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Dave Beans

Prisoners & Debt

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Although I know that they might have more pressing matters, but what usually happens to a prisoners debt when they get sent away? Is it frozen? can it be easy to make them bankrupt?

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lol, good question. I guess it depends on the length of the sentence.

I'd be interested to know what happens to all your stuff too. Perhaps there's a gap in the market for this sort of service, someone that will deal your assets if you get sent down for a long stretch.

Edited by Chef

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You can claim housing benefit for 13 weeks while your in prison, so if your on a short sentence, you have a home to return to. However, when leaving prison, you get housing priority anyhow. If your serving longer than 6 years, then it might be worth going bankrupt!

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You can claim housing benefit for 13 weeks while your in prison, so if your on a short sentence, you have a home to return to. However, when leaving prison, you get housing priority anyhow. If your serving longer than 6 years, then it might be worth going bankrupt!

Yep it is one of the criteria for being found "homeless" which is the best route into social housing.

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Yep it is one of the criteria for being found "homeless" which is the best route into social housing.

Ah well, if the banks loose my money and the pension system collapses it's nice to know I have a fall back plan! B)

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You can claim housing benefit for 13 weeks while your in prison, so if your on a short sentence, you have a home to return to. However, when leaving prison, you get housing priority anyhow. If your serving longer than 6 years, then it might be worth going bankrupt!

Would the bankruptcy be served whilst your inside, or would it only start when you come out?

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Ah well, if the banks loose my money and the pension system collapses it's nice to know I have a fall back plan! B)

You could try a stint in the armed forces or spend sometime in a mental institution instead. Both of those will get you classified as homeless.

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You could try a stint in the armed forces or spend sometime in a mental institution instead. Both of those will get you classified as homeless.

,

Too old for the armed forces, and besides I'm allergic to dying, mental institution has possibilities though... :D

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As a former Young Offender I can give a little insight. Whilst on remand as a teenager, my celly was an older married man. His Mrs was left paying what she could to the creditors whilst feeding the kids. (it was all joint debt)

The poor guy spent his days (and nights) pacing around the cell worrying about his family. After a few months on remand he left for a court appearance. I found out from the screw later in the day that the case had (quite rightly) collapsed.

I also remember a fact sheet in a "Welcome pack" I received once containing a leaflet about dealing with debt whilst in prison and about how debts can grow. I checked the PRT website. This is the best I could come up with...

http://www.adviceguide.org.uk/index/p_prisoners_and_debt.pdf

It seems you have to do an MSE....

1) enter dialogue with your creditors explaining your situation

2) cut up and stop using cards (obvious if your in the jail tho someone outside might still be using them or you might have recurring charges on them like subscriptions)

3) make sure your benefits are up to date and claim any monies owed

4) look for full and final settlements/ token payments/ frozen interest

5) bankruptcy is last option

(ps i spent most of my teenage years in Secure units or Young Offenders or Local Prison for remand. If you need any advice just message me)

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As a former Young Offender I can give a little insight. Whilst on remand as a teenager, my celly was an older married man. His Mrs was left paying what she could to the creditors whilst feeding the kids. (it was all joint debt)

The poor guy spent his days (and nights) pacing around the cell worrying about his family. After a few months on remand he left for a court appearance. I found out from the screw later in the day that the case had (quite rightly) collapsed.

I also remember a fact sheet in a "Welcome pack" I received once containing a leaflet about dealing with debt whilst in prison and about how debts can grow. I checked the PRT website. This is the best I could come up with...

http://www.adviceguide.org.uk/index/p_prisoners_and_debt.pdf

It seems you have to do an MSE....

1) enter dialogue with your creditors explaining your situation

2) cut up and stop using cards (obvious if your in the jail tho someone outside might still be using them or you might have recurring charges on them like subscriptions)

3) make sure your benefits are up to date and claim any monies owed

4) look for full and final settlements/ token payments/ frozen interest

5) bankruptcy is last option

(ps i spent most of my teenage years in Secure units or Young Offenders or Local Prison for remand. If you need any advice just message me)

I've also found this...

http://www.mind.org.uk/help/social_factors/managing_your_money/managing_money_in_prison

You ideally need to speak to a debt advisor, but if there isn't one available? Must make it harder. I suspect a lot of prisoners have numeracy & literacy issues, so they may make it hard to understand fully what's going on..

As a sort of aside, it is shocking how poorly some prisoners are treated after release - I spoke to a volunteer I work with, is an ex-offender.. Many do end up homeless, which during the summer is just about manageable, during the winter, many commit crime just to stay warm, and prison just becomes a revolving door..

Edited by Dave Beans

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I've also found this...

http://www.mind.org.uk/help/social_factors/managing_your_money/managing_money_in_prison

You ideally need to speak to a debt advisor, but if there isn't one available? Must make it harder. I suspect a lot of prisoners have numeracy & literacy issues, so they may make it hard to understand fully what's going on..

As a sort of aside, it is shocking how poorly some prisoners are treated after release - I spoke to a volunteer I work with, is an ex-offender.. Many do end up homeless, which during the summer is just about manageable, during the winter, many commit crime just to stay warm, and prison just becomes a revolving door..

I now work with an organisation that provides a direct alternative to youth custody. Homelessness, (in all it's forms, not just people who are living on the streets) is a major issue and can result in imprisonment. Alternatives to custody are rarely available to those without stable accomodation. Institutionalisation is a VERY controversial issue and was alluded to in the last series of Bad Girls on ITV attracting criticism from some quarters.

I imigine that debt advice (of some form) may be available in larger prisons. These institutions often make good use of external agencies. However, I do remember having to read many a letter or information of other sorts to my illiterate cellies over the years. I was actually a clever little B**tard. I was just screwed up by years in a children's home.

Edited by the-wife's-knickers

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I now work with an organisation that provides a direct alternative to youth custody. Homelessness, (in all it's forms, not just people who are living on the streets) is a major issue and can result in imprisonment. Alternatives to custody are rarely available to those without stable accomodation. Institutionalisation is a VERY controversial issue and was alluded to in the last series of Bad Girls on ITV attracting criticism from some quarters.

I imigine that debt advice (of some form) may be available in larger prisons. These institutions often make good use of external agencies. However, I do remember having to read many a letter or information of other sorts to my illiterate cellies over the years. I was actually a clever little B**tard. I was just screwed up by years in  a children's home.

I've seen myself how homelessness can result in crime and then prison. I've also seen crime result in homelessness and then prison. To distinguish between the two is quite difficult, but hopefully will be easier in the future. Currently I see prison as a form of social housing (due to the lack of it). At times I have considered getting locked up, to have a roof over my head, and I know people who have done so.

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I've seen myself how homelessness can result in crime and then prison. I've also seen crime result in homelessness and then prison. To distinguish between the two is quite difficult, but hopefully will be easier in the future. Currently I see prison as a form of social housing (due to the lack of it). At times I have considered getting locked up, to have a roof over my head, and I know people who have done so.

I did my best to avoid prison/custody as I found it truly horrible and degrading. It did not stop me from committing further crimes though. have you explored all local authority and charity provision?? Some people cope well with custody. Others do not.

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I did my best to avoid prison/custody as I found it truly horrible and degrading. It did not stop me from committing further crimes though. have you explored all local authority and charity provision?? Some people cope well with custody. Others do not.

In my part of the world, there's a charity called Footprints.. They cover Somerset & Dorset. http://www.footprintsproject.org.uk/...They try to help get ex-offenders on their feet...

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  • 142 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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