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Leaving Do's At Work - Attendance

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I've noticed that when guys leave work, around 20 or so guys show up plus around 5 chicks. When chicks leave, around 20 guys turn up and 40 other chicks. Why are chicks so rude when guys leave the office?

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I've noticed that when guys leave work, around 20 or so guys show up plus around 5 chicks. When chicks leave, around 20 guys turn up and 40 other chicks. Why are chicks so rude when guys leave the office?

Because men will go out for a beer regardless of what is going on.

Women on the other hand form factions in work places, the bigger the work place the bigger the divides and factions. Being a woman in itself is a faction.

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Women on the other hand form factions in work places, the bigger the work place the bigger the divides and factions. Being a woman in itself is a faction.

Am I totally missing something because I've not noticed these factions in the place I've worked for 7 years?

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I've noticed that when guys leave work, around 20 or so guys show up plus around 5 chicks. When chicks leave, around 20 guys turn up and 40 other chicks. Why are chicks so rude when guys leave the office?

It does happen, though I don't think it's rude.

Thinking about where I've worked women in offices tend more to the extremes of very popular and very insular. Men are usually away from those extremes. So switch it around (using your numbers) and for a man leaving the very popular 5 women tend to show up (part of why they're popular) plus 20 sociable blokes and this is fairly typical.

For the small number of popular women leaving everybody will make an effort, as you say, but I have noticed that far more women than men either have no leaving do or just have a quiet lunch the two or three people they sit with.

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People leaving offices usually means that they have made a decision that they would prefer to work elsewhere in a more preferable company and with more preferable people. So, why oh why are people expected to attend a social event to celebrate the fact that they'd rather be somewhere else? How self-indugent for someone to expect people to give up their time to mark the fact that someone is moving job. Who cares?

What's worse, and when I used to work in an office, I used to point blank refuse to do, was contribute towards a gift fund for the departure. So, they don't want to be there and I'm expected to give a fiver to buy them a present to commemorate this?

It was the ridiculous little things like this that made my decision to never work in an office again a simple one.

Working with you must be a "laugh riot", hope you now do something more in keeping with your personality, perhaps "solo round the world yachting!!".

On a serious note, women have children to look after.

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People leaving offices usually means that they have made a decision that they would prefer to work elsewhere in a more preferable company and with more preferable people. So, why oh why are people expected to attend a social event to celebrate the fact that they'd rather be somewhere else? How self-indugent for someone to expect people to give up their time to mark the fact that someone is moving job. Who cares?

If he was getting the first round in, I would turn up to Hitler's leaving do.

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I tend to avoid them. For some people work is part of their life while for others it's something that keeps them from their life. I'm in the latter group.

Yeah, me too.

Doesn't matter how nice the people at work are, the fact I spend more time with them than my family and friends means I just cannot face socialising with them.

Much like work Christmas do's, men tend to go because they know they will get to be in the presence of the office hottie whilst both his wife and her fella will not be present, the only time he will get to drunkenly make a pass at her.

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It does happen, though I don't think it's rude.

Thinking about where I've worked women in offices tend more to the extremes of very popular and very insular. Men are usually away from those extremes. So switch it around (using your numbers) and for a man leaving the very popular 5 women tend to show up (part of why they're popular) plus 20 sociable blokes and this is fairly typical.

For the small number of popular women leaving everybody will make an effort, as you say, but I have noticed that far more women than men either have no leaving do or just have a quiet lunch the two or three people they sit with.

So it seems chicks think they are dispensable?

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So it seems chicks think they are dispensable?

No, wasn't saying that. But when I think of who the quietest, moodiest or most miserable employees in any office they are mostly women and they're the ones who don't have leaving dos.

Equally the most fun most liked employees tend to be mostly women so they have big leaving dos.

Men tend to be more generally affable but not make the effort to go round smiling at everybody and asking how they are.

I'm amazed by Pete / TBF on this thread. Boy you guys must have hated your jobs.

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Not really the job. It became intolerable at around the same time as personnel morphed into what we now call HR and I had to get three signatures just to brew up.

Incidently, it became commonplace that to keep HR busy, levaing dos were one of the things they organised.

