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Realistbear

U K Recovery Fears Grow On Weak Export Data--Unexpected?

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/industry/8037996/UK-recovery-fears-grow-on-weak-export-data.html

UK recovery fears grow on weak export data
Export orders fell for the first time in more than in year in September, stoking fears that the economic recovery is losing momentum.
By Emma "Em" Rowley
Published: 6:14AM BST 02 Oct 2010
UK manufacturing activity slowed to a 10-month low, according to the Markit/CIPS purchasing managers' index Photo: Reuters Weaker demand in the consumer goods sector and
falling sales to clients in mainland Europe, the US and Russia were blamed
for the first decline in new export orders since July 2009.
Overall, UK manufacturing activity slowed to a 10-month low, according to the Markit/CIPS purchasing managers' index (PMI). The index was down to 53.4 in September from a negatively revised reading of 53.7 in August, where a figure over 50 indicates expansion.
Telecity shares jump amid takeover rumoursThe latest reading represented
a bigger drop than expected
by economists, who had forecast a fall to 53.8.

It seems as if every bit of doom and gloom is "unexpected" these days. Even the BoE keep publishing unexpected data as if the world's greatest collapse would not have some repercussions. Next we will have unexecpected falling house prices despite tighening credit, job losses, collapsing exports and big drops in PMI.

I, for one, am expecting a lot of doom and gloom ahead and enjoying every bit of it in my own house purchasing mode kind of way.

Edited by Realistbear

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Looks like it's global.

Global manufacturing growth slows in September

LONDON, Oct 1 (Reuters) - The pace of global manufacturing

growth slipped in September to a 14-month low as the expansion

of order books and exports eased, a survey showed on Friday.

The JPMorgan Global Manufacturing PMI, which measures

activity of factories across the world's major industrial

centres, fell in September to 52.5 from 53.7 in August, although

still above the 50 mark that divides growth from contraction.

While Chinese manufacturing picked up steam, the survey

identified weakening growth in the United States and euro zone.

"The PMI is likely to fall further in coming months,

based on the continued slide in the ratio of new orders to

inventory," said David Hensley of JPMorgan.

"As a result, production is likely to stop growing or even

contract in the next few months on a transitory basis."

The new orders index eased in September to 51.4 from 52.4 in

August, while new export orders rose at the weakest pace since

July 2009.

A survey released earlier on Friday showed U.S.

manufacturing growth slowing in September, marked by slower

expansion of jobs.

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I agree--it is largely global so why is every piece of bad economic news in this country "unexpected?" We partcipated in the HPI madness as much as the US, Ireland and Spain so we should expect the same fallout that is coming our way. Just because the HPC hasn't really begun here yet (at least not in the VI stats and EA reports) does not mean we should not expect it.

If things are "unexpectedly" bad now, how unexpeced will it be after the first of the cuts begin this month? Will the BoE et. al. still find the consequences unexpected?

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So the UK figure was 53.8 and the global figure was 52.5?

UK manufacturing is growing faster than the world average according to the figures , there is too much negative spin in the article.

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your simply being told its 'unexpected' because, say in the case of inflation, if the BoE expected higher inflation they would be compelled to do something about it, like raise interest rates. so they keep predicting low inflation so they can continue with low interest rates to put money in the pockets of their banking friends. The unexpected export data is only viewed as unexpected, ie a blip, because if a lower export data was expected it would be an admission of failed policy, same in housing. its all smoke and mirrors lies and deception to fool the public into believing that everything is ok and these bad numbers are just blips in an expected improvement/recovery. hence they cannot be admitted as expected but only as unexpected. IMO

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When i look at the fiqures coming out of some Asian countries compaired to our own, it's shocking. Why is Europe our biggest export market anyway is it down to cost of product.

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  • 142 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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