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One In Three Call Centre Workers Is A Graduate

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Two in five call centre bosses reported seeing a surge in applications from graduates, particularly over the past 12 months

Surely this is missleading and a lie of omission? Any call center jobs I ever saw advertised a couple of years back all required a degree. Or maybe that was just IT support I didn't look at others.

Whether or not it was the case two years ago, it's probably the case now that you need a degree just to work in a call center. If I was living in the UK looking for a job I'd rather work in a supermarket than a call centre, but apparantly getting a full-time job in a supermarket these days is hard since all the supermarkets are getting more part-time staff in plus all the competition.

Edited by Saberu

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This is only shocking because most people over 35 see a graduate as being some sort of elite. When, as now, simply being a graduate means nothing more than you are of average intelligence and abilities, we should not regard it as shocking.

All just symptomatic of allowing educational inflation to run rampant and unchecked for 20 odd years, IMHO.

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I thought Labour's drive to get non-academic people going to university was a cynical move to do the following:

Reduce youth unemployment

Create jobs in the education sector funded through student loans paying the fees

Increase spending by giving students loans to buy stereos, cars, what have you

Accustom people to taking on debt

It does a lot of people no good at all to have a degree if you look at it in career terms. In my line (finance) professional qualifications are required for the higher grades but nobody needs a degree. I usually recruit clever people who often have a non-relevant degree from a good uni, which I would always take over a business degree from somewhere rubbish, but that's because clever people usually do a degree. Media Studies and MBAs tend to go in the bin; though for different reasons. Media Studies people are thick and lazy and MBAs often do damage because they try to apply the latest bizarre mid-west management theory.

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I thought Labour's drive to get non-academic people going to university was a cynical move to do the following:

Reduce youth unemployment

Create jobs in the education sector funded through student loans paying the fees

Increase spending by giving students loans to buy stereos, cars, what have you

Accustom people to taking on debt

It does a lot of people no good at all to have a degree if you look at it in career terms. In my line (finance) professional qualifications are required for the higher grades but nobody needs a degree. I usually recruit clever people who often have a non-relevant degree from a good uni, which I would always take over a business degree from somewhere rubbish, but that's because clever people usually do a degree. Media Studies and MBAs tend to go in the bin; though for different reasons. Media Studies people are thick and lazy and MBAs often do damage because they try to apply the latest bizarre mid-west management theory.

We had this guy come in who was a self styled marketing genius. His idea was to buy a mailing list from a dodgy company and spam it. When I pointed out that this was an awful idea and he would destroy the credibility of the brand so we would not be doing it he said 'but I've got an MBA!'

He was also a sex pest.

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This is only shocking because most people over 35 see a graduate as being some sort of elite. When, as now, simply being a graduate means nothing more than you are of average intelligence and abilities, we should not regard it as shocking.

All just symptomatic of allowing educational inflation to run rampant and unchecked for 20 odd years, IMHO.

heres a good excerpt from The dying of money in 1973

In the same way that inflation overstimulated useless activity and dampened true production, inflation had a way of turning all values upside down and all principles inside out. The least useful activities were the most rewarding, and vice versa. Skilled workers were steadily less well compensated in relation to unskilled workers, and there was therefore a chronic and worsening shortage of skilled workers. In the midst of vast spurious employment and considerable outright unemployment, fewer and fewer people could be found to do the useful work, while there were always plenty of applicants for the useless places. Humble economic activities which were nice to have available in their day were simply too humble for the era of the big money and could no longer be carried on in America. Every man can think of his own examples. Useless activities took their place.

On the other hand, there were different kinds of activities, likewise unqualifiedly good in their natural state, which did not disappear but became so overstimulated and overgrown in the inflationary distortion as to become a diseased growth of another sort. Education and law were two good examples in the American inflation.

One must tread softly before finding anything so priceless as education to be useless in any manifestation; and one may find himself forced back on the impersonal rule that what is useful is that which exists without any artificial stimulation. After the exercise of all due caution, one finds the hypertrophy of American education in the inflation still glaringly real. The government had decided that if education was good, more education must be that much better. Expenditure on education increased twofold by $30 billion from 1960 to 1968. Employment in education increased by 1.7 million jobs. Higher education alone increased by $14.4 billion, and the percentage of students among the age brackets from 18 to 34 increased by two-thirds, representing 3.4 million more students. But education appeared to represent more activity and less learning than ever before. Education provided occupation for millions of man-years of effort for which the system had no other immediate use, not only of students, faculty and staff but even of construction workers who built the dormitories and classrooms, but that was about all the educational activity seemed to do. The government and the educational system encouraged every young American of every race and every intellectual endowment, or lack of it, to think that higher education was for him. As a result, the educational system found itself flooded with unqualified, uninterested, and disaffected students who demanded relevance from an institution that had always been luxuriously free from any obligation to be relevant; who were insulated by education from ever discovering what the real sources of social wealth were; and many of whom were progressively incapacitated by education from ever filling a productive place, thus becoming transformed by education into the excess baggage of society. To the two old kinds of education, which were enabling education and purely enlightening education, America added a third kind which was disabling education. In the end, the overpriced, overpaid, and overexpanded educational system found itself in deep financial trouble which was held at bay only by the government’s constantly continuing inflation.

