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workhou

Thinking Of Studying Software Development Ma

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I've had discussions and heard from a few software/website developers on this site and I need your input on this one. I need experienced people who work in web/software development to give me some advice here.

I'm currently building a website 'business' but the scale of the task in front of me is daunting but I'm still pretty motivated. To start well I've been studying books/videos on PHP and mySQL to help built on my programming and database knowledge.

I looked at this MA course and I feel it would be very useful for me as I develop my website whilst at the same time give me something I can show employers?

I worked as a data analyst years ago so I have knowledge of Microsoft Access, Impromptu which seems to use a similar query language to mySQL. I wasn't the best data analyst in the world but I came in only with nominal Microsoft Access and Excel skills. I done a marketing degree at university for my sins and it didn't really prepare me for the data analyst job. I'm VERY wary about doing further degrees after my last experience.

I'm currently working in Seoul as a ESL teacher. I reckon I could bang out a few modules complimenting my website business but is it worth it?

So what I want to know is, how respected is this degree in industry? Or, are there other cheaper/better ways to get recognition?

Here's the course details: -

http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/qualification/f26.htm

Thanks for your time.

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A friend of mine used to teach this course for the OU - he is a brilliant developer.

I won't go into detail but this is, IMPO, probably not the course you need to do and, again IMPO, I doubt that any such course would actually help you. If anything, it would simply add additional stress and hassle to something which can also be very stressful to learn IMPO.

I have read your previous posts on starting this website business and, IMPO, you are adopting a very old-fashioned attitude to it - IMPO you are trying to do something that is now out of date in terms of website development. The 'net has moved on.

Someone else mentioned you using wordpress and you really need to invetigate the tools that are available in this, IMPO, current sector of where websites now are. You mention Access - heck, even the numptiest know that Access, while it can be a good basis for creating a DB and exporting it to a RDMS, is not the thing to use online due to the limitations of Access.

Learn about wordpress, use the many freely thousands of apps availalbe to build your website and tie it into e-commerce - move on with your idea and life. Where you are going now IMPO just leads to a world of grief, stress and wasted time but, heck, that is just my opinion.

This is not business nor website nor educational nor financial advice.

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This is not business nor website nor educational nor financial advice.

Ha!

Pardon my ignorance and thanks for the help. I downloaded word press trying to suss it out now. Cheers!

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I've had discussions and heard from a few software/website developers on this site and I need your input on this one. I need experienced people who work in web/software development to give me some advice here.

I'm currently building a website 'business' but the scale of the task in front of me is daunting but I'm still pretty motivated. To start well I've been studying books/videos on PHP and mySQL to help built on my programming and database knowledge.

I looked at this MA course and I feel it would be very useful for me as I develop my website whilst at the same time give me something I can show employers?

I worked as a data analyst years ago so I have knowledge of Microsoft Access, Impromptu which seems to use a similar query language to mySQL. I wasn't the best data analyst in the world but I came in only with nominal Microsoft Access and Excel skills. I done a marketing degree at university for my sins and it didn't really prepare me for the data analyst job. I'm VERY wary about doing further degrees after my last experience.

I'm currently working in Seoul as a ESL teacher. I reckon I could bang out a few modules complimenting my website business but is it worth it?

So what I want to know is, how respected is this degree in industry? Or, are there other cheaper/better ways to get recognition?

Here's the course details: -

http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/qualification/f26.htm

Thanks for your time.

I've just signed up to do this...its six modules to complete http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/qualification/c39.htm

I've signed up to the first module which is £230. If it's a load of rubbish, I won't do the other 5 modules, and just put it down to experience... I'm looking to finish off my degree in S/W development (via a credit transfer). THe OU's main focus is Java. There is a .NET course, but I don't know how decent it is..

Is wordpress completely XHTML compliant? Is it strict or transitional?

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I've just signed up to do this...its six modules to complete http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/qualification/c39.htm

I've signed up to the first module which is £230. If it's a load of rubbish, I won't do the other 5 modules, and just put it down to experience... I'm looking to finish off my degree in S/W development (via a credit transfer). THe OU's main focus is Java. There is a .NET course, but I don't know how decent it is..

