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dryrot

(Eire) Updated Ghost Estates Website

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hi

The excellent Irish Ghost Estates website http://www.ghostestates.com now has Google Streetview Images - many updates.

anything like this in UK? I suppose the infestation of nasty 2-bed flats in Northern cities is closest.

New Look Ghost Estates Website October 2010 With Google Streetview Images of YOUR Personal Favourite Irish Ghost Estate http://www.ghostestates.com/

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The ghost estates exist in ireland because more houses were built than there were families to live in them. Nothing like that exists over here.

And on such an incredible scale too, still hard to believe.

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Thanks for the link - just shown it to Mrs DeepLurker. Although discussions of LIAR LOANS and BTL tax breaks tend to leave her cold, this website fascinated her - a very visual example of madness gripping a whole country.

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The ghost estates exist in ireland because more houses were built than there were families to live in them. Nothing like that exists over here.

Yeah, i guess thats one good thing about labours ineptitude, their house building targets and the reality were two completely different things.

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The ghost estates exist in ireland because more houses were built than there were families to live in them. Nothing like that exists over here.

They were built as the Irish Property Madness thrived - no house, anywhere, at any price, could possibly be worth less than the price at which it was bought.

Ireland never had the UK 90s correction, and the introduction of the Euro poured petrol on the fire...

Most of the Ghost Estates (red-pin are GoogeStreetView, green-pin are the older, subscriber-taken pics) wre built in areas that no-one would want to live or purchase, unless they had "to get on the ladder..."

At least that never happened in UK. Oh, hang on :(

Edited by dryrot

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Yeah, i guess thats one good thing about labours ineptitude, their house building targets and the reality were two completely different things.

Could the British government not just ship off all the benefit class to these places?

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Still silly prices. Zoomed into Maple Avenue, Naas. Looked like nice, though small, mock 1920-30s houses.

http://www.daft.ie/searchsale.daft?id=541161

485k euros FFS.

Seems high to me, all things considered. About 400k too high.

Got it in one. Was in that neck of the woods recently. Alright houses. But before this pans out, I reckon same type of abode will go for less than 100k. Incidentally, did some socialising in that area not so long ago. Visit pubs and restaurants in Greater Dublin and you will notice a huge shortage of 25-40 year olds. All sitting at home in their negative equity shoeboxes. It's actually eerie. You just don't see this age group knocking about. Ok many are married and playing happy families. But from personal experience these were by and large the poor misguided eejits who fell for the property pushers propaganda and are and now in debt up to their necks. 40 more years of staying at home watching X factor, with no holidays, pensions or car. Reckon it's no coinicidence that Irish viewers can now vote for the X factor: it's a captive stay at home audience. Knew one girl who queued all night to slap down a deposit on a 400K 2 bed flat in this area of Ireland a few years ago. The madness of crowds......

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wait.... what?!?

all those dots on the map (on the link) are a group of houses over the number of 1 that have been built but not sold?

i was not aware of this, that is pure madness.

no wonder Irelands property crash was/is so severe

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Got it in one. Was in that neck of the woods recently. Alright houses. But before this pans out, I reckon same type of abode will go for less than 100k. Incidentally, did some socialising in that area not so long ago. Visit pubs and restaurants in Greater Dublin and you will notice a huge shortage of 25-40 year olds. All sitting at home in their negative equity shoeboxes. It's actually eerie. You just don't see this age group knocking about. Ok many are married and playing happy families. But from personal experience these were by and large the poor misguided eejits who fell for the property pushers propaganda and are and now in debt up to their necks. 40 more years of staying at home watching X factor, with no holidays, pensions or car. Reckon it's no coinicidence that Irish viewers can now vote for the X factor: it's a captive stay at home audience. Knew one girl who queued all night to slap down a deposit on a 400K 2 bed flat in this area of Ireland a few years ago. The madness of crowds......

To top it all, you cannot even go bankrupt easily..

Personal Bankruptcy – Is it time to change the law?Link

In 2005, the United Kingdom had 47,291 bankruptcies. The Republic of Ireland had 9.

Although there are options for the more wealthy... :rolleyes:

Debtors flee Irish bankruptcy laws and go to UK Link

DEVELOPERS, financiers and prominent businessmen are seeking domicile in the United Kingdom and elsewhere in a bid to avoid Irish bankruptcy laws, according to legal sources.

The Irish Independent has learned that several high profile builders and executives have secured or are in the process of establishing residency in Britain where bankrupts can avail of a "fresh start" in less than two years compared with Ireland's cumbersome 12-year term under the 1988 Bankruptcy Act.

The spectre of relocation raised its head earlier this week when National Irish Bank informed the Commercial Court that financier Niall McFadden, whom it is suing for €6.3m, had relocated to London.

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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The ghost estates exist in ireland because more houses were built than there were families to live in them. Nothing like that exists over here.

So, not only have they wrecked their economy for a generation, but even the results of the bubble - new housing stock - is going to rot away.

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To top it all, you cannot even go bankrupt easily..

Personal Bankruptcy – Is it time to change the law?Link

Although there are options for the more wealthy... :rolleyes:

Debtors flee Irish bankruptcy laws and go to UK Link

;)

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Got it in one. Was in that neck of the woods recently. Alright houses. But before this pans out, I reckon same type of abode will go for less than 100k. Incidentally, did some socialising in that area not so long ago. Visit pubs and restaurants in Greater Dublin and you will notice a huge shortage of 25-40 year olds. All sitting at home in their negative equity shoeboxes. It's actually eerie. You just don't see this age group knocking about. Ok many are married and playing happy families. But from personal experience these were by and large the poor misguided eejits who fell for the property pushers propaganda and are and now in debt up to their necks. 40 more years of staying at home watching X factor, with no holidays, pensions or car. Reckon it's no coinicidence that Irish viewers can now vote for the X factor: it's a captive stay at home audience. Knew one girl who queued all night to slap down a deposit on a 400K 2 bed flat in this area of Ireland a few years ago. The madness of crowds......

I think a lot of 'em have fecked off. Yet another mass exodus of the younger generation from Ireland to everywhere (anywhere) else... There have been some good (i.e. fecking depressing) articles on this in the Guardian and Observer over the past few years.

Some links....

Good stuff here, but you need to wade through the non-economy stuff: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/ireland?page=1

Here's a good representative article: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/may/10/ireland-financial-crisis-emigration

Edited by tomandlu

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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