Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Spot

How To Licence Sql Server 2008 In A Virtual Environment.

Recommended Posts

Hi Gang,

As I know there's a few IT Techies out there....

There's a lot of confusion where I work about the licencing model of SQL Server 2008 in a virtual environment.

This isn't helped by assorted documentation i've downloaded from Microsofts website which appears to give conflicting information.

Normally we would buy CPU licences for each SQL Server for ease of administration.

Could someone suggest what we would require for the following scenario....

Underlying hardware = 4 physical servers with 4 x quad core cpus.

This underlying hardware is carved up into many virtual environments using VMWare.

One of these virtual environments has SQL Server 2008 Standard Edition running and has 4 virtual CPUs assigned to it.

Because of load balancing, failover, etc the VM instance is not tied to any one physical server. It could at anytime reside on any one of the 4 underlying physical servers.

Now because this VM farm consisting of 4 servers is not purely for SQL it would not be worth buying a 16 cpu Enterprise Edition licence allowing unlimited VM instances of SQL, so....

The various docs i've seen suggest the following scenarios for CPU licencing....

1. One licence for each virtual CPU, eg: 4

2. The number of physical CPUs divided by the number of virtual CPUs assigned to the VM instance, eg: 4/4 = 1

The docs seem to indicate that because SQL could at anytime be on any one of the 4 underlying physical servers we would need licences for each server.

So for point 1 above we'd need 16 Standard Edition CPU licences and for point 2 we'd need 4.

Can someone confirm which is correct or is it something completely different?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's complex, you are right.

2 main questions - are you accessing it effective internally, or is it a free for all from the web? Ie do you actually need processor licenses, or does your internal msdn cover the cals?

http://download.microsoft.com/download/1/e/6/1e68f92c-f334-4517-b610-e4dee946ef91/2008%20SQL%20Licensing%20Overview%20final.docx

Gives the definitive answer.... assuming you can work it out.

I think the relevant passage is:

When licensed Per Processor

With Workgroup, Web, and Standard editions, for each server to which you have assigned the required number of per processor licenses, you may run, at any one time, any number of instances of the server software in physical and virtual operating system environments on the licensed server. However, the total number of physical and virtual processors used by those operating system environments cannot exceed the number of software licenses assigned to that server

For enterprise edition there is an added option: if all physical processors in a machine have been licensed, then you may run unlimited instances of SQL server 2008 in one physical and an unlimited number of virtual operating environments on that same machine.

Passive copies / Transferability of VMs

Passive copies of SQL Server 2008 that are on virtual environments which are not running on a machine do not require the purchase of licenses. Copies of SQL Server 2008 that are run on a virtual machine, can only be transferred from server to server every 90 days. Running copies of the VMs can be moved across licensed servers at any time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

in short - my expectation would be that as you are only running it AT ONE TIME on 1 of them you need 1 per phsyical cpu the vm can see while it is running.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Incidentally MS are good about the proc licenses - they are per socket/slot not by core. I understand oracle take the opposite stance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's complex, you are right.

2 main questions - are you accessing it effective internally, or is it a free for all from the web? Ie do you actually need processor licenses, or does your internal msdn cover the cals?

http://download.microsoft.com/download/1/e/6/1e68f92c-f334-4517-b610-e4dee946ef91/2008%20SQL%20Licensing%20Overview%20final.docx

Gives the definitive answer.... assuming you can work it out.

I think the relevant passage is:

FYI - We're big & corporate and have 100's of SQL Servers (just in UK, even more on mainland Europe) so CPU licencing just makes the admin of it all a lot easier than fannying around with CALs.

The way I read that doc is that if I have a Virtual Instance running SQL Server and for arguments sake it required 1 CPU licence, if the underlying hardware was 4 physical servers and VMWare could at any time dynamically move the virtual instance between servers then I would need a licence for any physical server it may end up on. See page 31.

So in this example I would actually need 4 CPU licences.

Have I interpretted that correctly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI - We're big & corporate and have 100's of SQL Servers (just in UK, even more on mainland Europe) so CPU licencing just makes the admin of it all a lot easier than fannying around with CALs.

The way I read that doc is that if I have a Virtual Instance running SQL Server and for arguments sake it required 1 CPU licence, if the underlying hardware was 4 physical servers and VMWare could at any time dynamically move the virtual instance between servers then I would need a licence for any physical server it may end up on. See page 31.

So in this example I would actually need 4 CPU licences.

Have I interpretted that correctly?

Fair enough, might cost a bunch more though!

I think you are right - unless you have the reasonable expectation to not bounce them more than 1ce per 90 days, but I tend to go for the Enterprise licenses - but then again you would still need to cover all the physical procs with your vm config. Either that or workgroup to save dosh, very rarely see a need to hit the middleground, but I am sure you have done that research.

If in doubt might be worth having a chat with your vendor, or M$ themselves (if you dare...) I'd imagine with that much kit you have some serious discounting going on.

For this it might be seriously worthwhile to check out the cal paradigm if its internal only, this appears to blow pretty bad finance wise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI - We're big & corporate and have 100's of SQL Servers (just in UK, even more on mainland Europe) so CPU licencing just makes the admin of it all a lot easier than fannying around with CALs.

The way I read that doc is that if I have a Virtual Instance running SQL Server and for arguments sake it required 1 CPU licence, if the underlying hardware was 4 physical servers and VMWare could at any time dynamically move the virtual instance between servers then I would need a licence for any physical server it may end up on. See page 31.

So in this example I would actually need 4 CPU licences.

Have I interpretted that correctly?

Try here >>> http://www.sevenforums.com/

Post in "General" - they will alert a specialist for an answer + move your post if needed to a different thread.

Make sure you say you are UK based to get accurate answer coz its manned 24hrs by systems guys/posters from around the World!

I go on there for difficult questions like licensing :)

There are specialists in every field you can imagine and they PM a specialist usually to answer your question.

Loads on there monitoring are Microsoft/oracle etc developers/server pros based in CaliKolcata!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI - We're big & corporate and have 100's of SQL Servers (just in UK, even more on mainland Europe) so CPU licencing just makes the admin of it all a lot easier than fannying around with CALs.

The way I read that doc is that if I have a Virtual Instance running SQL Server and for arguments sake it required 1 CPU licence, if the underlying hardware was 4 physical servers and VMWare could at any time dynamically move the virtual instance between servers then I would need a licence for any physical server it may end up on. See page 31.

So in this example I would actually need 4 CPU licences.

Have I interpretted that correctly?

Sadly that is how I interpret it as well. I think the logic is you have to licence each and every physical cpu the virtual cpu may use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SQL Server Enterprise does not give you unlimited visualizations anymore since the release of SQL Server 2008 R2. That would be SQL Server Datacentre Edition (about 35k a processor)

There are two ways to license SQL in the virtual environment

1. per physical

2. per virtual OSE

I would suggest the second

Is hyperthreading enabled?

I can't tell you unless I know that. I may forget to log in to this tomorrow to help you so...

If in any doubt on these matters in the future I would suggest you download the current Microsoft PUR (product use rights) from their site. That is the Microsoft licensing bible. Everything else is just a guide and may be out of date.

or phone microsoft ask business. they should put you through to their licensing team.

0844 800 2400

make sure you are very specific on our environment and if in doubt get it in writing.

Do not rely on an internet forum for your answer :-) ever

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 245 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.