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SickofRenting

Clothes Lines Lowers Property Values

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I had a look at this article on the Beeb website

Clothes Line Ban

I know this is in the US, but a ban to stop people from drying clothes naturally is gobsmackingly wow!

People say it looks unslightly and lowers property values. :ph34r:

I had to laugh, I thought these people need to get a grip, what do you expect if you live in a residental area?

:blink:

Not sure on the effects it would have here, but we could try to leave washing out on our front lawns? :lol: Might just tip the scales :P

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I had a look at this article on the Beeb website

Clothes Line Ban

I know this is in the US, but a ban to stop people from drying clothes naturally is gobsmackingly wow!

People say it looks unslightly and lowers property values.  :ph34r:

I had to laugh, I thought these people need to get a grip, what do you expect if you live in a residental area?

:blink:

Not sure on the effects it would have here, but we could try to leave washing out on our front lawns? :lol: Might just tip the scales :P

1432215479_1b3f041929.jpg

mexico_05.1122945000.kids_playing_near_clothes_lines.jpg

A solution to the above problem:

100_8339.JPG

Nice!

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Well obviously house prices need to be pegged to something else then.

:P

D

You would be 'done' for money laundering :o then hung out to dry! :rolleyes:

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The seller would have to be at least 3 sheets to the wind if they trhink they are going to get asking price. *

________________________________

* To understand this phrase we need to enter the arcane world of nautical terminology. Sailors' language is, unsurprisingly, all at sea and many supposed derivations have to go by the board. Don't be taken aback to hear that sheets aren't sails, as landlubbers might expect, but ropes (or occasionally, chains). These are fixed to the lower corners of sails, to hold them in place. If three sheets are loose and blowing about in the wind then the sails will flap and the boat will lurch about like a drunken sailor.

The phrase is these days more often given as 'three sheets to the wind', rather than the original 'three sheets in the wind'. The earliest printed citation that I can find is in Pierce Egan's Real Life in London, 1821:

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It would be nice to able to naturally dry our clothes without our wonderful upwind neighbours filling our garden with BBQ or chiminea smoke all summer long. With two very young children it is most frustrating not to mention bloody inconsiderate and anti-social.

However, the weather has perked up this week and I notice the breeze is coming from the east.......Mwahahahaha! Revenge will be mine!

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Trampolines are a great nuisance and devaluer.

Actually just having next door neighbours has a knock on affect on property values but there's no acceptable solution to that one. :rolleyes:

Edited by billybong

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I know it sounds ridiculous, but clothes lines really do lower property values in the US. Having and using a tumble dryer is a cultural touchstone in the US. Only the poorest of the poor are seen as using clothes lines, so there's a whole load of cultural baggage attached to them. It's the same as saying that you live in a mobile home. No matter how nice or expensive the mobile home, it still implies lower class in the US. If perspective buyers see neighbours with a clothes line or a mobile home next door, the automatic assumption is that the neighbourhood is a ghetto.

(This is starting to change with more attention to ecological issues, but outside of a few, more liberal areas, clothes lines will still lower property values).

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I had a look at this article on the Beeb website

Clothes Line Ban

I know this is in the US, but a ban to stop people from drying clothes naturally is gobsmackingly wow!

People say it looks unslightly and lowers property values. :ph34r:

I had to laugh, I thought these people need to get a grip, what do you expect if you live in a residental area?

:blink:

Not sure on the effects it would have here, but we could try to leave washing out on our front lawns? :lol: Might just tip the scales :P

We bought our house over 30 years ago from a German couple. The garden's pretty small and I did ask about a clothes line, since I couldn't see one and had a young baby in the old towelling nappies.

The woman literally curled her lip - I forget the exact words but she more or less said she wouldn't dream of doing anything so low and disgustingly common as hanging washing in the garden. :P

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This is actually very good news. For the last umpteen years I've endured umpteen reasons for prices only going up...

  • There are excellent road links to the next town.
  • Check out these twigs in vases.
  • The Prodigy once played a gig within a hundred miles of here.
  • Magnolia walls.
  • We can get ADSL with BT you know.
  • There's a Marks and Spencers food hall near here.
  • There's an Ikea near here.
  • There's a Marconi site near here.
  • The 2012 Olympics!!!!!!
  • This town is special.

yet there has never been a recognised reason why house prices could possibly fall.

Now there is. Whoopee.

  :D

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From my experience of growing up in a relatively affluent neighborhood in America clothes lines were absolutely unthinkable. The main concern was to park only luxury sedans, preferably German, in the driveway and secure anything else in the garage which had to remain closed at all times.

Homeowners Associations run most upper middle class suburbs in the US and they are usually very strict. If you go on holiday and don't pay someone to cut the grass while you are gone then expect a fine when you return. And you will get complaints when you have a party and some people unthoughtfully park on the street.

Its crap like that why I prefer the third world to the US although I seem to get a nice mix here in London.

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Definitely a cultural difference. When my near relatives (Brits) were renting in a suburb of Dallas and they hung washing in the back garden, two different sets of neighbours came round to tell them that this was simply not done and that only Hispanics did that sort of thing.

They were also told in no uncertain terms that they had to fly the flag on Independence Day.

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Definitely a cultural difference. When my near relatives (Brits) were renting in a suburb of Dallas and they hung washing in the back garden, two different sets of neighbours came round to tell them that this was simply not done and that only Hispanics did that sort of thing.

They were also told in no uncertain terms that they had to fly the flag on Independence Day.

Another reason I hated America. I used to fly the Mexican flag, the French flag, even the hammer and sickle just to piss people off. Good thing I got outta there before Homeland Security was invented.

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I know it sounds ridiculous, but clothes lines really do lower property values in the US. Having and using a tumble dryer is a cultural touchstone in the US. Only the poorest of the poor are seen as using clothes lines, so there's a whole load of cultural baggage attached to them. It's the same as saying that you live in a mobile home. No matter how nice or expensive the mobile home, it still implies lower class in the US. If perspective buyers see neighbours with a clothes line or a mobile home next door, the automatic assumption is that the neighbourhood is a ghetto.

(This is starting to change with more attention to ecological issues, but outside of a few, more liberal areas, clothes lines will still lower property values).

I believe you, but it makes me want to punch a stupid american so god damn hard it's not funny.

For a start, line drying will make your clothes last longer, shirts will be easier to iron , yah di yah di yah.

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Definitely a cultural difference. When my near relatives (Brits) were renting in a suburb of Dallas and they hung washing in the back garden, two different sets of neighbours came round to tell them that this was simply not done and that only Hispanics did that sort of thing.

They were also told in no uncertain terms that they had to fly the flag on Independence Day.

Gringo culo! :lol:

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Definitely a cultural difference. When my near relatives (Brits) were renting in a suburb of Dallas and they hung washing in the back garden, two different sets of neighbours came round to tell them that this was simply not done and that only Hispanics did that sort of thing.

They were also told in no uncertain terms that they had to fly the flag on Independence Day.

Hadn't these neighbours read the First Amendment? I thought Americans respected their constitution.

They have an absolute right to come round and say their piece. The washing hanger has an absolute right to ignore them, including not flying the stars and stripes on any particular day. Personally I'd fly both flags side by side as a gesture of international relations.

As a reasonable person I would offer a concession like hanging washing out at at 7am and getting it in before 9. As for referring to Hispanics negatively, they need to carefully check Texan and Federal race relations laws before spouting anything like that in public.

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  • 150 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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