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The 'special Needs' Myth: Up To 750,000 Pupils Are Just Badly Taught

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1311777/Up-750-000-special-needs-pupils-just-badly-taught.html

'Schools have wrongly labelled as many as 750,000 children as having special needs to cover up poor teaching, a damning report warns today.

They are diagnosing conditions such as 'behavioural , emotional and social problems' to massage unfavourable league table ratings, according to inspectors.

They found that 1.7million pupils in England were classed as having special educational needs in January, just over one in five.

But, declares Ofsted, almost half of these have simply been poorly taught.

In some schools, a 'culture of excuses' means that pupils making slow progress are automatically classed as having special needs.

Inspectors found that some local authorities appear to offer incentives to give such labels to children as some types of educational need bring in extra funds'

Can't believe the outrage,this process of systemic malinvestment is how things we've kept our economy growing for 15/20/40 years.

I think the govt need to set up some committees staffed by the sacked people from the CDC to look into this.

In my day special needs mean't serious problems, like downs syndrome. Being stupid just got you put in a lower stream, suitable for your actual needs. My entire class was in the 'bright but disruptive' category, and we were handled as such. Teachers would get a difficult, but entertaining time. We were probably the only class where it was still cool to throw the blackboard wiper at, and have your knuckles rapped with a wooden ruler.

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Obviously anecdotal, but as the parent of a child with a Statement of SEN, it is very hard to get your child classified as SEN. The system is set up, at least here, to make it hard to get such a classification,

Peter.

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It wasn't until age 36 that I was diagnosed with Aspergers and ADHD.

I'm glad I wasn't diagnosed as a child, I fear I may have been treated differently and perhaps played up to the fact I was "special", blaming my poor behaviour on my condition rather than just needing discipline.

Sometimes kids don't need to be accommodated, they need to be put straight.

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It wasn't until age 36 that I was diagnosed with Aspergers and ADHD.

I'm glad I wasn't diagnosed as a child, I fear I may have been treated differently and perhaps played up to the fact I was "special", blaming my poor behaviour on my condition rather than just needing discipline.

Sometimes kids don't need to be accommodated, they need to be put straight.

"Aspergers" seems to cover quite a wide range of behaviours, and depending upon what they are depends upon whether a child needs help or a diagnosis.

As I understand things, in general, Asperger's kids tend to be honest (too much sometimes), so it might not have been a problem. Anyone, those with fairly strong Asperger's behaviours can't really control them or use them; their behavious control them,

Peter.

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I wouldn't underestimate the role of parents in this.

Too many abogate responsibility to the schools for things that are a parent's responsibility.

Things like basic behavioural standards and respect for adults.

My gf teaches year 1 and at the start of this term is still dealing with kids that take tantrums like 3 year olds.

There is also pressure from parents to want to label or diagnose their child when in reality, they just need better parenting.

On the flip side, it can be quite difficult to get a kid registered as special needs, it is not an instant process.

But there is a benefit to schools labeling kids as special needs, they get more resources and effectively get to increase their teacher to pupil ratio.

As in any environment, people perform to how they are measured, and I think that the league tables encourage this behaviour.

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Apologies in advance for the cynicism, but are there financial incentives in having a child declared as requiring special needs education?

Corruption has swept the UK over the last 15 years like never before, so this wouldn't surprise me. <_<

If so, just think how many children's futures have been tarnished by the corruption of adults in charge of them. :angry:

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I wouldn't underestimate the role of parents in this.

Too many abogate responsibility to the schools for things that are a parent's responsibility.

Things like basic behavioural standards and respect for adults.

My gf teaches year 1 and at the start of this term is still dealing with kids that take tantrums like 3 year olds.

There is also pressure from parents to want to label or diagnose their child when in reality, they just need better parenting.

On the flip side, it can be quite difficult to get a kid registered as special needs, it is not an instant process.

But there is a benefit to schools labeling kids as special needs, they get more resources and effectively get to increase their teacher to pupil ratio.

As in any environment, people perform to how they are measured, and I think that the league tables encourage this behaviour.

Agree with this. Teachers look after the children for maybe six hours a day at a ratio of 30-1, and they do this from age 5 during term time only. If you ask me, that leaves quite a lot of time for parents to teach their kids the things they think they should know. No doubt there is a bit of a tendency to label kids to help window dress the figures, but if a system is created where this is incentivised then its hardly surprising that this would go on.

I attribute the special needs requirement more to parents being too selfish to spend time and educate their own children.

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I wouldn't underestimate the role of parents in this.

Too many abogate responsibility to the schools for things that are a parent's responsibility.

Things like basic behavioural standards and respect for adults.

My gf teaches year 1 and at the start of this term is still dealing with kids that take tantrums like 3 year olds.

