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With the govt desperate for cash and no easy way to raise revenues from the usual suspects, I suspect the internet which everyone uses will come under the spotlight quite soon.

It must happen, its logical, anything that becomes popular and something you cant do without will eventually become highly taxed.

At the moment it is almost free! A group of nieghbours can get together and share a connection with a good router, I know I am one of them....costs me some tomatoes now and again!

This cant last they will surely see it as a revenue spinner and demand that all users above 16 or 18 pay a yearly fee or licence to the govt for the privilage of using it.

Think like a treasury official...its logical captain!

Question is.....how could they do it? would they get away with it? how would the yoof react to bieng given a bill!

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Think like a treasury official...its logical captain!

Question is.....how could they do it? would they get away with it? how would the yoof react to bieng given a bill!

...yep...and like car radios and caravan TVs you will need a separate licence for mobile phones / notebooks and other portable internet appliances....good way of reducing the deficit ....get on with it..... :rolleyes:

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This cant last they will surely see it as a revenue spinner and demand that all users above 16 or 18 pay a yearly fee or licence to the govt for the privilage of using it.

How? Say I get one of those fancy 50 Mbit connections and share it with my neighbours. From the perspective of an external viewer, all they see is a busy firewall - it is hiding a bunch of PCs behind it. They could infer that because I simultaneously looking at, er, carbide drills and knitting that I am probably two people, but that would be a legal bloodbath.

The only possible way is (I think) to implement some sort of sales tax, but that is incredibly difficult to manage. The problem with the internet is that for the technically minded, there is always a way round the government, unless they become desperately authoritarian.

There is a looming problem here for telcos as they supply big pipes to people's homes. Unless you're downloading HD, you don't need anything like 50Mbit. So I could get one of these fibre connections, and supply phone and internet services to my neighbours for £5 a month. They wouldn't need a phone line any more.

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They probably will, and when they do I'll pack it in. I dislike paying any more tax than I absolutely have to given what it is squandered on.

It's a fun diversion but I do other things, and will do more of those.

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As I've said on other threads, my problem is the TOTAL TAX LEVEL and not how it is collected.

So I don't really care if there is an internet tax - what I care about is that the TOTAL tax level in this country is roughly double what it should be. Halve taxes. Halve government spending. The spending review is a good start, but all that does is plug the leak, it doesn't deal with the flooded kitchen.

That said, I don't think there will be an internet tax, and i think the BBC licence fee may well be abolished within the next 20 years to be replaced by a pay-as-you-go fee for TV and BBC website.

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How? Say I get one of those fancy 50 Mbit connections and share it with my neighbours. From the perspective of an external viewer, all they see is a busy firewall - it is hiding a bunch of PCs behind it. They could infer that because I simultaneously looking at, er, carbide drills and knitting that I am probably two people, but that would be a legal bloodbath.

You get more than one person simultaneously being on different sites in one household anyway with domestic hubs. I certainly spend hours on knitting sites, and I'm fairly sure my teenage son regularly looks at carbide drills until well into the early hours.

How could they know the devices connected to the internet were in the same house/flat etc., or different ones?

Having said that, they could always demand that ISPs pay a certain amount for every static address used, and leave it up to the ISPs whether they would pass the cost on to the customers. As if there'd be any doubt about that.

Edit: punctuation

Edited by Snugglybear

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A group of nieghbours can get together and share a connection with a good router,

Almost certainly a breach of contract by the person who took out the residential broadband package.

They should have a business package and declare how many users attach.

There are ways of doing this that require some networking expertise & additional kit that would be less detectable.

Probably still a breach of contract though.

Possibly a third way (where available) is to have a declared shared business fibre link and get huge bandwidth for about the cost each of individual ADSL over copper? More bang for buck & nobody's going to get sued.

Could well see a TV licence style tax.

Could argue that govts. have been smart here by letting the Internet become deeply embedded in millions of people's lives

before moving to tax it.

Then they will screw it up by having stupid exemptions for the disabled, old, poor etc. driving up the cost of the license :angry:

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Whilst they've been banging on about inclusivity and having to get every last person online I don't think so.

They may clamp down on anyone not declaring their earnings from ebay and adsense though.

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How? Say I get one of those fancy 50 Mbit connections and share it with my neighbours. From the perspective of an external viewer, all they see is a busy firewall - it is hiding a bunch of PCs behind it. They could infer that because I simultaneously looking at, er, carbide drills and knitting that I am probably two people, but that would be a legal bloodbath.

The only possible way is (I think) to implement some sort of sales tax, but that is incredibly difficult to manage. The problem with the internet is that for the technically minded, there is always a way round the government, unless they become desperately authoritarian.

There is a looming problem here for telcos as they supply big pipes to people's homes. Unless you're downloading HD, you don't need anything like 50Mbit. So I could get one of these fibre connections, and supply phone and internet services to my neighbours for £5 a month. They wouldn't need a phone line any more.

Well, ISPs can profile your connection and what's connected to it in considerable detail. Only when they have come across suspicious activity though.

Whether they use this to extract cash from delinquent customers is entirely a business decision based on the likely yield vs. considerations of negative PR, diversion of expensive management time etc.

Personally I wouldn't get involved but if I felt I had to it would be as a client, not the holder of the primary connection - too risky.

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You dont need to log on to use a radio or tv!

...no you switch on ....what's that got to do with the price of butter.....?....and anyway you can watch TV and listen to the radio on your mobile phone / notebook.... :rolleyes:

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  • 152 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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