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ralphmalph

The British Public Still Have Common Sense

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Unless your really thick and a socialist you realise that a nation can't live beyond its means anymore than an individual.

I laugh when the same posters on here who knock the overindebted leveraged consumer start going on about how the coalition are wrong to start cutting.

Economically clueless.

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Cutting welfare means less consumer spending, less money in the economy, lower wages and fewer jobs.

It's called maths.

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Cutting welfare means less consumer spending, less money in the economy, lower wages and fewer jobs.

It's called maths.

No it is not maths at all it is called Gordonomics, or money grows on trees.

Just to educate you think of this. The banks are bust,, acknowledged fact. So if they have say 100 units of something to lend and if the govt takes 90 of that, that leaves 10 for business. So let make cuts so that govt is saying 25% - sp 90 * .75 = 67.5 which means 32.5 for business.

Cut govt spending by 25% get a 325% increase in money for business expansion.

So as you can see to the thicko, rabble raisers like Balls it is maths, to educated people it is invesmtent.

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Unless your really thick and a socialist you realise that a nation can't live beyond its means anymore than an individual.

I laugh when the same posters on here who knock the overindebted leveraged consumer start going on about how the coalition are wrong to start cutting.

Economically clueless.

You don't see a problem with printing money to stimulate spending while at the same time embarking on a huge programme of cuts?

The problem here is the government are trying to manipulate two quite different groups- to the public they want to send the message that things are looking better so it's safe to get spending again, while to the bond markets they are saying don't worry we are serious about cutting the deficit.

Unfortunately there is no way to stop the public reacting to the cuts by cutting their spending- so all that dangerous QE is being negated by the need to appease the money men.

So the resulting message is hopelessly garbled in transmission- with the result that both the public and the money men end up more worried than ever.

It's like a clown at a childrens party trying to distract attention from the corpse that's being carried out the door :D

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You don't see a problem with printing money to stimulate spending while at the same time embarking on a huge programme of cuts?

When have I ever said QE is good? Its a disgraceful situation to undertake.

All I say is that the central banks will print and print and print. Regardless of whether this is a good idea or bad, in such a situation cash and bonds become trash investments.

Anyway back to the point -

Spending more than you take in taxes - Muppet economics.

QE - Muppet economics.

The only solution is to re-adjust the economy on the basis of production and savings. Unfortunately the government have yet to produce a real plan for the former and the BoE is intent on destroying the latter.

Still had the zanus got re-elected we would have lost our triple A by now :D

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The idea that a nation paralysed by dependency on a state to "stimulate economic activity" will recover by relying on the same state to pump up more phantom activity is puerile.

The state must shrink; not merely because of the government debt but because the people have to learn to do without it. There is simply no other way; there is only going to be economic health if real people make and do real, valuable things, and the population as a whole relearns the business of wealth creation.

It's actually a lot more important than just the deficit.

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No it is not maths at all it is called Gordonomics, or money grows on trees.

Just to educate you think of this. The banks are bust,, acknowledged fact. So if they have say 100 units of something to lend and if the govt takes 90 of that, that leaves 10 for business. So let make cuts so that govt is saying 25% - sp 90 * .75 = 67.5 which means 32.5 for business.

Cut govt spending by 25% get a 325% increase in money for business expansion.

So as you can see to the thicko, rabble raisers like Balls it is maths, to educated people it is invesmtent.

You are a complete idiot

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Cutting welfare means less consumer spending, less money in the economy, lower wages and fewer jobs.

It's called maths.

Cutting welfare means less borrowing, lower taxes, more consumer spending, more money in the economy and more jobs (in the long run).

It's called maths

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Tackling working class welfare won’t be that much of a political problem for the government. The British public somewhat understand the arithmetic issue and have well inculcated moral models which allow it. The political problems are going to start up when if the government tries to do something substantial to tackle the bulk of the actual problem; the upper middle class welfare system. It’s pretty pointless reducing working class welfare, if the bulk of the economy remains essentially a giant real estate profit based welfare system; we will still go down the tubes.

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Cutting welfare means less borrowing, lower taxes, more consumer spending, more money in the economy and more jobs (in the long run).

It's called maths

Less taxes?

The taxes we pay now are not enough to support the level of spending, that's why the annual deficit is about £160 billion. All of the planned cuts will reduce this annual deficit to about £80 billion. The cuts then will mean we'll still be spending beyond our means. In the absence of a remarkable economic recovery I can't see less taxes anytime soon.