Is wordpress completely XHTML compliant? Is it strict or transitional?

The domain website go daddy that I signed up with don't offer wordpress as part of the package I bought. Trying to work something out. Don't know.

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hi workhou. I think tmt is right. You need to work out why you want to do the course. If it is just to learn to build this website then it doesnt seem like the best idea.

Check out those freelancer links someone put up on the last thread. There are thousands of experts who can do everything for you.

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hi workhou. I think tmt is right. You need to work out why you want to do the course. If it is just to learn to build this website then it doesnt seem like the best idea.

Agreed.

Check out those freelancer links someone put up on the last thread. There are thousands of experts who can do everything for you.

Which raises the question that has caused so much trouble to businesses getting onto the web. Without their own expertise, how are they to tell the difference between an expert and a charlatan in the jobs market?

There are a few tell-tale signs you can check for. Anyone who promises "wysiwyg" is dangerously ignorant[1], and if they claim to offer SEO they're actively evil[2]. You could raise these subjects and see how they react, but that probably won't help much if you're not equipped to follow their reply.

[1] there's no such thing as wysiwyg on the web - different people see very different renditions of the same site, and that's by design.

[2] spammers by another name.

[edit - tyop]

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I have a 1st in Computer Science from a well thought of university.

It helped me to get a job, but it taught me very few useful skills, either business-wise or technically. If it weren't for the fact that I needed it to get a job, I would consider it a complete waste of time.

Now, 4 years after graduating, my opinion is that if you want a well paying and varied career in IT, you should aim not to market yourself as a 'code monkey' (because that can be easily outsourced), but as someone who understands businesses and can provide 'business service' of sorts alongside knowing the technical stuff, if that makes any sense.

As for whether it's worth doing a degree, I think it will probably help you get your foot in the door somewhere - getting the initial experience will be the difficult part. I notice you are 33, and I feel terrible saying this since 33 is still young, but I imagine alot of companies out there probably wouldn't give your CV a second thought amongst the piles of eager (i.e. happy to work long hours for no extra pay) 21 year olds appliying - am I alone in thinking this? I may just have a biased view based on the recruitment habits of the company I work for. However, this is where your could make your data analyst experience and even your marketing degree work for you - its all about knowing how to sell yourself.

Don't do this degree without a plan - think of the kind of companies that you want to apply to and find out, firsthand if need be, whether they are likely to give you an entry level job. Do this research before you spend alot of time and money doing a degree.

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As for whether it's worth doing a degree, I think it will probably help you get your foot in the door somewhere - getting the initial experience will be the difficult part.

Agreed. My MA is from a middle ranking university (not Russell Group, but not a post-92 either) in archival science. The cohort I did it with was split more or less 50/50 between people who were doing it as an exit qualification and those (of which I was one) who were regarding it as a stepping stone to a PhD. A lot of the taught content was unimaginative and not very useful. Some of the document and artefact handling and conservation techniques we were taught were obsolete and no longer in use in any archives or libraries in the developed world. I sat in a seminar room almost open mouthed as I heard a lecture on copyright, by a tutor who was quite simply unaware that the 1957 act was no longer in force and had been superseded by the 1988 one. When I asked her if she was aware of this in the discussion afterwards, she looked at me like a rabbit in headlights! She had also never heard of the European Union Copyright Directive, which was in the final drafting stages when I did that course. However, the research skills learnt under supervision on the dissertation plus the contacts made on the compulsory work placement were extremely relevant to employability, and most of the other students who got a job in the field shortly after finishing did so because of the contacts made.

The one drawback of the OU I have heard from various people who have studied with it is the absence of easy access to a decent academic library. The OU is a member of the SCONUL scheme, which enables students enrolled at a member institution to use the libraries of all the other member institutions free of charge, and so if you live in a university town or city, that's an option. But the library there might not have the stuff you need, especially if that institution doesn't teach a similar degree to the one you're studying. That is a very useful perk, though: if you're not a staff member or registered student at a higher education institution, access to their library can be very expensive. The university I work at sells annual memberships of its library to the public for £150, and that's one of the cheaper ones.

