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Too Much Demand ?

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Guest wrongmove

Thanks to Calcaria on TMF for this link

TOO MANY NEW HOUSES BUILT

BURTON’s housing boom appears to have come to a halt after council bosses unveiled plans to block new developments in the town over fears that supply is outstripping demand.

Plans for hundreds of new homes across the town will be thrown out after East Staffordshire Borough Council unveiled proposals to introduce a housing moratorium on applications for 10 or more properties.

The projects likely to be blocked include major housing developments proposed for 119 apartments at the site of Spirit Group, in Station Street; 43 homes on the site of West Street Carpets, in Guild Street; 21 homes at Mead Works, in Horninglow Street; 37 homes in Park Street, and outline applications for developments at Stanyon and Holmes, in Dallow Bridge; Bond End, Yoxall; the former Winshill Infants School site and land behind Briggs of Burton, in Derby Street....

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Damn.. let them carry on.. as a buyer supply outstripping demand is a good thing..

It is in exeter..

New devlopments are getting desperate..

going to pop in and offer to cover their costs on a property..

Well some money is better then none..

and these things.. well bless them..

If I am polite, make an offer..

see what I can see.

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Guest wrongmove
Damn.. let them carry on.. as a buyer supply outstripping demand is a good thing..

I agree - the council didn't intervene to prevent price hikes, as far as I know. It is not their job to make markets.

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Can we not contact burton council or make a big sing song out of this.

If they are able to do this then other councils will also so the same.

Is it actually in their best interests to stop buildings though??

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Stockport have been turning down plans for a while which don't "add something extra" - ie: horrid little flats get rejected.

The concern is that unfinished building sites will be left as happened last time..

looks messy..

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Damn.. let them carry on.. as a buyer supply outstripping demand is a good thing..

Except that this has been very damaging to some towns and cities. Take Glasgow as an example. Many fine buildings have been destroyed with remarkable enthusiasm after suspicious fires, minor internal collapses or no reason at all and are, surprise surprise, replaced with awful modern 'luxury apartments', where the external wood panelling bleaches out and starts to rot in no time.

There's going to be a lot of future eyesore slums like the 60s high-rise experiments, which started so full of hope and ended with p*sh-stained lifts, graffiti and other crime, before being demolished, having been accepted as an abject failure of social experimentation.

The problem is that we're not talking about a few massive buildings concentrated together, but 'luxury' developments all over the place.

Then we'll all look back and wonder where our fantastic Victorian architecture disappeared to.

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Except that this has been very damaging to some towns and cities.  Take Glasgow as an example.  Many fine buildings have been destroyed with remarkable enthusiasm after suspicious fires, minor internal collapses or no reason at all and are, surprise surprise, replaced with awful modern 'luxury apartments', where the external wood panelling bleaches out and starts to rot in no time.

There's going to be a lot of future eyesore slums like the 60s high-rise experiments, which started so full of hope and ended with p*sh-stained lifts, graffiti and other crime, before being demolished, having been accepted as an abject failure of social experimentation.

The problem is that we're not talking about a few massive buildings concentrated together, but 'luxury' developments all over the place.

Then we'll all look back and wonder where our fantastic Victorian architecture disappeared to.

I have personally seen an "executive apartment" block turn inside two years to mostly rented and already scruffy flats..

The percieved value has not dropped yet.. But it will.

in close nit communities the quality is important.. and is not there in new builds..

Exterior "trim" is shody and wears quickly.

Also as they are rented out they become filled with young men flat sharing..

I am a young man.. but I don't want to be surrounded by them..

Rentals cannot sustain values as the quality of the tennants is variable and also the concern a tennant has for their environment can be very low..

The flats became an unpleasent, dirty and shody place to live.

and the value used to be £280,000.. which is £140,000 more than equal sized flats in smaller blocks with more space.. and these are more "owner occupied"

Modern developments.. I wouldn't choose to live there.. and they cost more.

These will and have devalued already.

One in the block I refer to has never been sold.. another has been on the market for 9 months and no viewings..

market collapses..

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Except that this has been very damaging to some towns and cities.  Take Glasgow as an example.  Many fine buildings have been destroyed with remarkable enthusiasm after suspicious fires, minor internal collapses or no reason at all and are, surprise surprise, replaced with awful modern 'luxury apartments', where the external wood panelling bleaches out and starts to rot in no time.

Who in their right minds thought that wood panelling would suit Glasgow's climate? Blocks which have only been built in the last few years are already looking worse for wear, but there is no sign of architects realising this as new builds continue to use the same type of wood. One new development of social housing has built the bedrooms into a point, so that it is impossible to fit a bed in them - these architects should be forced to join the real world at some point!

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  • 341 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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