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200,000 Public Jobs Already Axed

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1311266/Tens-thousands-public-sector-jobs-lost-massive-Government-spending-cuts.html

More than 200,000 public sector jobs have already been axed or are at risk of being lost after massive spending cuts even before the Government unveils its comprehensive spending review, new research revealed today.

Councils, health authorities, police forces, Government departments and other public sector bodies across the country have all taken an axe to jobs in recent months after having their budgets slashed.

A study by the GMB union showed that 150,000 jobs were lost or are in the pipeline to be cut in over 150 public sector organisations across the UK, ranging from local authorities and hospitals to police authorities and the fire service.

Research by the Press Association showed that another 90,000 workers could lose their jobs because of moves by public sector organisations to cut spending, which is also having a knock-on effect in private firms.

Companies supplying goods and services to the public sector, ranging from public relations to office plants, are now being hit by the Government's austerity drive.

Union leaders said the total of almost a quarter of a million jobs could easily be doubled as a result of next month's comprehensive spending review, which they fear will lead to an acceleration of redundancies, fuelling a big rise in unemployment.

According to the GMB study there have been over 7,000 job cuts announced in the East Midlands at seven organisations, 1,700 in the Eastern region (7 organisations), almost 4,000 in London (11), over 2,000 in the North East (13), almost 6,000 in the North West (14), 110 in Northern Ireland (1), over 19,000 in Scotland (22), 8,600 in the South East (18), 8,100 in the South West (13), 1,800 in Wales (4), 8,600 in the West Midlands (17) and almost 7,000 in Yorkshire and the Humber (13).

Paul Kenny, general secretary of the GMB, said: 'Current job losses already announced in the public sector of nearly 150,000 are just the tip of the iceberg heading for our services and our economy when the comprehensive spending review finally hits home next month. Unemployment and cuts in public services follow the appointment of a Tory-led government like night follows day.

'It was the excesses of the bankers, not high public spending that caused the recession. The deficit in public finances is mainly due to the loss of 6% of national output because of the recession.

'The ideology of the Tory party is for a smaller state and they are hell bent on using the recession to impose these needless and ideologically driven cuts in public spending.'

The pace of job losses has accelerated in recent weeks following a series of announcements in the summer, including hundreds of job losses in Birmingham City Council, warnings of up to 3,000 job cuts at Nottinghamshire County Council and up to 600 job losses at the Royal Berkshire Hospital Trust.

In the past few weeks alone police forces in Kent and Hampshire have warned of up to 3,000 job cuts, the GMB estimated that Sheffield City Council will have to lose over 1,000 posts to make savings of almost £220 million and Somerset County Council warned of 1,500 job cuts.

The local authority losses follow an estimated 6,700 council job losses in England in the six months to May, with the rate expected to continue for the rest of the year.

Research by the Local Government Association showed that three in five councils made staff cuts in the run up to the general election in May and a similar number were planning more cuts over the next year.

The police Federation warned on Friday that up to 60,000 police jobs, including up to 40,000 frontline officers, could be at risk if Government funding cuts go ahead.

Dave Prentis, general secretary of Unison, said: "The Government's swingeing cuts across the public sector are causing widespread misery. They are obsessed with making cuts no matter what the cost to jobs and services.

'There are realistic alternatives including fairer taxation, clamping down on tax dodgers and the tax havens for the super-rich. We should be looking across to the US where they are injecting money into the economy to keep it moving, not risking a double-dip recession.'

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beat me to it TMT

More than 200,000 public sector jobs have already been axed or are at risk of being lost after massive spending cuts even before the Government unveils its comprehensive spending review, new research revealed today.

I know of 3...or was it 2?. that are already axed...well, the lady who told me SAID they had gone...could have been moved like her...

