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Quango List Shows 192 To Be Axed

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from the beeb

The government has announced a huge cull of quangos in a move it says will improve accountability and cut costs.

It will axe 192 of the public bodies - such as the Film Council and the Audit Commission - while 118 will be merged.

The future of some bodies is still under consideration but 380 will definitely be kept, the list says.

The government reviewed 901 bodies - 679 quangos and 222 other statutory bodies.

Among those being abolished entirely are the Youth Justice Board for England and Wales, the Animal Welfare Advisory Committee and Cycling England.

Wine purchase advice

The quangos whose functions are being returned to Whitehall departments include the Disability Living Allowance/Attendance Allowance Advisory Board and the Appointments Commission.

Others, like the Zoos Forum, the Herbal Medicines Advisory Committee and the Air Quality Expert Group, will be replaced by "committees of experts".

The Olympic Park Legacy Company will have its functions transferred to London Mayor Boris Johnson.

The Government Hospitality Advisory Committee on the Purchase of Wines will also be abolished, but ministers are considering whether another body should continue its work.

Speaking in Parliament, Mr Byrne said he backed the idea of cutting the number of quangos, a process he said the previous Labour government had set in motion.

But he accused the government of changing its argument over why they should be axed when it became clear that costs associated with closing them would not lead to any savings and could cost money.

He dubbed Mr Maude "the most expensive butcher in the country".

'Irritating'

He said: "Labour had a plan for steadily saving £0.5bn by carefully closing 25% of quangos over the next few years.

"The Tories now need to tell us whether their desperation for headlines and faster cuts means the cost of closing quangos is actually bigger than the savings. And while they're at it, they should tell us whether their manifesto commitment for 20 new quangos is now on ice."

Mr Maude told MPs that money would be saved by axing the quangos, but he said the main reason for the cull had always been to improve accountability, by having decisions taken by ministers and local authorities where possible.

"What people find so irritating is the sense that there is this huge amount of activity incontinently set up, much of it by the last government, by bodies which are not in any way accountable - no one can be held accountable for what they do and that is what we are seeking to change," he told MPs.

He said some jobs would be lost at the bodies being axed and some of the functions they performed would cease to be carried out.

For those that remain, there would be greater transparency - including revealing top salaries - and more "financial rigour", he told MPs.

He told the BBC there was no "dogmatic" ban on any new quangos being set up, but he said too many of the arm's length bodies had been set up so ministers could "avoid taking decisions" or face difficult questions and he suggested there was much duplication of work by different bodies.

He said it was right to get the "broad" plans out - but it was still a "work in progress" as some bodies were still under review. In future every three years each remaining quango would be subject to a review, to see if it was still needed.

Retained

Many of the better-known organisations due to be abolished had already been announced by the government, while others were included in a list leaked to the BBC last month.

These include the UK Film Council, the Audit Commission, the Health Protection Agency, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority and eight regional development agencies.

Among those the list confirms will be retained are Acas, the Competition Appeals Tribunal, the Higher Education Funding Council for England, the Low Pay Commission, UK Trade International, the Charity Commission for England and Wales and the Committee on Standards in Public Life.

The list also confirms that the government intends to merge the Competition Commission with the Office of Fair Trading, Postcom and Ofcom will be merged as will the Gambling Commission and National Lottery Commission.

Unions reacted angrily to the announcement. Unite's joint general secretary, Tony Woodley said: "The fact that Cabinet Office Minister Francis Maude is unable to say how much will be saved and how many jobs will be affected by this cull shows the threadbare nature of the thinking behind these abolition plans."

And Paul Noon, of the civil service union Prospect, described the bill planned to bring the changes in as "a legislative hammer to smash public bodies which are doing valuable work in the public interest".

Full list of axed quango's here

bonfire of the quangos

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Some can go without causing a ripple.

Others will be replaced by Government Departments taking over the functions. That means more decisions needing Ministerial approval. Some of these will be contentious to special interest groups. Before long, Ministers will create arm's length boidies to make those decisions. In other words, they'll be back.

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Said on sky news tens of thousands of public sector workers facing the sack because of this!

