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Council Rebels And Puts Locals Ahead Of Asylums Seekers For Housing

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1319051/Asylum-seekers-housing-queue-Britains-biggest-council-decides-locals-first.html

Asylum seekers last in the housing queue: Britain's biggest council decides to put its locals first
By Jack Doyle
Last updated at 2:24 AM on 9th October 2010
Cllr John Lines said the decision was 'in the interests of local people'
The largest council in the country is to stop providing homes for asylum seekers
– so it can offer the properties to locals.
Birmingham City Council said last night that it had seen a surge in the number of existing residents who found themselves homeless in the aftermath of the economic slump.

:blink:

Edited by Realistbear

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http://www.dailymail...cals-first.html

Asylum seekers last in the housing queue: Britain's biggest council decides to put its locals first
By Jack Doyle
Last updated at 2:24 AM on 9th October 2010
Cllr John Lines said the decision was 'in the interests of local people'
The largest council in the country is to stop providing homes for asylum seekers
– so it can offer the properties to locals.
Birmingham City Council said last night that it had seen a surge in the number of existing residents who found themselves homeless in the aftermath of the economic slump.

:blink:

Breathtaking - 'they' admit it! :o

I woz recently called a NAZI for daring to suggest that council Housing policies were deliberately BIASED against indigenous Brits.

My example was the local yokels rebelling and voting in the BNP in towns up North after years of being downtrodden.

My God - so they've housed MILLIONS of Foreigners over the last decade ahead of Brits who have to wait years - nothing more than I expected.

Who were labour/con Housing ministers in this period?

How much were Councillors creaming off the taxpayer in in bent salaries whilst this bent policy went on?

Then again - it's the Daily Mail with it's "upset the UK" policies!

Edited by erranta

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Just enter them all into talent shows, get them to fraudulently obtain benefits and overstay their visas, and send them upto Scotland.

According to Labours Gordon Banks, thats what makes them good citizens.

http://www.birminghammail.net/news/birmingham-mail-indepth/the-x-factor-2010/2010/10/06/x-factor-gamu-deportation-row-minister-urged-to-get-involved-97319-27419241/

He wants them, he can have them.

Anyway, call me cynical, but theyve probably just run out of houses and thought theyd pick up some votes/headlines by annoucing this.

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1319051/Asylum-seekers-housing-queue-Britains-biggest-council-decides-locals-first.html

Asylum seekers last in the housing queue: Britain's biggest council decides to put its locals first
By Jack Doyle
Last updated at 2:24 AM on 9th October 2010
Cllr John Lines said the decision was 'in the interests of local people'
The largest council in the country is to stop providing homes for asylum seekers
– so it can offer the properties to locals.
Birmingham City Council said last night that it had seen a surge in the number of existing residents who found themselves homeless in the aftermath of the economic slump.

:blink:

Under the five-year contract, the council provided 190 properties to asylum seekers, but with turnover it meant up to 1,000 staying in the city every year.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1319051/Asylum-seekers-housing-queue-Britains-biggest-council-decides-locals-first.html#ixzz11rIDd3iC

"total number of council houses in Birmingham (...) about 68,000 properties under municipal control today."

http://www.birminghammail.net/news/top-stories/2009/02/04/birmingham-to-build-500-council-homes-a-year-97319-22851952/#ixzz11rHuucGC

People please, it is essential to start with data, always, if you want to have a balanced, fair view of things.

.

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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People please, it is essential to start with data, always, if you want to have a balanced, fair view of things.

Wonder what the percentage is that have gone to foreign born folk, its data like this they never tell you.

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Wonder what the percentage is that have gone to foreign born folk, its data like this they never tell you.

"They" who? There are all sort of data available on-line, from all sort of sources. You can Google about it, and find out for yourself. We do that all the time regarding housing in this site.

For instance: How many foreign born people live in Britain, and how many British born people live abroad?

Google about it.

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There's quite a complicated history to this.

Asylum seekers are not given council tenancies

This is because about ten years ago the Labour governemnt took away the automatic right of asylum seekers to council housing in order to move them out of London

Instead they were given a different type of very temporary housing whilst their claim was assessed. Housing providers, (private, HA and council) in areas with low demand for housing would bid for these contracts to house asylum seekers

So Birmingham council were simply using spare housing from their stock to house asylum seekers on a short term basis

If the asylum claim is accepted they lose the property and have to fidn somewhere else

If the asylum claim is lost they obviosuly also lose the property

Edited by oldsport

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There's quite a complicated history to this.

Asylum seekers are not given council tenancies

This is because about ten years ago the Labour governemnt took away the automatic right of asylum seekers to council housing in order to move them out of London

Instead they were given a different type of very temporary housing whilst their claim was assessed. Housing providers, (private, HA and council) in areas with low demand for housing would bid for these contracts to house asylum seekers

So Birmingham council were simply using spare housing from their stock to house asylum seekers on a short term basis

If the asylum claim is accepted they lose the property and have to fidn somewhere else

If the asylum claim is lost they obviosuly also lose the property

Council houses are transferred to a quango housing association, asylum seekers are housed in them and given vouchers (some cities have buildings where these can be exchanged for cash), securing a tenancy straight away. When their claim is approved, the house is transferred back to the council, the now legal tenants remain in the house. They are supplied with information on how to claim benefits and help to claim benefits.

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Council houses are transferred to a quango housing association, asylum seekers are housed in them and given vouchers (some cities have buildings where these can be exchanged for cash), securing a tenancy straight away. When their claim is approved, the house is transferred back to the council, the now legal tenants remain in the house. They are supplied with information on how to claim benefits and help to claim benefits.

