reverse the trend to digital music. I think all we'll have in future are dull X-factor level singer sponsored by corporations.

Paying to hear music is dying. Bands that might once have spent a few years on the toilet circuit and released a couple of albums will be strictly hobbyist.

'Yeah, but I paid to see some gigs last year!'

Bands don't make much form touring. Tours are to sell albums.

There's no such thing as indie music anymore, just fashionable haircuts selling product for corporations with an 'indie' flavour.

Like this:

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The horse has bolted. There's nothing the industry can do to reverse the trend to digital music. I think all we'll have in future are dull X-factor level singer sponsored by corporations.

You are so ,so wrong. The availability of non industry has exploded, and its all down to the tech.

I use lastfm, have done for a couple of years and have my profile / library set up so I don't get anything i'm not interested in, unless I go wondering. Couple of months ago had an invite from someone in my neighbourhood, so I check out what they're listening too and it turns out they have 3 of their own tracks for download.

Now I know we have similar tastes, they're in my neighbourhood, so this isn't just some random “hey what do you think of my band” crap. so I listen, I like, I add. I may even go see them in a few weeks time.

They're not signed. They're offering their content for free, to people who have similar tastes. They're never going to be mainstream, just not that type of music. Without lastfm, I would have never heard their material.

My lastfm library currently has 814 Artists in it, and it's constantly growing. I guess around 2/3 rds I hadn't heard before created an account and for most of those, i don't see how i would have heard them otherwise.

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You are so ,so wrong. The availability of non industry has exploded, and its all down to the tech.

I use lastfm, have done for a couple of years and have my profile / library set up so I don't get anything i'm not interested in, unless I go wondering. Couple of months ago had an invite from someone in my neighbourhood, so I check out what they're listening too and it turns out they have 3 of their own tracks for download.

Now I know we have similar tastes, they're in my neighbourhood, so this isn't just some random “hey what do you think of my band” crap. so I listen, I like, I add. I may even go see them in a few weeks time.

They're not signed. They're offering their content for free, to people who have similar tastes. They're never going to be mainstream, just not that type of music. Without lastfm, I would have never heard their material.

My lastfm library currently has 814 Artists in it, and it's constantly growing. I guess around 2/3 rds I hadn't heard before created an account and for most of those, i don't see how i would have heard them otherwise.

It's so sad that so very few of 'web-listeners' care about the quality of the audio they listen to...

Come on, let's face it, the quality of most online streams (~128 kbps) is unbearable. People who listened to vinyl LPs in the 70s were getting much better quality of the audio signal... Where is the progress I ask???

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Most of the discs I buy these days are SACD as I really love music. They sound awsome (provided you have a decent player).

Listen to your favourite record in SACD (if available) and you'll know what I'm talking about.

I only do mp3s for running or kitchen whilst cooking.

didn't they try DVD-audio albums for a while?

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It's so sad that so very few of 'web-listeners' care about the quality of the audio they listen to...

Come on, let's face it, the quality of most online streams (~128 kbps) is unbearable. People who listened to vinyl LPs in the 70s were getting much better quality of the audio signal... Where is the progress I ask???

Pedantic concerns about audio quality _completely_ miss the point. It's the music that matters, not whether there's hiss or crackle.

One of the most exciting musical experiences I ever had was listening to a 10th generation cassette bootleg live Prince recording of Red House at an after-gig show in Paris when I was 14.

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  • 144 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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