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My Bro in law is braced for cuts - starting next year. I think that the majority of places now have a recruitment freeze. Given the source of the article - a "newspaper" that wouldn't know the truth if it had "truth" tattooed on it I think the figure may well be an "estimate" :D

A lot of old Tory retired civil servants read the Mail. They really like to be annoyed about everything ;)

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I have not heard of one single person who has lost their job in the public sector. The only ones I have actually heard of going are the 400 in that BECTA Quango.

Have the other 199,600 had a lie in?

Hey MT, I have heard of redundancies coming through in the assembly - and loads of people who are under threat - e.g. CCW employees moved onto 3 day weeks, etc. Next year will be interesting.

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I have not heard of one single person who has lost their job in the public sector. The only ones I have actually heard of going are the 400 in that BECTA Quango.

Have the other 199,600 had a lie in?

It depends how you define "losing their job"

I work in about 4 public sector places at the moment, all of them have recruitment freezes, people leave / retire / contracts end all the time. These people are not being replaced.

At a rough estimate across the 2 councils, one medical research centre and one university I'm currently working with I reckon a good 100 staff have gone and not been replaced in the last 3 months.

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Hey MT, I have heard of redundancies coming through in the assembly - and loads of people who are under threat - e.g. CCW employees moved onto 3 day weeks, etc. Next year will be interesting.

Hadn't heard that stuff - but coming through and actually happening are two different things. At the moment it is still talk.

Have ALL CCW (Countryside Council for Wales) workers gone on to 3 day weeks do you know?

I have always wondered what the difference is between the CCW and the Forestry Commission for Wales? Plus we also have DEFRA in Wales.

Edit:

There was a female farmer on Radio Wales several months back talking about all the various tests that she has to regularly have for her cows.

Not only does it take up about a week every 3 months but she said all these different QUANGOs send people to do basically the same tests but no one seemed concerned about either the waste of her time and money nor the waste of public money.

Edited by The Masked Tulip

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These are probably jobs that haven't been created yet. IE, that were planned to be advertised this year but won't be after all.

The same as the cuts that are still spending growth (the announced cuts don't surpass the preceding announced spending increases).

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I have not heard of one single person who has lost their job in the public sector. The only ones I have actually heard of going are the 400 in that BECTA Quango.

Have the other 199,600 had a lie in?

Maybe but the other topic de jour about HMRC inability to reconcile the UK PAYE system may not be unconnected to the fact that the department has shed approx 23,000 staff or a nearly quarter of its workforce since 2005. The figures are in black and white in table 6 on page 96 of the HMRC Revenue accounts for 2009-2010

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/about/hmrc-accs-0910.pdf

There are another 130 offices scheduled to close between 2010-11

http://www.accountingweb.co.uk/topic/tax/hmrc-confirms-office-closures/398035

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/local/affected-offices.htm

The fact you do not know anyone personally impacted does not mean it is not happening

Edited by realcrookswearsuits

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It depends how you define "losing their job"

I work in about 4 public sector places at the moment, all of them have recruitment freezes, people leave / retire / contracts end all the time. These people are not being replaced.

Agreed , natural wastage is the first step to culling any workforce .......

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Maybe but the other topic de jour about HMRC inability to reconcile the UK PAYE system may not be unconnected to the fact that the department has shed approx 23,000 staff or a nearly quarter of its workforce since 2005. The figures are in black and white in table 6 on page 96 of the HMRC Revenue accounts for 2009-2010

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/about/hmrc-accs-0910.pdf

There are another 130 offices scheduled to close between 2010-11

http://www.accountingweb.co.uk/topic/tax/hmrc-confirms-office-closures/398035

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/local/affected-offices.htm

The fact you do not know anyone personally impacted does not mean it is not happening

I live in a city where two thirds of the workforce are public sector in a country where two thirds of the workforce are public sector - I think I would have noticed.

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i have to say, the one thing we miss over here is having a large, excessively funded expansive public sector running things, it causes immense difficulties with everything, we just dont seem to get that level of efficiency and speed of service we used to get in the uk

ohhhhh wait a minute......