Why should anyone give money to someone who wants to leave their job? I don't get it. And I consider myself to be quite fun.

You've worked with them for a few years, you've had a few laughs, done each other some favours. You want to mark their departure and give them something they'll enjoy and will make them smile when they unwrap it.

Your old employer just sounds like a crap company to me. HR organising leaving dos? I've never heard of that before. Every company I've worked for a friend organises the present and its presentation and the departee organises the leaving do. Or not if they don't want one.

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I tend to avoid them. For some people work is part of their life while for others it's something that keeps them from their life. I'm in the latter group.

I only go to them in the case of someone I've actually worked with closely and/or have significant respect for. Even then, if I know or suspect that there is going to be substantial presence of people I can't stand, I will offer to take the leaver out for a quiet drink on a separate occasion to say goodbye. The internal politics in my workplace (a university department) can get pretty poisonous, and the people who spread the poison are also the people who take it upon themselves to organise the Christmas bash and the large-scale leaving bashes. Out of a total staff of around 50 in our department, there are maybe three or four people who I'd voluntarily spend time with outside working hours.

Last year I urinated off the busybody secretary who regards organising the Christmas party as constituting around 90% of her job role by organising a dissidents' gathering at the same time but in a different place. At that time a new head of department was busy dividing and victimising the whole place, and so I gave a verbal invitation to several of her victims (of whom I was among) suggesting a low-key, informal Christmas drink in a separate location, pointing out that the guest list was exclusive and regulated, and that unlike the official do, paying £25 in advance for a s****y, microwaved meal was not required. Attendance at the official bash was down by about two thirds on historical norms, and I think that sent a very powerful message to the management about the way they were going.

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I never give to 'group' leaving presents, or sign the card that comes around accompanied by the inevitable shaken envelope. Sorry, but 'why should I ?'

However, if someone leaves that during the course of their job has helped me, then I will buy them a leaving gift that is personally from me. I will probably have given them 'tokens' of appreciation during the course of their work as well.

I never go to group parties or work socials either, unless I will meet beneficial people. However, I will get a group of people together that I wish to spend time amongst. Why should I spend my time and my money pretending to be joyous with people I don't want to be around, I have better things to do.

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The leaving collection annoys me greatly as the majority of people leaving are usually going to a better job with more cash and yet you're being shaken down for cash - and then there's the dilemma of the witty message to put on the card. I've always been tempted to put the wrong name on the card but I just leave a "All the best in your new job" message.

The office where I work is friendly but has this "tradition" that people should bring in cakes on their birthday or cakes\sweets from when they come back on holidays, a routine which I do take part in, but only because I do help myself on other people's birthday.

ps when did people start spelling dilemna as dilemma or have I always spelled it incorrectly

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I've noticed that when guys leave work, around 20 or so guys show up plus around 5 chicks. When chicks leave, around 20 guys turn up and 40 other chicks. Why are chicks so rude when guys leave the office?

Women are more social/political with each other. If the woman who is leaving hasn't been getting on well with her the women wont show, or will only show to see who turns up. If the woman is relatively popular more women will show up, they are there to read between the lines. Where as blokes are simpler and turn up for a beer, less women turn up because it is too simple, and there are no lines to read between, it doesn't help there political position to be there. IMHO most of the women who do turn up for a mans leaving do are there for the guys/flirting, or serious career types for the networking and know they need to butter up the right people to move up the tree.

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I bet that you will never hear from them or meet them ever again..... so I'm with TBF on this

Ok I've stopped now but I used to meet up every year with my workmates from my last job in London when I went up there, can't remember how long for but over 5 years.

Still in touch with people from my previous job, and despite it being 200 miles away and left four years ago I am still in e-mail contact with a couple of them and have met up since for a couple of lunches and a few beers one evening, last time was about a year ago but will probably meet up again next March. I let them know when I'm up there and vice versa.

I thought this was standard, sounds like it might just be me then :huh:

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I bet that you will never hear from them or meet them ever again..... so I'm with TBF on this

Maybe you don't but I keep in touch with a select few and they keep in touch with me as well...

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  • 261 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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