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Ed Miliband: I Would Raise Taxes Higher Than Gordon Brown

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/ed-miliband/8034851/Ed-Miliband-I-would-raise-taxes-higher-than-Gordon-Brown.html

The new leader said that he wanted to do “more” from taxation, adding that plans by Alistair Darling, the former chancellor, to cut the deficit over four years were only a “starting point”.

Mr Miliband, who joined in the traditional singing of the Red Flag at the close of Labour conference, has hit out his characterisation as “Red Ed” after he defeated his brother for the party leadership with the support of the trade unions.

But in a break from the New Labour era, when Tony Blair’s ministers shied away from advocating tax rises, he made clear that he was unafraid of being labelled left-wing.

Labour fought the last election on a programme of delivering a third of the savings needed to cut the deficit from tax rises.

Following the last Government’s defeat at the polls, George Osborne, the Chancellor, announced in his emergency budget in June that less than a quarter of the Coalition’s proposed deficit reduction plan would be found from tax rises. The rest is set to come from cuts to public spending.

Over the last few months, Mr Darling has consistently called for Labour to stick to his four year deficit reduction, arguing that it would not be credible for the party to delay cuts, or raise taxes any higher.

However, he is due to stand down from the front bench when the new shadow cabinet is appointed next week.

And following his election as leader, Mr Miliband has now made clear that he will set his own economic policy – disclosing that he would start by urging a higher banking levy.

He told Channel 4 News: “I would do more from taxation than Alistair proposed in his plan. Alistair’s plan was two-thirds spending cuts, one third taxation. I think we can do more with taxation.

“Alistair’s plan is the starting point with two additional things. First of all [we] should look to do more from taxation. We can take more from the banks and in tackling tax avoidance.

“If we can protect ordinary families with a higher tax on the banks of course we should.

“I’m not going to pluck a proportion out of the air. What I’m saying is that if I was in government at the moment, I would be looking, whether it’s a tax on the banks or tackling tax avoidance, to lighten the load and the cuts and the impact it’s going to have on ordinary families.”

Mr Miliband must wait until the results of an election of the parliamentary Labour party to learn the make-up of his shadow cabinet, and will only then be able to appoint a shadow chancellor.

Ed Balls, the current shadow education secretary, is keen to take on the role, but his call for delays to spending cuts until growth is more firmly established may concern the new leader.

Mr Miliband’s promise not to oppose the Coalition’s cuts where “sensible” is being interpreted as a sign that he does not favour Mr Balls’ approach.

There are suggestions that his wife, Yvette Cooper, the former work and pensions secretary, could be selected instead.

Another possible shadow chancellor, Sadiq Khan, the shadow transport secretary, used his speech to Labour conference in Manchester to set out his own stall, calling on the Government to avoid spending cuts which would damage the economy in the long-term.

He admitted that Labour would also have had to have carried out cuts if the party had been re-elected.

But he went on: “I can tell you this: we would not fall into the trap of short-termism, making cuts now which would still be holding our country back in 20 years time. We would stand up for ambition and for optimism.

"And, because you don't really get change by tinkering around the edges, that means being prepared to make radical changes as a party to help build a fairer and more prosperous society."

Harriet Harman, the party’s deputy leader, said that taxing the banks would help reduce the deficit and encourage a more responsible financial services industry.

She went on: "I think we have got to get the deficit down but we mustn't do it in a way which threatens the economy and hits the most vulnerable - older people, disabled people.

"One of the things that Ed has suggested is that we do more on the taxing of the banks, the financial services, to make sure that they pay a levy which will make them perhaps be a bit more responsible as well as helping us reduce the deficit."

In an interview with ITV's This Morning, David Cameron rejected Mr Miliband's claim in his conference speech that it was "pessimistic" to insist on immediate spending cuts.

He said: "To say what Ed is saying, and forget about the deficit because it’s somehow pessimistic to talk about it, that would be completely betraying the country.

"If you’re trying to do this job properly, it’s not about being popular, it’s about trying to do what is right.

"I profoundly believe that if we don’t deal with our debts we’ll see interest rates go up, we’ll see confidence come out of the economy, and we’ll see real problems."

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Raise taxes :lol::lol::lol: ,

Labour will be doing a "Foot" .

New Labour had something to offer workers , though Gordon derailed from day one ie Frank Field proposals.

Now we will see the end of Labour as a manifesto offering to raise taxes against this economic backdrop , high

unemployment etc is unelectorable.

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Raise taxes :lol::lol::lol: ,

Labour will be doing a "Foot" .

New Labour had something to offer workers , though Gordon derailed from day one ie Frank Field proposals.

Now we will see the end of Labour as a manifesto offering to raise taxes against this economic backdrop , high

unemployment etc is unelectorable.