Edited by Tamara De Lempicka

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i have to say, the one thing we miss over here is having a large, excessively funded expansive public sector running things, it causes immense difficulties with everything, we just dont seem to get that level of efficiency and speed of service we used to get in the uk

ohhhhh wait a minute......

My Mrs is a Secondary School Teacher in a local authority school in west of Scotland. Her school has had a steady roll of about 1400 children for the last few years. However, there are now 7 fewer teachers and the staff are pushed to the limit in terms of the school timetable. A number of ASN assistants have also left without replacement.

One of the teachers in her department is now giving up their lunchtime to teach exam age pupils in smaller groups as the timetable problems has prevented the pupils from getting enough time to complete their course (40 hours per SQA unit).

The PE department is at breaking point and has axed half of the after school clubs and groups that the teachers organised on a voluntary basis. The Music and Drama faculty has been told that it cannot have a school show as there is no money (even though it does eventually generate a profit once the tickets have sold). The teachers and pupils are devastated as they had already auditioned and started after-school rehersals in April.

No member of staff has been made redundant. They simply have had a recruitment freeze imposed.

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The PE department is at breaking point and has axed half of the after school clubs and groups that the teachers organised on a voluntary basis. The Music and Drama faculty has been told that it cannot have a school show as there is no money (even though it does eventually generate a profit once the tickets have sold). The teachers and pupils are devastated as they had already auditioned and started after-school rehersals in April.

Terrible. In this era of 'Glee' when every pupil and seemingly every teacher wishes to be singing and dancing in a school glee club this kind of financial cutback must be soul-destroying. How can they allow such a thing to happen?

Actually, it sounds just the sort of thing that you should make a glee club song and dance routine about which will so melt the cold stone hearts of the paper shufflers and bean counters that they would clapand jump up and down excitedly like little girls and reinstate the school show - at the expense of, oh, the physics department.

:rolleyes:

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These cuts are most likely unfilled posts which have been deleted. All departments at all levels of governments carry these empty positions on the books as they offer the opportunity for plenty of unplanned spending while staying within budget. The only repercussion will be the external "consultants" who used to count on a windfall near year end as department heads rushed to spend the remaining cash to prove that they needed it in the first place.

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Maybe but the other topic de jour about HMRC inability to reconcile the UK PAYE system may not be unconnected to the fact that the department has shed approx 23,000 staff or a nearly quarter of its workforce since 2005. The figures are in black and white in table 6 on page 96 of the HMRC Revenue accounts for 2009-2010

Yes, compounded by the massive increase in tax complexity introduced under Gordon Brown:

Under Labour, the tax code doubled to more than 11,000 pages, leaving businesses and individuals to cope with more than 400 reliefs.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1296110/Too-complex-tax-rules-torn-Small-businesses-benefit-streamlining.html#ixzz0zJkPV96s

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I know for a fact that in Devon CC, ALL temporary contracts are not being renewed - I know several people who have already been affected (losing their job or just having their hours cut) but I would guess a much larger wave will leave next March.

I also know that they are operating a recruitment freeze for non-essential jobs ie not replacing anyone who retires or leaves for another reason (and by my reckoning you could cut a good few % of the workforce using this alone).

You only have to look in your local paper to see how most of the non-jobs have dissapeared to see this is happening now.

MT - I would say whilst this would have some immediate effect in that demand for homes will lower, the effect of forced sales will take longer to feed through.

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Terrible. In this era of 'Glee' when every pupil and seemingly every teacher wishes to be singing and dancing in a school glee club this kind of financial cutback must be soul-destroying. How can they allow such a thing to happen?

Actually, it sounds just the sort of thing that you should make a glee club song and dance routine about which will so melt the cold stone hearts of the paper shufflers and bean counters that they would clapand jump up and down excitedly like little girls and reinstate the school show - at the expense of, oh, the physics department.

:rolleyes:

The Physics department is the department that is currently unable to provide 40 hours per unit hence the lunchtime classes. You may find this amusing. having read the school bulletins the school does appear to produce engineers/doctors/lawyers etc as they list their graduates.