The hypertrophy of law was somewhat similar. No nobler creation ever sprang from the mind of man than the institution of law, but law is still a social overhead. It creates no wealth directly, although it does lubricate the cogwheels of the economic and social system that does create wealth. Beyond doing that, law can become useless and even a hindrance, and that is what it became in the American inflation. The proliferation of laws, legislation, regulation, litigation, and legal calculation exceeded any imaginable assaying of its worth. Complexity alone in law is pure waste, and every new development in American law increased its complexity and decreased its utility. General litigiousness abounded. New rights of legal action sprang into existence daily. Judges and legislators felt themselves deifically capable of rectifying all un-happiness with some kind of legal right of one person against another. No grievance was too absurd to be heard, but the principal effect of hearing each new one was to call forth a thousand more. Every person can choose his own favorite examples of puerile legal contention, among them these: prayers in schools, constitutional rights of clothing and haircuts in schools, rules of conduct in schools, busing in schools, non-busing in schools, constitutional rights not to be disciplined, graded, judged or restrained from any act, sex discrimination, age discrimination, discrimination against the poor, discrimination against the incompetent, every other imaginable kind of discrimination, obscenity as free speech, evasion of the civic duties of military service, electoral redistricting, labor disputes, rent strikes, freeing criminals for abstract mistakes in procedure, tort liabilities far in excess of any injury that money could make good, securities law liabilities redistributing losses and winnings among the players in the casino, antitrust prohibitions against routinely innocuous business practices, general harassment of the industrial system that supported us all, and so on. The American legal world was a weird one. It gave occupation and amusement to the participants, but not much more. Going so far afield, perhaps it really sought to improve the general sense of justice, but it was enough to prove that one man’s justice is merely another man’s injustice and that the pursuit of universal justice is pursuit of a chimera.

Nothing new under the sun, the same mistakes over and over again, good old inflation, good old government, our leaders follow a tried and tested map, inflate, reap the benefits of the false good times and leave the following carnage and hatred to the next poor schlep in office (in this case it was Nixon, very popular guy if you ask the average American, oh no that was Kennedy the guy whos policies introduced the dormant inflation)

Edited by Tamara De Lempicka

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This is only shocking because most people over 35 see a graduate as being some sort of elite.

I think it's only really people over 45, and even then the elite status is starting to wane. To me (aged 38) graduate simply means "debt monkey" and "hierarchical thinker" in alternate measures.

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Guest UK Debt Slave

This is only shocking because most people over 35 see a graduate as being some sort of elite. When, as now, simply being a graduate means nothing more than you are of average intelligence and abilities, we should not regard it as shocking.

All just symptomatic of allowing educational inflation to run rampant and unchecked for 20 odd years, IMHO.

A* grades for borderline illiterate morons

Another quite stunning NuFascist success ;)

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One in two people are supposed to be graduates, many jobs are in call centres of one sort or another, its not surprising. The only thing that is surprising is that anyone thinks its a good thing, or indeed necessary for over half of people to spend nearly a third of their life in education and go to university. Unfortunately the liebour party is full of them.

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A* grades for borderline illiterate morons

Another quite stunning NuFascist success ;)

Come on youve got to give the Tories some credit here also.

I was thrown out of my 2nd HighSchool in 1991 as i was one of the schools elite badboys, and later that year still managed to pass 5 GCSE's (1C 3D's and an F), despite not handing in all coursework ..... The Tories were the ones who started the everyone is an achiever excuse for an education system.

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My first proper job after UNi was in a banks call centre. I took the opportunity to take the finance eams they were offering and extricate myself as soon as Id passed. I then went on to do further finance/vocational exams to ensure I never ended up back there.

This was 10 years ago though I must admit its been tempting to apply for these sorts of jobs again, given the dearth of 'proper' jobs.

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This is only shocking because most people over 35 see a graduate as being some sort of elite. When, as now, simply being a graduate means nothing more than you are of average intelligence and abilities, we should not regard it as shocking.

All just symptomatic of allowing educational inflation to run rampant and unchecked for 20 odd years, IMHO.

It's a familiar argument, but very well summarised General.

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It's been like this for years. This country doesn't need 100s of thousands of grads every year. It's a scam:

These people are part of the UK "Educonomy". The Educonomy supports millions of jobs directly and indirectly.

