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Gordon Brown: Uk And Us Must Coordinate Economic Policy

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/economics/8021963/Gordon-Brown-UK-and-US-must-coordinate-economic-policy.html

Gordon Brown has warned that America and Europe risk a decade of high unemployment and low growth unless new policies are urgently taken to improve global co-operation.

In his first major speech since losing the election in May, the former Prime Minister called for the establishment of a global financial constitution that sets out clear rules for banks, and urged that major powers begin to co-ordinate global economic policy.

"The question is where are the jobs going to come from and where's the growth going to come from," Mr Brown said in the Malcolm Wiener Lecture in Political Economy at Harvard University on Thursday.

In a veiled swipe at the deficit measures announced by the Coalition government, Mr Brown said that "there's insufficient evidence that economies are growing strongly enough to take risks with the recovery."

A sustained global recovery will require countries to give up thinking about policy along national lines, Mr Brown said, or we will face a "race to the bottom" as countries compete with ever lower wages.

America and Europe's reliance on the import of cheap goods from Asia has taken some of the blame for the financial crisis and subsequent downturn.

"If every country thinks they can export their way out - that can't happen," Mr Brown told an audience of students at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, where he has spent the past week as a visiting fellow.

The former Prime Minister, who has kept a low profile since leaving Downing Street, argued that a financial constitution was required to help ensure that "markets have morals".

American leadership, he said, will be needed on financial regulation and economic policy to avoid people forgetting about the causes of the crisis and "leaving the issues on the table."

The former Prime Minister has spent a week on a visiting fellowship at Harvard University, one of America's most prestigious and wealthiest institutions.

Mr Brown has long been mooted as a potential head of a multilateral institution, such as the International Monetary Fund or the World Bank.

Though blamed in the UK for the recession, he remains highly regarded among international policy makers. The government's decision to buy stakes in Royal Bank of Scotland and Lloyds Banking Group at the height of the banking crisis stabilised financial markets and was seen as a step ahead of the response in the US.

Words of immense wisdom from probably the worlds greatest leader....

Clearly Brown's plan wasn't for the UK to export it's way out of the mess we where just going to print ever more free funny money to fund govt spending. It was a fool proof way to create the worlds greatest recovery.

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"The question is where are the jobs going to come from and where's the growth going to come from,"

Well if he doesn't know the answer now how the **** did he expect to know it if 'we''d re-elected him?.

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Our dickwad government under Brown and the Bankrupt of England already have follwoed the US to the point of bankrupty and the removal of what remains of any productive enterprise in the country.

That is why we are in the mess we are in already.

More QE vicar?

Edited by OnlyMe

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From the man who could not take a leak and coordinate his c--k to stop more going on the floor than in the jonney.

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Nurse!!

He seems to be suggesting we all gang up on China and give them a good kicking.

If he is, then it's the most sensible thing I've ever heard him utter.

Unfortunately, I dare say that had he been giving the lecture in Beijing he'd be telling them it all started in America.

The man's just so...............irrelevant.

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Mr Brown has long been mooted as a potential head of a multilateral institution, such as the International Monetary Fund or the World Bank.

A terrifying thought, if they were relevant.

Edited by bogbrush

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A sustained global recovery will require countries to give up thinking about policy along national lines

In other words Brown wants a one world government , the man is bonkers.

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"The question is where are the jobs going to come from and where's the growth going to come from,"

He's admitting the bubble's burst and his housing boom is well over.

Edited by billybong

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I have no idea who this person is...but the word "Moot" is interesting:

