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Injin

Half A Million Stage Fresh Demonstrations Around France

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/france/8059315/Half-a-million-stage-fresh-demonstrations-around-France.html

The French president's pension plan is becoming one of the biggest battles of his presidency, pitting him against unions which crushed a previous attempt to reform the system in 1995, but his administration is refusing to buckle under the pressure.

"We have reached the limit of the (concessions) that are possible," Francois Fillon, the prime minsiter, told members of Sarkozy's UMP party.

Rail services, flights and sea ports ran below capacity as the unions kept up their battle against Sarkozy's reform, intended to make people work longer for their pensions, including raising the minimum retirement age to 62 from 60.

The reform partly aims to reduce a ballooning pension deficit and safeguard France's coveted AAA credit rating.

Walkouts reduced flights from Paris's main airports by as much as 50 percent. One in three high-speed TGV trains were running, though international services operated with more frequency.

The Paris metro ran limited services and the Eiffel Tower was closed in the afternoon for lack of staff.

Families and students from universities and secondary schools turned out for protest marches in beautiful sunshine. Many gathered outside schools with about 300 colleges affected.

"It's the young people who are going to get it worst because they will not get hired," a female student told Reuters TV.

The senate voted on Monday to raise the age at which workers can retire on full pensions to 67 from 65, after already voting on raising the retirement age.

Mr Sarkozy has already made small concessions in the reform, but has said he will not back down on the bill's key points.

The government wants the legislation passed by the end of October and is betting on the strike action waning, especially among those who lose pay when they walk out.

But union leaders are vowing to keep up the pressure with the fourth pension protest in just over a month.

"From this point on the question is whether we need to have open-ended strikes," Jean-Claude Mailly, head of the more radical Force Ouvriere union told reporters. "Today's strike will have more demonstrators than the three previous ones," he said, adding he expected more than 3 million protesters.

Midway through the day of action the Interior Ministry said about 30 per cent more people were protesting than on Oct. 2.

Fair play, it's mental economics and they can't possibly have what they want but at least they'll do something when faced with a shafting.

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Wish we were more like the French!

well, from what I read it's french Public Sector....they need to be on the streets otherwise no-one would notice.

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The difference is French are allowed to have guns. Riding around on my bike tours in small villages you see speed cameras...... they are riddled with bullet holes same with stop signs, speed limit signs etc.

The British are completely unarmed. So when the people finally get off their bums when corrie or east enders goes off air a mass protest will be suppressed in hours when the government orders British soldiers to 'kill the terrorists' The state controlled media will then call it a terrorist attack.

In France when the order to murder your own citizens comes to the French army, they will be shot back at with small arms fire. Which is better than nothing.

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Fair play, it's mental economics and they can't possibly have what they want but at least they'll do something when faced with a shafting.

True, but we've got to bear in mind they're French. They shut the country down when the government makes it rain too much.

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well, from what I read is french Public Sector....they need to be on the streets otherwise no-one would notice.

if your argument implies that our Public Sector is any different them i'm afraid you've lost me.

;)

IT'S BETTER TO STAND UP FOR WHAT YOU BELIEVE IN AND DIE ON YOUR FEET THAN BE SUBSERVIENT APATHETIC AND LIVE ON YOUR KNEES

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if your argument implies that our Public Sector is any different them i'm afraid you've lost me.

;)

IT'S BETTER TO STAND UP FOR WHAT YOU BELIEVE IN AND DIE ON YOUR FEET THAN BE SUBSERVIENT APATHETIC AND LIVE ON YOUR KNEES

was in an NHS supplies today...staff were quite keen to tell me of the cutbacks and that many wouldnt have jobs soon...as they thought the place was about to be sold off.

there were so many of them, doing things, yes, chatting mostly....4 of them doing a bit of filing in the room I was in. Overheard someone in the next office clearly agitated..theyd done something and it was going on "their record"...dont know what it was....but with the cull coming, it was a bad thing.

sad for the people....but, there you are...

You see, if they were all 100% sure they were doing useful work, then they would be 100% sure a private contractor would keep them all.

they are not, so they are sure some, if not many will go.

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if your argument implies that our Public Sector is any different them i'm afraid you've lost me.

;)

IT'S BETTER TO STAND UP FOR WHAT YOU BELIEVE IN AND DIE ON YOUR FEET THAN BE SUBSERVIENT APATHETIC AND LIVE ON YOUR KNEES

Hear Hear.

Vive La France!

They know how to protest. I remember reading when clamping was introduced in Paris, everyone started carrying tubes of Super Glue around, and if they saw a clamp on a car, they would squirt glue in the lock.

If only us Brits would protest. We could have a Non Violent Protest day. [Just one Day!]

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

How about An Economic Non-Co-operation Day?

A Stay-At-Home Day.

What would that cost the economy?

We could set a date, ánd work up to it. Get other Like minded sites involved. If enough people got involved, the media would pick up on it.

Hell, we could even make it a pan-european, transatlantic affair, via the web!

How many people are priced out of housing in the UK, the whole of Europe, the USA?

B)

</h3> <h3>

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Over 1 million people demonstrated to try and prevent us starting the illegal war in Iraq.

The UK government was happy to ignore them, so why would marching around 'cause you don't agree with being told you can't retire early change anything?

Silly Billys!

:rolleyes:

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never mind.........................

tumbleweed.jpg

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was in an NHS supplies today...staff were quite keen to tell me of the cutbacks and that many wouldnt have jobs soon...as they thought the place was about to be sold off.

there were so many of them, doing things, yes, chatting mostly....4 of them doing a bit of filing in the room I was in. Overheard someone in the next office clearly agitated..theyd done something and it was going on "their record"...dont know what it was....but with the cull coming, it was a bad thing.

sad for the people....but, there you are...

You see, if they were all 100% sure they were doing useful work, then they would be 100% sure a private contractor would keep them all.

they are not, so they are sure some, if not many will go.

I used to work for an Investment Bank in the 90s and they went through an efficiency drive bringing in £2k a day management consultants. We were warned well in advance by our manager who told us to not do any work for a fortnight and then 'catch-up' in the week that all eyes were on us I guess if we were seen to do pretty much nothing then we'd have all got the chop! It's not hard pretending to work for a few 'important' days.

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FO getting stroppy. Things will stop altogether when the CGT start. The backlash is really against Sarko and his idiot policies rather than the single issue of retirement age (although that has become the flagship as it were). French public opinion has been asleep for a while now - the good times and money have had the same soporific effect here as everywhere else. The shock of Le Pen getting a big vote in the last election scared people and made them realise that if the middle ground don't bother to do anything the extremists get to hold power. Sarko was the best of a bad lot. The disgusting Islamaphobia is starting to get out of hand now. Expect to see some nasty riots and stuff in the coming few months. (No petrol bombs though as the refineries are on strike :D:D)

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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