Declaration: "I work in the private sector (and always have done) but have extensive experience of several small to medium quangos - industry expert providing advice on free basis (i.e. my companies time and expenses as we (the sector) fear they will screw stuff up badly if they don't get the advice)."

A large number of part time non execs will be getting the chop along with the quango CEOs etc but as they are transferring functions to Ministries / other quangos in a lot of cases I would only expect somewhere 1500 to 3500 full time job losses to be going directly from the quangos however the large number of jobs effectively funded by quangos @ 3rd parties could be going as always the indirectly losses could be the largest (for example Sport England does lots of grants for community type sports projects and the employees are employed by the local 3rd party).

So don't expect the savings to be huge even if the jobs that go are the high salary ones.

The interesting effect could be that it slows down the rate of increase in salary for higher level positions in both public and private sectors as there is more competition for the jobs, but this would take time...

Edited by koala_bear

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Don't the likes of the Forestry Commission and the Environmental Agency employ thousands of people?

Edit:

Yep, more than 3,000 in the Forestry Commission according to their site.

Edited by The Masked Tulip

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Don't the likes of the Forestry Commission and the Environmental Agency employ thousands of people?

Edit:

Yep, more than 3,000 in the Forestry Commission according to their site.

The list is a status list of the quangos they looked at not an axed list (that is a subset of this list).

Yes they do employ thousands but both are being retained and reformed (NOT axed) - read the list carefully!

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It gets worse. They're axing the Marshall Aid Commemoration Commission! :lol:

No they aren't-

The list is a status list of the quangos they looked at not an axed list (that is a subset of this list).

The Marshall Aid Commemoration Commission being retained (NOT axed) - read the list carefully!

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The Government Hospitality Advisory Committee on the Purchase of Wines will also be abolished, but ministers are considering whether another body should continue its work
.

Says it all really.

A case of sour grapes?

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I really do hope they get rid of the Carbon Trust and Energy Saving Trust. That would be great.

I was once going to work on a PR contract with the Forestry Commission. On £700 per day. That was in 2003. Crazy QUANGOS.

As for EST. They once sent me a pile of leaflets and I phoned them to ask what they were for. They asked my to distribute them to customers of my client. I asked whether they would cover postage (these were big leaflets!) - they said no - and they hadn't thought about that :lol::lol::lol:

Edited by gruffydd

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No they aren't-

The list is a status list of the quangos they looked at not an axed list (that is a subset of this list).

The Marshall Aid Commemoration Commission being retained (NOT axed) - read the list carefully!

Next time I will read the list more carefully.

sad-puppy.jpg

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I really do hope they get rid of the Carbon Trust and Energy Saving Trust. That would be great.

I was once going to work on a PR contract with the Forestry Commission. On £700 per day. That was in 2003. Crazy QUANGOS.

As for EST. They once sent me a pile of leaflets and I phoned them to ask what they were for. They asked my to distribute them to customers of my client. I asked whether they would cover postage (these were big leaflets!) - they said no - and they hadn't thought about that :lol::lol::lol:

http://www.businessgreen.com/business-green/news/2271521/defra-faces-brunt-quango-cuts

Not part of this review. You will have to wait until next week to find out.

Not a bad starter this, bring on the main course.

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The loss of Cycling England. How will we cope!

...And the Advisory committee on Organic standards is abolished!!

We will obviously all be terribly upset. They will have to make their morning tea at home, poor souls.

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Cycling England - £60million per year. What the hell for exactly :blink:

To cycle across England of course! Can be a very expensive passtime these days... particularly if you have to buy a house each time you stop.

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To cycle across England of course! Can be a very expensive passtime these days... particularly if you have to buy a house each time you stop.

Have you been in a cycling shop recently? You can't buy a pair of damned sunglasses for less than £90, I only went in for a chain link, looking around I nearly spouted a hernia looking at the overpriced paraphenalia. I'm not one of these guilt riddled born again greens, I only want a mode of transport FFS :P

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A wine quango? You lot are making this up! :unsure:

Yeah, us from the Wine Quango Quango are getting pretty worried. Still, at least we have our day jobs at the EU :ph34r:

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  • 145 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
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      • up 5%



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