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Solutions Part Two

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http://www.oftwominds.com/blogsept10/solutions-P2-09-10.html

Dependency on the State has crippled large segments of America, creating a culture of destructive addiction, entitlement and dishonesty that precludes enterprise, thrift and thus upward mobility.

Though Central State entitlements were designed to alleviate poverty and spread opportunity, they have had the perverse consequence of undermining the cultural ecology of enterprise which fuels upward mobility.

The long, oft-times difficult Federal effort to eliminate officially and culturally sanctioned prejudice and poverty and encourage integration has largely been successful in formalized America, but it has also had unintended consequences.

It has been successful in the Armed Forces, the government and in enlightened Corporate America. But outside these strongholds of rules and regulations, America remains highly segregated financially and ethnically. This is a verboten topic because it doesn't fit with the "official" ideology of a desegregated, upwardly mobile melting-pot society.

I know this is painful and difficult for us as a people. We prefer to believe that upward mobility (and by extension, melting-pot integration) is not just possible but inevitable, as long as "the government" "helps out" and "increases opportunity."

The terrible irony is that some aspects of "government help" have unwittingly crippled the very spirit of enterprise needed to power upward mobility by reinforcing and rewarding dependency and addiction.

The two are psychological siblings. Addicts fear the absence or withdrawal of the one "source of life" they have come to depend on to function. It can be wine, whiskey, smack (heroin), synthetic smack (oxycontin etc.), cocaine, sex, gambling, online porn, and so on.

The key trait of addiction is the atrophying of all other sources of well-being, self-worth, and stability. Almost by definition, a healthy human being draws upon a rich network of spiritual, psychological and material/financial resources; a healthy life is constructed like a pyramid, with a broad base of people who they care about and interact with, sources of income, "social capital," skillsets, and a value system which nurtures enterprise, thrift and security.

Small business is inherently reciprocal. You have to provide services and supply goods of the value promised, with integrity, or your business will be avoided by others.

........

In contrast, State-dependent enterprises don't require anything but revolving-door contacts within the Pentagon, NSA, Medicare, etc. This is not "free market" capitalism, it is State/Corporate crony capitalism.

Crony capitalism is like an addict: if the Central State withers, so do the crony-capitalist "enterprises." All these businesses are "Federal entrepreneurs," totally dependent on State contracts, contacts and swag for their survival.

Total dependence on the State is a key trait not just of Crony Corporate Capitalism but also of Third World kleptocracies (which is why the U.S. is also a kleptocracy in key ways). Both are partnerships of the State and privately controlled cartels which skim much of the national income and redistribute it to their own benefit.

.........

What we as a society and economy need to do is offer "help" in building enterprise, reciprocity, adaptability, self-confidence and integrity. Never-ending entitlements erode every part of the foundation of long-term security and prosperity, and incentivize every negative aspect of dependency and addiction.

More good stuff from the oftwominds blog.

(Though I'd say he's being a bit naïve thinking that the consequences are unintended.)

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http://www.oftwominds.com/blogsept10/solutions-P2-09-10.html

More good stuff from the oftwominds blog.

(Though I'd say he's being a bit naïve thinking that the consequences are unintended.)

The US is hardly known for its generous social security problems.

But wait, there is an elephant in the room. They do spend a lot on social security. And nearly all of it goes on pensioners.

Cutting benefits back to unemployed people who would be better off working aint gonna help matters much, unless you want a few riots which could turn nasty.

The real problem is pensions. They cant be afforded in America. They cant be afforded anywhere in the developed world. If the governments of the world try and enforce their payment, by raising onerous taxes on the working population, they risk being swept away on a wave of default, riot, bankruptcy and revolution.

The inter-generational war is hotting up.

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The US is hardly known for its generous social security problems.

But wait, there is an elephant in the room. They do spend a lot on social security. And nearly all of it goes on pensioners.

Cutting benefits back to unemployed people who would be better off working aint gonna help matters much, unless you want a few riots which could turn nasty.

The real problem is pensions. They cant be afforded in America. They cant be afforded anywhere in the developed world. If the governments of the world try and enforce their payment, by raising onerous taxes on the working population, they risk being swept away on a wave of default, riot, bankruptcy and revolution.

The inter-generational war is hotting up.

I thought the point of the OP was that it's the government itself, the large corporations which has fallen into addiction.

Pensions and benefits are small beer compared to total corporate/state spending, but the same problem applies - addiction to an easy way out over actual long term solutions.

I could be wrong of course.

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  • 261 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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