Except the public is retarded, didn't you hear the other day? I heard it on the radio anyway whereby labour is now at 42% popularity and tory on 38% while libs are at 12%.

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What is even funnier is over on a labour blog site the faithfull are saying "Now they have got their party back" that Ed The Unready should give Baron Kinnock of Slagheaps a big job in the shadow cabinet.

This is going to be a very slow train wreck.

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I think he's on to a real vote winner here. :blink:

It sort of works.

Con all the public sector sods into not having payrises and then tax them into pay reductions...

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Except the public is retarded, didn't you hear the other day? I heard it on the radio anyway whereby labour is now at 42% popularity and tory on 38% while libs are at 12%.

He who robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend upon the support of Paul.

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He who robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend upon the support of Paul.

He who robs from Peter and Paul's children to pay bankers to lend back to Peter and Paul can depend on the support of both Peter and Paul.

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All this hot air from the Labour party about how to deal with the deficit and debt is irrelevant.

They lost.

And the Tories did not win. A coalition with fair weather friends is not a mandate.

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All this hot air from the Labour party about how to deal with the deficit and debt is irrelevant.

They lost.

That's rather the point isn't it? This stuff is all about internal Labour Party politics, and giving the party base a nice warm feeling of being right, without the problems (or the benefits) of having to try it out in power. It's a "For he's a Jolly Good Fellow" speech, not a manifesto, still less a plan of action.

Actually sensible at this stage of the electoral cycle - re-building the party being stage 1.

db

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And the Tories did not win. A coalition with fair weather friends is not a mandate.

So does mr milliband do it for you?

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And the Tories did not win. A coalition with fair weather friends is not a mandate.

No, but everyone else spent all their election war chest, and the Tories didn't. They don't want another election whilst they're so unpopular, but neither the LibDems nor the Labour Party can afford another election. That too is a form of success.

db

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So does mr milliband do it for you?

Like everyone else, I hardly know him or his values. I do know that he wasn't one of the posh mob at Oxford.

I can say that the New Labour branding did not sit easily with me, but the 'Red Ed' image and warnings of a 'slide' back into far Left politics are unlikely.

Anyone know the Tory timescale for returning our money and the banks into full private ownership and funding?

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No, but everyone else spent all their election war chest, and the Tories didn't. They don't want another election whilst they're so unpopular, but neither the LibDems nor the Labour Party can afford another election. That too is a form of success.

db

Lord Ashcroft who bankrolled the Tories last time won't do it again since they failed to deliver a) a majority B) the benign business environment he needs.

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Don't worry, he's as electable as Neil Kinnock :lol:.

That's a bit unfair.

Kinnock was, back in the day, a decent politician. I didn't agree with many of his views, but he was a competent parliamentarian. A good speaker - far better than either Cameron, Clegg or Miliband - and not afraid to stand up to idiots like Derek Hatton. Kinnock suffered unfairly at the hands of the Murdoch press.

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"We should look to do more from taxation. For example, taking more from banks or tackling tax avoidance," he said. "If I was in government at the moment, I would be looking - whether it is a tax on the banks or tackling tax avoidance - to lighten the load and the cuts and the impact that it is going to have on ordinary families. I would do more from taxation than Alistair proposed in his plan."

Cant say I disagree with that.

A 0.05 financial transactions Robin Hood tax on the city would go a long way towards cutting the deficit.

The least they could do I would have thought.

Miliband signals tax rise policy

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SBN of HPC: I would not have attacked Russia If I had been Hitler

But there's more chance of me going back in time 60 years and scratching a lonely testicle than there is of this turnip dictating taxation policy in the near future.

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Yeah, tax the banks.

Because they won't widen their margins at all, will they?

Anyone notice how, when it's the wealth of the great unwashed a wonderful transparency of law can be observed- we now hear that the linking of pensions to RPI inflation is being 'reviewed'.

But when it comes to the wealth of the wealthy an iron curtain of legal impregnability descends, or, as above, threats are made to extract revenge upon the public.

Fred the shreds pension was inviolate we are told, protected by the full weight of contract law- joe bloggs pension, on the other hand, is being 'reviewed', despite being supposedly sheltered behind that same contract law.

At what point does the truth dawn that the entire apparatus of state has been suborned to serve the interest of a minority?

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At what point does the truth dawn that the entire apparatus of state has been suborned to serve the interest of a minority?

I think that the glowing fiery ball of that particular truth rose above the mountains of mystery many millennia ago. Unfortunately, as today, the majority of people did not turn to feel the sun on their faces. - they turned instead to watch Soooo sn B'oyle getting mounted by P eeet rendrey because it was more important and relevant to the tribe at the time.

in eeet

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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