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There could be trouble ahead for MS with .NET

http://www.i-program...ming-storm.html

Hmm looks like myth mixed with some reality. Ie9 is out soon (beta came out last week), the whole focus is Html5, compliance and performance, Its 3d accelerated and apparently faster than chrome. Seems like an odd thing to miss out in an article as it is pivotal to microsofts development. MS are now contributing to JQuery which is now central AJAX development, also they are moving over to Asp.NET MVC from forms which helps dev produe more standards compliant websites/applications

WPF/Silverlight is a step forwards, new WP7 only uses silverlight. Silverlight has alot of advantages over html5 for applications, especially as it adopts a MVC model which makes it much easier to test and develop better code, its much faster to market and has made a massive in-road in internal banking/financial services systems worldwide...

http://ie.microsoft.com/testdrive/

Microsoft tend to do lots of things at the same time, they allow you to develop the same thing in in any different ways, whilst still supporting the old stuff...

As for doing OU, perhaps but if you can self learn and get an upto date industry certification you will be heads and shoulders above most devs in knowledge and with enough practice you will get the right job.

The Guy in charge or Microsoft Development is a Guy call Scoot Guthrie, clever geeky bloke with alot of Support from within microsoft, external developers and competitors. His aim appears to make Microsoft more standards compliment and better and cleaner, and contribute and be more involved with open source, saying MS is in danger with Scott in control is a little daft, he is more switched on than his competitors heads of developement...

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I think as others have said a degree might be great fun and more importantly get you a foot in the door when it comes time to getting a job, but it would be next to useless in giving you the practical skills needed to build a website.

Any Tom, Dick or Harry can knock up a site, but to build a decent commercial website with thousands of visitors takes real skill and experience. You mention that your web hosting, go Daddy, doesn't provide support for Wordpress, well to be honest anything that doesn't allow you access to do that isn't something you want to be building any commercial site on, it's fine for a small personal site or web site for a club or small organisation but not much else. There are two scenarios, it really doesn't allow you to do it or you don't have the skills to add it yourself. In the first instance I refer you back to my point of it being crap web hosting, if it is the later then you have a lot to learn.

I know it's possibly crap advice but they only real way to get the experience is get a job doing it, much easier said than done. It really is like me saying I can drive a car and want to build one with no experience of mechanics or car building at all.

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I think as others have said a degree might be great fun and more importantly get you a foot in the door when it comes time to getting a job, but it would be next to useless in giving you the practical skills needed to build a website.

Any Tom, Dick or Harry can knock up a site, but to build a decent commercial website with thousands of visitors takes real skill and experience. You mention that your web hosting, go Daddy, doesn't provide support for Wordpress, well to be honest anything that doesn't allow you access to do that isn't something you want to be building any commercial site on, it's fine for a small personal site or web site for a club or small organisation but not much else. There are two scenarios, it really doesn't allow you to do it or you don't have the skills to add it yourself. In the first instance I refer you back to my point of it being crap web hosting, if it is the later then you have a lot to learn.

I know it's possibly crap advice but they only real way to get the experience is get a job doing it, much easier said than done. It really is like me saying I can drive a car and want to build one with no experience of mechanics or car building at all.

Thanks for your advice gilf. They offer 'Wordpress' but I would have to register a new domain to get it, as it's not compatible for what I currently have. I have to use 'front page' now which might be a real ball ache. I'm thinking of registering a new domain. Next time I will have a much better idea because of the mistakes I'm making now.

I'd like to thank all contributors to this thread and my other thread on starting an internet business so far as it's been a real eye opener for me and other housepricecrash members. I still think my idea still has business potential but there are a lot of technical avenues I need to explore. Might have to outsource it if it's worth putting the money down. Keep it coming guys.

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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