moot (moomacr.gift)n.1. Law A hypothetical case argued by law students as an exercise.2. An ancient English meeting, especially a representative meeting of the freemen of a shire.tr.v. moot·ed, moot·ing, moots 1. a. To bring up as a subject for discussion or debate.b. To discuss or debate. See Synonyms at broach1.2. Law To plead or argue (a case) in a moot court.adj.1. Subject to debate; arguable: a moot question.2. a. Law Without legal significance, through having been previously decided or settled.b. Of no practical importance; irrelevant.[Middle English, meeting, from Old English momacr.gift, gemomacr.gift.]mootprime.gifness n.Usage Note: The adjective moot is originally a legal term going back to the mid-16th century. It derives from the noun moot, in its sense of a hypothetical case argued as an exercise by law students. Consequently, a moot question is one that is arguable or open to debate. But in the mid-19th century people also began to look at the hypothetical side of moot as its essential meaning, and they started to use the word to mean "of no significance or relevance." Thus, a moot point, however debatable, is one that has no practical value. A number of critics have objected to this use, but 59 percent of the Usage Panel accepts it in the sentence The nominee himself chastised the White House for failing to do more to support him, but his concerns became moot when a number of Republicans announced that they, too, would oppose the nomination. When using moot one should be sure that the context makes clear which sense is meant.

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Gordon Brown: Uk And Us Must Coordinate Economic Policy

Beware! He is referring to synchronised toilet flushing.

It wont work. Never mind the constant refusal of the USA to get in line & adopt GMT, they also cannot spell synchronised.

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I wonder who he might imagine would lead and shape the policies of such a government?

It can't be him, he has a full time job representing his constituents in the Commons... hold on.... oh dear, he hasn't set foot in the Commons since getting booted out of office... :rolleyes:.

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We buy the US bonds (with money we've freshly printed) and the US buys our bonds (with money it's freshly printed). Isn't that enough coordination? :lol:

Edited by Errol

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/economics/8021963/Gordon-Brown-UK-and-US-must-coordinate-economic-policy.html

Words of immense wisdom from probably the worlds greatest leader....

Clearly Brown's plan wasn't for the UK to export it's way out of the mess we where just going to print ever more free funny money to fund govt spending. It was a fool proof way to create the worlds greatest recovery.

Did people actually pay to listen to him?

Now if there were a one to one debate against / with say Marc Faber ............... I'd pay good money to hear that.

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Did people actually pay to listen to him?

Now if there were a one to one debate against / with say Marc Faber ............... I'd pay good money to hear that.

Think it said the audience were students. That would be Brown's correct level. Not sure he's up to university students though - high school would probably be more appropriate.

His message - build 'growth' for 48 consecutive quarters (the longest period of successive growth in our history) - based on a massive increase in consumer debt at a time when globalization meant the inflationary pressures from loose credit were offset by deflationary pressure from cheap imports - and tax that growth to the hilt to employ another million people in the public sector - would surely be seen through by a 15 year old.

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In other words Brown wants a one world government , the man is bonkers.

No. He did not call for that. Everything he said was sensible and consistant with his efforts to co-ordinate a multi-national response to the BANKING crisis.

Economic measures have more effect if they work with, rather than against, other countries approaches.

As Camoron seems to have taken his lead from Ireland, this is a solution which needs intelligence, obviously.

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I have no idea who this person is...but the word "Moot" is interesting:

moot (moomacr.gift)n.1. Law A hypothetical case argued by law students as an exercise.2. An ancient English meeting, especially a representative meeting of the freemen of a shire.tr.v. moot·ed, moot·ing, moots 1. a. To bring up as a subject for discussion or debate.b. To discuss or debate. See Synonyms at broach1.2. Law To plead or argue (a case) in a moot court.adj.1. Subject to debate; arguable: a moot question.2. a. Law Without legal significance, through having been previously decided or settled.b. Of no practical importance; irrelevant.[Middle English, meeting, from Old English momacr.gift, gemomacr.gift.]mootprime.gifness n.Usage Note: The adjective moot is originally a legal term going back to the mid-16th century. It derives from the noun moot, in its sense of a hypothetical case argued as an exercise by law students. Consequently, a moot question is one that is arguable or open to debate. But in the mid-19th century people also began to look at the hypothetical side of moot as its essential meaning, and they started to use the word to mean "of no significance or relevance." Thus, a moot point, however debatable, is one that has no practical value. A number of critics have objected to this use, but 59 percent of the Usage Panel accepts it in the sentence The nominee himself chastised the White House for failing to do more to support him, but his concerns became moot when a number of Republicans announced that they, too, would oppose the nomination. When using moot one should be sure that the context makes clear which sense is meant.

Didn't you read Lord of the Rings?

Entmoot......much like a public quango.

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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