The school, however, is more than 50years old and is literally falling down having been poorly maintained for years. School shows and sports clubs/teams etc are the sort of thing that keep the place going and keep spirits up.

Moreover the staff do actually provide a top quality service despite the poor conditions. I could not believe the state of the place when I went in for a visit. Water pouring down walls, classrooms re-arranged so the children were in the dry areas, windows boarded up, chalk boards that could not be used as the walls were rotten and the boards were likely to fall off.

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The Physics department is the department that is currently unable to provide 40 hours per unit hence the lunchtime classes. You may find this amusing. having read the school bulletins the school does appear to produce engineers/doctors/lawyers etc as they list their graduates.

The school, however, is more than 50years old and is literally falling down having been poorly maintained for years. School shows and sports clubs/teams etc are the sort of thing that keep the place going and keep spirits up.

Moreover the staff do actually provide a top quality service despite the poor conditions. I could not believe the state of the place when I went in for a visit. Water pouring down walls, classrooms re-arranged so the children were in the dry areas, windows boarded up, chalk boards that could not be used as the walls were rotten and the boards were likely to fall off.

I thought all schools had got themselves massively in debt re PFI and were all nice and new and modernised? Has Broon been telling porkies again?

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I love this, typical govt newsspeak

have already been axed or are at risk of being lost

Another one is road deaths and serious injuries

Theres a hell of a difference between the two, being employed or unemployed, being dead or alive.

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My Mrs is a Secondary School Teacher in a local authority school in west of Scotland. Her school has had a steady roll of about 1400 children for the last few years. However, there are now 7 fewer teachers and the staff are pushed to the limit in terms of the school timetable. A number of ASN assistants have also left without replacement.

One of the teachers in her department is now giving up their lunchtime to teach exam age pupils in smaller groups as the timetable problems has prevented the pupils from getting enough time to complete their course (40 hours per SQA unit).

The PE department is at breaking point and has axed half of the after school clubs and groups that the teachers organised on a voluntary basis. The Music and Drama faculty has been told that it cannot have a school show as there is no money (even though it does eventually generate a profit once the tickets have sold). The teachers and pupils are devastated as they had already auditioned and started after-school rehersals in April.

No member of staff has been made redundant. They simply have had a recruitment freeze imposed.

I thought education in Scotland was under the control of the assembly?

Also Cameron flew to see Salmond very shortly after the election and agreed with Salmond that cuts in Scotland would start next year not this year as they are in England.

So if it is that bad now in Scotland with no cuts yet then it seems you should brace yourself for the future.

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These are probably jobs that haven't been created yet. IE, that were planned to be advertised this year but won't be after all.

The same as the cuts that are still spending growth (the announced cuts don't surpass the preceding announced spending increases).

Yes, I was thinking of going to America on holiday would have probably cost me £2000. So if I now decide not to go ive made a cut, and saved money obviously. :P

The PE department is at breaking point and has axed half of the after school clubs and groups that the teachers organised on a voluntary basis.

If kids want to play football, tennis or whatever they dont need the school to organise this for them. Kids have been quite good at this since time began.

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The Physics department is the department that is currently unable to provide 40 hours per unit hence the lunchtime classes. You may find this amusing. having read the school bulletins the school does appear to produce engineers/doctors/lawyers etc as they list their graduates.

The school, however, is more than 50years old and is literally falling down having been poorly maintained for years. School shows and sports clubs/teams etc are the sort of thing that keep the place going and keep spirits up.

Moreover the staff do actually provide a top quality service despite the poor conditions. I could not believe the state of the place when I went in for a visit. Water pouring down walls, classrooms re-arranged so the children were in the dry areas, windows boarded up, chalk boards that could not be used as the walls were rotten and the boards were likely to fall off.

so doubling (sorry - investing in...) teachers' salaries didn't actually help the school buildings

who'd a thunk it eh...

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  • 152 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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