There is also pressure from parents to want to label or diagnose their child when in reality, they just need better parenting.

Could not agree more, when I was a kid my mum (worked full time in family business) with 4 kids still found time to read with us and gave us educational (but from memory) things to do with our spare time we were not just parked in front of the TV. We were taught to respect others and listen to our teachers and I am pretty sure could read before we went to school.

There are stories now of kids turning up at school who have not even been properly toilet trained or able to eat with a knife and fork. my friend was a teacher and had to live with threats to her and her property from both the kids (6/7 yr olds) or their irate parents who would come along if their little darling had been told off, it was always the teachers fault apparently not that their brat was a little wee shite.

There seems to be many people in this country who are simply not capable or responsible enough to give their own children some kind of start in life. To blame poor teaching is not especially fair.

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But there is a benefit to schools labeling kids as special needs, they get more resources and effectively get to increase their teacher to pupil ratio.

The schools actually get to increase their teaching assistant to pupil ratio, though in theory the TA will be assigned to the particular pupil (for the hours agreed).

However whatever the benefit to the school, there is a cost to the LEA, and it's them what decides whether the school get the money, not the school itself (and the LEA generally is not keen to hand out the readies),

Peter.

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There are stories now of kids turning up at school who have not even been properly toilet trained or able to eat with a knife and fork.

This is actually quite commonplace, there is a significant minority of parents that are utterly clueless and or utterly lazy when it comes to bringing up their own kids.

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The schools actually get to increase their teaching assistant to pupil ratio, though in theory the TA will be assigned to the particular pupil (for the hours agreed).

However whatever the benefit to the school, there is a cost to the LEA, and it's them what decides whether the school get the money, not the school itself (and the LEA generally is not keen to hand out the readies),

Peter.

True, and the current situation has the effect of diluting the extra resource available to a situtation where the kids that really could do with help probably get less help than they merit.

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One of my 3 kids(middle one) has brain damage the local primary school were adamant they could cope with him despite wearing nappies still and being unable to walk(6 yrs ago.

A friend who worked at the school pointed out they would get funds to build whatever they said they needed to cope with him and an extra member of staff to assist. Equally the local education officer was pushing to place him there to boost their inclusion figures to the point where my wife was reduced to tears.

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Apologies in advance for the cynicism, but are there financial incentives in having a child declared as requiring special needs education?

Corruption has swept the UK over the last 15 years like never before, so this wouldn't surprise me. <_<

If so, just think how many children's futures have been tarnished by the corruption of adults in charge of them. :angry:

Something on Radio 2 now, Jeremy Vine?

A woman rang in - her sister got the kid classified in order to get the £60 per week. She didn't give give her name, said she was ashamed of her. :(

Another caller was a health visitor, said they were all at it on her patch.

It's just another benefits scam by the huge proportion of scumbags in our society.

Shame that they get away with it, and there will be no money left to help kids who really do have serious problems.

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The schools actually get to increase their teaching assistant to pupil ratio, though in theory the TA will be assigned to the particular pupil (for the hours agreed).

What is this "teaching assistant" thing? When I was a kid there were no teaching assistants. You had one teacher and 30 pupils and it all seemed to work. Given how poor the outcomes seem to be in some schools, wtf is going on?!

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When I was of primary school age in the early 1960's, we had a boy in our class who couldn't spell. I mean he really couldn't spell anything properly. The teacher used to get very angry with him and call him stupid. Sometimes one of the teachers, a man, would give him a hefty clip round the ear for his stupid spelling. Clearly this boy was dyslexic, but dyslexia didn't exist in those days.

Bursting into tears was the worst possible thing a boy could do in those days. Yet this boy would be sobbing and the teacher still balling at him 'get it right, get it right, stupid'.

One thing I never understood is how some teachers kept control without even raising their voice, even if nobody liked them, while others could shout and scream and nobody took any notice - there must be some sort of leadership pheromone that some men produce, I reckon.

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When I was of primary school age in the early 1960's, we had a boy in our class who couldn't spell. I mean he really couldn't spell anything properly. The teacher used to get very angry with him and call him stupid. Sometimes one of the teachers, a man, would give him a hefty clip round the ear for his stupid spelling. Clearly this boy was dyslexic, but dyslexia didn't exist in those days.

Bursting into tears was the worst possible thing a boy could do in those days. Yet this boy would be sobbing and the teacher still balling at him 'get it right, get it right, stupid'.

There's an interesting question as to whether things such as autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are becoming more prevalent, for some reason(s), or, as in your example imply being recognized more often.

One thing I never understood is how some teachers kept control without even raising their voice, even if nobody liked them, while others could shout and scream and nobody took any notice - there must be some sort of leadership pheromone that some men produce, I reckon.

There certainly is something,

Peter.