That's not how it works. There is never a tenancy. The housing is temporary; only whilst their asylum claim is being decided. They are then removed and the property is used for another asylum seeker.

Edited by oldsport

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What makes this country a haven for Asylum seekers?

Why not seek asylum in Germany for example or Portugal?

Could it be something to do with the promise of "easy street" if they qualify and an opening for the relatives to follow on?

If the Koalishon wish to continue Tony Blair's NuLabour policy of come one come all then surely we need to start building purpose built housing for them by way of new estates with proper infrastructure by way of schools, teachers with particular language skills and medical care?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/video/2009/mar/16/asylum-seekers-refused-britain

Edited by Realistbear

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What makes this country a haven for Asylum seekers?

Why not seek asylum in Germany for example or Portugal?

Germany accepted the highest number of asylum seekers in Europe up to about 2000. It was certainly a haven, with very generous policies, this all based on laws put in place to atone for WWII treatment of minorities. UK took over from there, well, we know now from leaked papers that government wanted a piece of the cheap labour action and to diversify certain populations.

I hear that applications are on the rise again in Germany.

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I suggest you read this link http://cmis.derby.gov.uk/CMISWebPublic/Binary.ashx?Document=10818

<br /><br />

Thanks for that update, that's very interesting.

If I'm understanding it correctly it seems that since 2008 there has been a scheme to extend the temporary accommodation of successful asylum seeker families. Rather than evicting them from their temporary accommodation 28 days after the successful asylum decision and then housing them in different temporary accomodation under the homelessness law whilst they wait for an offer of permanent accommodation from the waiting list; instead the family can now stay in their original temporary accomodation whilst they wait for an offer from the waiting list. Is that how you see it?

It refers to "families". Do you know whether this scheme is for all asylum seekers or just those with dependent children?

The following section seems to make it clear though that they are not jumping the queue for a permanent tenancy ahead of other homeless families which is what I thought you were saying.

Other options considered

.............

2.11

Another option would be to suspend the Housing Allocations Policy and make available all new lets to the refugee families until such time as they are all satisfactorily housed. This option would be unfair to all other families on the waiting list and would be open to legal challenge.

Edited by oldsport

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Why don't the asylum seekers just move to London and get themselves a seven-bedroom house in Kensington, Maida Vale or Chelsea?

They're banned from receiving benefits or being housed by councils under the homeless laws

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I listened to Peter Allen (bell-end, 5 live) interviewing this guy, horrified that he was putting the locals ahead of asylum seekers. "So what about the asylum seekers?" He gasped, depserate to get a Jeremy Paxman type 'scoop' (when the culture secretary dared suggest that people should make sure they can support their family before having more children on Newsnight)

There's a real attempt by the BBC to paint the Tories as the evil party for doing sensible things. Unfortunately for the BBC, the majority of it's listeners agree with the government. They really do inhabit their own world, i just wish the tories would cast them adrift and let them fend for themselves instead of trying to form public opinion around their communist/socialist/marxist beliefs.

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A genuine asylum seeker is fleeing for their life.

Genuine asylum seekers in the UK could only come from a country bordering the UK. (Ireland, France Belgium, Holland, Norway, Iceland, )

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Thanks for that update, that's very interesting.

If I'm understanding it correctly it seems that since 2008 there has been a scheme to extend the temporary accommodation of successful asylum seeker families. Rather than evicting them from their temporary accommodation 28 days after the successful asylum decision and then housing them in different temporary accomodation under the homelessness law whilst they wait for an offer of permanent accommodation from the waiting list; instead the family can now stay in their original temporary accomodation whilst they wait for an offer from the waiting list. Is that how you see it?

It refers to "families". Do you know whether this scheme is for all asylum seekers or just those with dependent children?

The following section seems to make it clear though that they are not jumping the queue for a permanent tenancy ahead of other homeless families which is what I thought you were saying.

It very much depends on the area. The delayed eviction scheme is actively being used in some places whilst council accommodation can be found or tenancies converted. Many of the properties belong to the council and are let to an agency so they often convert the tenancy back to 'council', so the people granted asylum need not move (this is what many people will refer to as 'jumping the list').

Not much of this information is published, and it is often published by accident in council minutes etc. such information being exempt from publication as it contains information listed in schedule 12A of the local government act 1972.

The coming year will be a very interesting one, as the amount of homeless people increases, the demand for social housing will increase, a lot of places are already housing people for well over a year in b&b's etc., due to a lack of housing and that is after years of decline in the amount of homeless.

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It very much depends on the area. The delayed eviction scheme is actively being used in some places whilst council accommodation can be found or tenancies converted. Many of the properties belong to the council and are let to an agency so they often convert the tenancy back to 'council', so the people granted asylum need not move (this is what many people will refer to as 'jumping the list').

Not much of this information is published, and it is often published by accident in council minutes etc. such information being exempt from publication as it contains information listed in schedule 12A of the local government act 1972.

The coming year will be a very interesting one, as the amount of homeless people increases, the demand for social housing will increase, a lot of places are already housing people for well over a year in b&b's etc., due to a lack of housing and that is after years of decline in the amount of homeless.

I thought it was a bit weird that I could find so little about it when I Googled after reading your link. It's hardly a matter of national security though, can't see why they want to hide it. Very strange!

I can see how that would be thought of as queue jumping although I'm surpried councils do this; isn't it unusual for councils to convert their temporary stock into permanent tenancies because temporary accommodation is furnished etc?

There's so much empty social housing up North I'm sure they'll find places for the asylum seekers, although I know that's not the only issue. And it could be a nice earner for the council if the rates paid by NASS are good, I heard they were for private landlords at least? Do you have any idea how many asylum seeker families are currently being accommdoated? It's years since I've followed this sort of thing.

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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