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British Gas Price Increases

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No doubt you've read today that British Gas are putting both Gas/Electric prices up 14%, on the 6 o'clock news (;)) they stated the average gas bill for 2003 was £373 and will now be £515, so that's 38% inflation in less than two years for gas alone.

If that's what happends when inflation is officially running in the 1-2% range I'd love to know what happends if it hits 2.5 - 3%.

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No doubt you've read today that British Gas are putting both Gas/Electric prices up 14%, on the 6 o'clock news (;)) they stated the average gas bill for 2003 was £373 and will now be £515, so that's 38% inflation in less than two years for gas alone.

If that's what happends when inflation is officially running in the 1-2% range I'd love to know what happends if it hits 2.5 - 3%.

They were canvassing our area last night. Wouldn't you be gutted if you'd just signed up? Time to use the 'cooling off period' clause I think and do some shopping around.

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Guest Alright Jack
No doubt you've read today that British Gas are putting both Gas/Electric prices up 14%, on the 6 o'clock news (;)) they stated the average gas bill for 2003 was £373 and will now be £515, so that's 38% inflation in less than two years for gas alone.

If that's what happends when inflation is officially running in the 1-2% range I'd love to know what happends if it hits 2.5 - 3%.

Prices affect CPI not vice versa. I am not sure what you are saying.

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Prices affect CPI not vice versa. I am not sure what you are saying.

The only thing that seems to affect the CPI is the cost of DVD players when you look at its weightings, seasonal adjustments and exclusions. Things like house prices, mortgage costs and council tax aren't counted.

If they've successfully targeted inflation at 2% and utilities and service sector prices have raced ahead, what does that say about their yardstick and their actual ability to control inflation?

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The only thing that seems to affect the CPI is the cost of DVD players when you look at its weightings, seasonal adjustments and exclusions. Things like house prices, mortgage costs and council tax aren't counted.

If they've successfully targeted inflation at 2% and utilities and service sector prices have raced ahead, what does that say about their yardstick and their actual ability to control inflation?

But there's no hiding place for real inflation. It's the pound in your pocket and all that.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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