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About 12 months ago I considered applying for a part-time teacher's assistant at the local school. It was to help with Mathematics and English with which I wouldn't have a problem with as I've studied Mathematics to degree level and I've got an engineering background. When I phoned up the school about the job she said in not-so-many-words that I'd be dealing with the bad lads of the school and that I needed only to be qualified to GCSE C grade in mathematics but most of all, and I distinctly remember the phrase she used, 'you've got to care about them as they have their difficulties'.<br><br>Now I'm not teaching expert but to just get someone with the bare minimum quals for the job seems to me to be writing those bad lads off. It just seems as though they're wanting someone to baby sit them for the time they are in school and don't expect them to achieve anything. Whether it's the kids' fault, their circumstances or crap teachers the fact is they are the way they are and I would have thought that the school would have wanted someone to show some light on what they could become rather than baby-sitting them until they go out into the world and most likely into the gutter.<br>

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There's an interesting question as to whether things such as autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are becoming more prevalent, for some reason(s), or, as in your example imply being recognized more often.

There certainly is something,

Peter.

Am currently working in this area. What Peter has asked is the kernel of the issue. More kids are presenting with syndromes and conditions. I definitely think you can tell the difference between a "bold" kid and a kid with ADHD, for example. Schools have also become better at identifying syndromes and condiitions. So I think there is a big increase in genuine special needs kids attending mainstream schools. It gets more diificult to ask why this is so. One reason is because most kids now attend school, thanks to the efforts of local authorities, truancy officers etc. A few decades ago the strange lad at the back of the class would inevitably drift off to the army or local factory without attempting any final exams. Also now special needs kids are legally entitled to attend local schools in as much as any other kid from the area. In previous times such kids were encouraged to go to specialist schools. Another contentious area that is often too PC to broach is special needs kids backgrounds. Myself and many others find that many kids with diagnosed behaviours come from single parent backgrounds with associated socio-economic problems such as diet etc. Lately there appears to have been a huge spike in girls presenting with Autism and Asperger type conditions when typically it was something associated with boys. So one could argue that certain conditions are a product of economic and lifestyle factors. If so,prepare for a continued increase in such children attending mainstream schhols as society continues it's merry spiral downwards....

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Am currently working in this area. What Peter has asked is the kernel of the issue. More kids are presenting with syndromes and conditions. I definitely think you can tell the difference between a "bold" kid and a kid with ADHD, for example. Schools have also become better at identifying syndromes and condiitions. So I think there is a big increase in genuine special needs kids attending mainstream schools. It gets more diificult to ask why this is so. One reason is because most kids now attend school, thanks to the efforts of local authorities, truancy officers etc. A few decades ago the strange lad at the back of the class would inevitably drift off to the army or local factory without attempting any final exams. Also now special needs kids are legally entitled to attend local schools in as much as any other kid from the area. In previous times such kids were encouraged to go to specialist schools. Another contentious area that is often too PC to broach is special needs kids backgrounds. Myself and many others find that many kids with diagnosed behaviours come from single parent backgrounds with associated socio-economic problems such as diet etc. Lately there appears to have been a huge spike in girls presenting with Autism and Asperger type conditions when typically it was something associated with boys. So one could argue that certain conditions are a product of economic and lifestyle factors. If so,prepare for a continued increase in such children attending mainstream schhols as society continues it's merry spiral downwards....

And of course once you have put them in the syndrome box, marked them out for special treatment (i.e. dislocated them from mainstream school society) and defined/facilitated their "difference" you can fully expect them to act out the behaviours required of their new role.

It dosnt surprise me that more of these children come from fecked up families, we are seeing the result of "TV only" parenting with no family lead on personal growth or intelectual stimulation. Its no wonder these kids have problems.

The trouble is once you say "that kid has disorder x" parents tend to think that its the cause rather than the consequence of their terrible parenting.

Very sad.

(not saying that this is the reason for all these kinds of problems, their are kids out their I'm sure with congenital conditions)

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I definitely think you can tell the difference between a "bold" kid and a kid with ADHD, for example.

Was just about to ask about this. How would you tell the difference ? Is there a difference ? Why are those who have the opposite of ADHD not fed drugs and 'helped' along with their issues.

Not getting at you personally - just the need in general to attach some sort of 'Disorder' to every child that is a little different. Well only the ones that cause a disturbance/hassle mind you.

Opposite of ADHD ? I think the schools are full of them. However they sit there quiet, do their work and do not cause the teachers hassle. They are known as 'studios' or introverted or they 'keeop themselves to themselves'.

Why arent this lot put on a drug cocktail of E's and Coke to perk them up a little.

I think most of it, but not all, is just a scam. And yes I do know someone with so called ADHD. I went to he same school a number of years earlier and I am pretty sure if I was there today I would be classed as 'ADHD' in a jiffy.