Edited by Home_To_Roost

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We had this guy come in who was a self styled marketing genius. His idea was to buy a mailing list from a dodgy company and spam it. When I pointed out that this was an awful idea and he would destroy the credibility of the brand so we would not be doing it he said 'but I've got an MBA!'

He was also a sex pest.

:D

That's MBAs for you! I left one company because the boss had read one business theory book too many and started bringing in this Harvard Business School nonsense. I wasn't the only senior guy to walk, basically the good ones got out and left him and the nodding numpties to it. They had to merge with a decent company a couple of years later after his idiocy had wrecked it. Shame as before he got into that stuff he was excellent.

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There aren't enough graduate jobs and there haven't been for over ten years. It's just that the media has only just noticed.

Everyone I know is severely underemployed and has been since they graduated. The only thing mopping them up has been emigration and the public sector. If not for that, we would have had protests well before now.

It's rubbish. Everyone I know knows it but everyone tries to put a brave face on. But it gets hard trying to keep a strained fixed smile on your face, and pretend that "you just need that bit more motivation" and "you have to take your life and steer it right" and "you need to blast through those brick walls" when you know that, in reality, the odds are stacked against you.

I've been conning myself this way for years, but it gets harder every year to lie to myself and "overcome those negative perspectives".

You know why Americans are so big for self-help and "The Secret" and all that malarky? Because they need to con themselves that they have control over their circumstances; otherwise, they'd probably implode.

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Don't know what the fuss is about tbh it's always been like this. I was a grad who started in a call centre. It's hardly where I am now!

One day I just woke up thought "what was the point of going to Uni if all I'm doing now is playing video games and drinking beer all day?"

Actually, looking back maybe I was living the dream! :lol:

So that very day I hopped on a bus to the job centre, got an interview the next day and started the following Monday, not many yrs ago as well I might add. To my surprise there were already a couple of guys from my course working there as well.

These jobs are just 'starter' jobs for grads. The 'lifers' in these jobs are those people who aren't University educated or don't have a trade/other marketable skill.

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Judging by the reactions to MBAs on here, I think I'll read some introductory material on it to grasp the basics, and forget about paying for the whole degree!

Besides, you can probably work your way up into a management role if yuo want, right? No need for an MBA if you know the company well from the inside.

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Unfortunately qualification inflation has led to a new type of apprenticeship - the intern. With everyone having the same qualifications it is now often down to your connections and your ability to work for free for an extended period that dictate your progress as a recent graduate. Rather than increase social mobility this has made it harder for some to get on.

Perhaps you would like to work for a famous global fashion brand I know? As a recent graduate with buckets of enthusiasm you may be lucky enough to get a 3-month intern placement at £50 a week - not enough to buy two of the company's T-shirts. (This company is based in Central London). If you've done really really well then you might be kept on for another season (3 months) at £150 a week. A friend and manager at this company justifies this by saying that she started in the industry the same way many years ago. She doesn't see the difference that when she did it she was a 16-year-old school leave with virtually no qualifications, not a 23 year old with £20,000 in debt. At any one time approximately 50% of the sales team are interns. As my friend says, the team couldn't function without the interns. Almost without exception the interns are let go after a maximum of 6 months.

I know countless media, fashion, lifestyle etc companies that do exactly the same. Personally I think the practice should be illegal. I have no problem with a formal apprenticeship which pays a subsistence wage with the prospect of full-time employment if you shape up, but that's a whole different thing to global multinational expecting to have their wage bill subsidised by the debts of young, enthusiastic people.

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Screen+shot+2010-09-21+at+7.28.36+AM.png

From the US but the UK situation must be similar or even worse. Profits are increasingly coming from abroad which is a result, at least in part, of outsourcing. And when a factory is built abroad rather than here its not just the grunts doing manual labour who lose out but all those who might have provided technical, engineering and managerial expertise.

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Unfortunately qualification inflation has led to a new type of apprenticeship - the intern.

In fact, you could almost say that the businesses in question have branched out into the education business and opened up a post graduate training facility, offering advance, hands-on courses in their specialty.

Now, if people were willing to pay tens of thousands of pounds to academics to teach them the simple basics of a profession that they want to buy their way into, why should they then not pay the real professionals to learn the 'real stuff' hands? And they are not even charging hard cash like the universities but even pay their students for learning experience with them but are making a profit even whilst teaching them.

Given that the meat of most degrees can be picked up by simply worming one's way through a reading list, what stops business from selling the knowledge in place of the universities far cheaper than the university ever could?

In fact, there is root of the problem. Most unis actual goods handed over to the clients consists of a reading list and more or less personalised feedback that is mainly useless and horribly overpriced for what it is. Unis simply don't have anything to sell other than a bogus certification that has been devalued drastically in recent years.

Oh, also see: http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/are-american-universities-going-the-way-of-general-motors/

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  • 152 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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