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********.

The general public don't in majority gain from benefits signficantly. Try taking a poll in a council state rather than the telegraph.

(please don't reply calling me pro-benefits, I agree too, just pointing out the motive of those voting)

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Less taxes?

I meant lower tax levels compared with not cutting spending, which coincidentally would lead to higher tax revenues due to growth in the economy over the long term.

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What about those unable to work? Say someone who has worked and saved for thirty years then has a e.g. a stroke.or is crippled in a car crash.

Their savings, family assistance, downsizing house, critical illness insurance, personal injury insurance, a claim against driver's policy if car crash not your fault, or a claim against the general insurance fund if driver was uninsured. Not all these hard luck stories tapping the taxpayer for benefits.

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I love the way socialist lefties on here merely reply with abuse.

There is never any thoughtful, logical reponse.

I guess that is the basis of socialism. Fuk all idea about economics.

There really arent many socialists left nowadays. Socialism implies the support of your peers. Socialim implies govermental support of the people. Unfortunately, particularly on HPC, our arguments have been blanked.

But then again, given the performance of Thatcher, Major, Blair and Brown how can you possibly suggest ant of them understand economics? All left a deficit, all sold our countries treasures, but its socialists who caused the problems.

Oh, and socialists are polite, and they can also spell, its just that some of us didnt get sent to public school.

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Unless your really thick and a socialist you realise that a nation can't live beyond its means anymore than an individual.

I laugh when the same posters on here who knock the overindebted leveraged consumer start going on about how the coalition are wrong to start cutting.

Economically clueless.

it's people like you who are thick and clueless. 2.5 million unemployed (officially) and 0.5 million jobs.

Jobs deficit = 2 million + all those in receipt of incapacity benefits.

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it's people like you who are thick and clueless. 2.5 million unemployed (officially) and 0.5 million jobs.

Jobs deficit = 2 million + all those in receipt of incapacity benefits.

And what point have you made, apart from GB left us with high unemployment.

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Their savings, family assistance, downsizing house, critical illness insurance, personal injury insurance, a claim against driver's policy if car crash not your fault, or a claim against the general insurance fund if driver was uninsured. Not all these hard luck stories tapping the taxpayer for benefits.

You mention a lot of insurances

But we already pay National Insurance. I'm sure everyone on here knows that this is now a joke, but most workers aren't that clued up. They have been led to believe by governments that if they've paid in to National Insurance they will get some sort of sickness benefit if they are genuinely unable to work. So, in the belief they are covered by the state more than 99% of people don't have any sort of private insurance to replace their income if they can't work long term.

EDIT don't want to confuse - lots of people have critical illness insurance, usually along with their life insurance, but this only covers a limited number of conditions, less than 1% I was told have comprehensive cover for long term income replacement, which is called Permanent Health Insurance/Income Protection Insurance

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But we already pay National Insurance. I'm sure everyone on here knows that this is now a joke, but most workers aren't that clued up.

I've not got any real answer to that because, unlike your 'most workers', I've never thought to rely on the state for anything. Knowing that benefits are supposed to be just a minimal safety net. A safety net which can't keep everyone in the conditions of income and housing that they formerly knew prior to a change of circumstances. Such as ill health or unemployment. To the best of our abilities my family stands ready to look after itself in the event of an unexpected change of circumstance. Both with savings and in general attitude to meet and adjust to new challenges.

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..to put the child benefit cuts into context ...the vast majority do not pay higher rate tax ....the vast majority will back such cuts as they are not affected (yet) ....it's only these 'rich' people....... :rolleyes:

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I've not got any real answer to that because, unlike your 'most workers', I've never thought to rely on the state for anything. Knowing that benefits are supposed to be just a minimal safety net. A safety net which can't keep everyone in the conditions of income and housing that they formerly knew prior to a change of circumstances. Such as ill health or unemployment. To the best of our abilities my family stands ready to look after itself in the event of an unexpected change of circumstance. Both with savings and in general attitude to meet and adjust to new challenges.

I've come across lots of people who believe their NI stamp payments cover two things, State Pension and Sickness Benefit. I'm not saying the state should pay for either of these but at least they should give plenty of notice if they're going to stop so people can make alternative arrangements.

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  • 261 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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