Funny I just grew out of my so called 'symptoms'. I imagine most do. And even if they do not ? Is it really a big deal ? Surely everyone being a bit different is expected...

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Apologies in advance for the cynicism, but are there financial incentives in having a child declared as requiring special needs education?

At university when i was there, it was very common for people to take (and fake) dyslexia tests in order to be given the right to buy ANY computer desktop or laptop of their choosing (almost unlimited budget, maybe 5000 pounds PER student).

So I had people telling me how they took the test and faked it on purpose to get free top of the range desktop computers, some even did custom builds.

All government funded ofcourse, gotta love this country.

I feel like a sucker for not joining them ;) At the time I thought we lived in a moral society so I was trying to be a responsible citizen but now I see how corrupt everything is I wish i had joined them.

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Guest Absolutely Fabulous

I wouldn't underestimate the role of parents in this.

Too many abogate responsibility to the schools for things that are a parent's responsibility.

Things like basic behavioural standards and respect for adults.

My gf teaches year 1 and at the start of this term is still dealing with kids that take tantrums like 3 year olds.

There is also pressure from parents to want to label or diagnose their child when in reality, they just need better parenting.

On the flip side, it can be quite difficult to get a kid registered as special needs, it is not an instant process.

But there is a benefit to schools labeling kids as special needs, they get more resources and effectively get to increase their teacher to pupil ratio.

As in any environment, people perform to how they are measured, and I think that the league tables encourage this behaviour.

Agree with this. I came from a working class area with parents that did blue collar work, yet they found time to spend time with me, read to me, take me out walks in the country.

At the risk of sounding snobby - but glad to be classified thus on these criteria - My parents spent VERY few nights out drinking in the pub, or partying, or generally leaving us kids to fend for ourselves. Mum was in amateur dramatics and took us with her when rehearsals were early enough, hence adding to our musical education: we also had an old piano at home which Dad played.

I look around now and many of my age group are baby-sitting so that their kids can leave their kids whilst they go 'dahn the pub' to pickle their livers.

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There are stories now of kids turning up at school who have not even been properly toilet trained or able to eat with a knife and fork. ...

There seems to be many people in this country who are simply not capable or responsible enough to give their own children some kind of start in life. ..

and ...

HousePriceCras Thread : Girl 7 waits at bus stop by herself to go to school

... I am the weaver ... ;)

There is a difference between teaching kids to stand on their own two feet and just letting them ....

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Was just about to ask about this. How would you tell the difference ? Is there a difference ? Why are those who have the opposite of ADHD not fed drugs and 'helped' along with their issues.

Not getting at you personally - just the need in general to attach some sort of 'Disorder' to every child that is a little different. Well only the ones that cause a disturbance/hassle mind you.

Opposite of ADHD ? I think the schools are full of them. However they sit there quiet, do their work and do not cause the teachers hassle. They are known as 'studios' or introverted or they 'keeop themselves to themselves'.

Why arent this lot put on a drug cocktail of E's and Coke to perk them up a little.

I think most of it, but not all, is just a scam. And yes I do know someone with so called ADHD. I went to he same school a number of years earlier and I am pretty sure if I was there today I would be classed as 'ADHD' in a jiffy.

Funny I just grew out of my so called 'symptoms'. I imagine most do. And even if they do not ? Is it really a big deal ? Surely everyone being a bit different is expected...

Take your point ccc regarding diagnosis of ADD etc. The problem here as in medicine is "that doctors differ"..i.e. there are a number of ways in which a diagnosis can be reached. One method involves interviewing parents, teachers etc. and drawing a conclusion from their observations. This of course can be inherently and culturally biased and is far from satisfactory. The optimum way of forming a diagnosis is to have a multi disciplinary team (educational psychologist, psychiatrist, speech and language therapist) observe and analyse the subject in a number of settings. Not surprisingly this is expensive and hard to implement. Hence, you may encounter individuals who describe themselves as ADD etc, even though it may only be on foot of a very dubious attempt at diagnosis.

I have worked with kids who have been professionally diagnosed with ADD (there are a number of variants: in fact about 4-6 according to who you read, depending on the presence or not of Hyperactivity - hence AD(H)D- passivity, aggression etc.) I do honestly believe now after some initial hesitation that they have a genuine problem. They exhibit traits of extreme forgetfulness, lack of organisation and poor understanding of language in school and personal settings. But here too there is a spectrum; someone might have a mild or extremely severe case of the condition.

Some of the worst cases are often medicated: but the typical drugs like ritalin etc. are often viewed with suspicion due to addiction isues.

in the book version of "The Exorcist",the psychiatrist initially recommends ritalin for the girl: proving ADHD is often used as a label by some for a condition or behaviour they can't control. Didn't do much good in that case.........

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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