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Not sure if its possible to cut out stress - I have always been a compulsive worrier, it gets worse on holidays - the only time I can cut out worry is with booze, being very busy or exercise.

Recently been getting work stress - I have been trying to imagine I am a millionaire - so I only work for the the fun of it, and quit anytime i like, or just think like everything is perfect.

I'm not being nasty, but you make me laugh!

99% of millionaires have 'personal councillors' who relieve them of a good percentage of their lolly - just talking about the mundane!

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Because my problems are all my own doing. I think too much instead of getting on and doing something about it. I often then get angry at myself as lots of people in the world are dealing with far worse.

Stupidity has saved many a man from going mad :)

Thinking too much is a big problem. Type A Personalities often think too much.

People sin, but people are also sinned against. Whilst some of your problems are undoubtedly of your own making, as they are for us all, I doubt you are to blame for everything that you feel is wrong in your life. So be kind to yourself and stop beating yourself up.

Mindfulness Meditation, Dru Yoga, Tai Chi (the relaxing kind) are all good ways to clear your mind.

Stop Thinking, Start Living is a good book.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Stop-Thinking-Start-Living-Happiness/dp/0722535473

The Power of Now is also good

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Power-Now-Guide-Spiritual-Enlightenment/dp/0340733500/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1283371158&sr=1-1

Everything is relative. Yes, you look at what is happening in the World and you feel awful as you realise that you have so much more than billions. You feel guilt and you beat yourself up.

But everything is relative. Your problems are no worse or no better than the problems of anyone else - just different. But they are equally as important and valid to you so... stop beating yourself up.

Only you can do this.

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Stupidity has saved many a man from going mad :)

Thinking too much is a big problem. Type A Personalities often think too much.

People sin, but people are also sinned against. Whilst some of your problems are undoubtedly of your own making, as they are for us all, I doubt you are to blame for everything that you feel is wrong in your life. So be kind to yourself and stop beating yourself up.

Mindfulness Meditation, Dru Yoga, Tai Chi (the relaxing kind) are all good ways to clear your mind.

Stop Thinking, Start Living is a good book.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Stop-Thinking-Start-Living-Happiness/dp/0722535473

The Power of Now is also good

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Power-Now-Guide-Spiritual-Enlightenment/dp/0340733500/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1283371158&sr=1-1

Everything is relative. Yes, you look at what is happening in the World and you feel awful as you realise that you have so much more than billions. You feel guilt and you beat yourself up.

But everything is relative. Your problems are no worse or no better than the problems of anyone else - just different. But they are equally as important and valid to you so... stop beating yourself up.

Only you can do this.

Thanks, I will check out those two books (I had already heard of the power of now).

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I weaned myself off the Seroxat (nasty night sweats), and became a normal, but stronger, person for it.

Avoid Seroxat like the plague. It has one hell of a reputation.

My mother was on it for a while, for depression. The problems arrived when she came off it. She went literally insane for a while. A complete breakdown.

I recall one night she convinced herself there were dead people in the house, and told passers by, who in turn told the police. Next we have a load of over-excited cops in the house looking for bodies. That was a bad time.

Why some medical drugs are still legal is beyond me.

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For frequent panic attacks, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is the best treatment.

For general anxiety, CBT is also very good indeed.

CBT is being made more easily available on the NHS: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Improving_Access_to_Psychological_Therapies

Try searching IAPT on local NHS service websites. Alternatively, try the BABCP website: http://www.babcp.com/

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It's really making my life a misery at the moment.

I'm trying all sorts, that visualisation crap, magnesium, Valerian, cutting out caffeine, cutting out alcohol, Rooibos tea, chiropracters, but nothing seems to be working. I don't know whether it's that I've just started a new job and the stress is just becoming a generalised anxiety.

It manifests itself in muscle spasms which affect my back and neck muscles so I'm either cramped up at work or slouching, really not pleasant :(

What do the HPC doctors say? ;)

I'm thinking about acupuncture...

Deep down it's because you know you could be a better person and you are afraid of what you're going to do or say next.

Example; that thread you started about having no sympathy for the Pakistanis caught up in the flood because they're all terrorists.

That's not a thread that a "good person" would start.

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Posture is a HUGE issue - if you work crouched over, hunched over, humped over a PC your posture gets screwed up and, worst of all, you move from being a stomach/diaphragm breather to becoming a chest breather.

This results in something called silent hyperventilation or hyperventilation syndrome which alters the balance of Oxygen and CO2 in your body which results in some or all of the following - light-headedness, tingling in the limbs, light-headedness, waking up tired, a build up of lactic acid in the muscles in your upper back and chest, tight chest, feeling frightened, dry throat/mouth, chest pains, stroke-like symptoms and, worst of all, frightening panic attacks with heart attack-like symptoms.

Here is a link to Hyperventilation Syndrome:

http://allergyclinic.co.nz/guides/47.html

Excellent advice there TMT.

Anxiety affects traders. If they are trading badly, they can slip into the lizard syndrome, a panic frozen state caused in part by the shallow breathing, build up of lactic acid and mental incoherence ("this cannot be happening to me!") otherwise known as the "fight or flight" response. Symptoms are short shallow breaths, clammy hands and feet, dry mouth, difficulty focusing and a need to pee much more than usual.

The good news is you can train yourself to have high coherence and if you are serious about it and are desk bound, there is a tool from emWave which monitors your heart rhythms. If X-Quork were still around, no doubt he'd dismiss all this as mumbo-jumbo pseudo science. I know it works and TMT does too. So did the ancients, this knowledge is embedded within yoga practice and Buddhist meditation.

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...anxiety can be caused when you have to much to do, too many deadlines and too much going around in your head.

Try to concentrate on one job at a time, take regular breaks like going out for a walk, breathing exercises help...most importantly get help to get a good nights sleep....that is the time when you head starts spinning, worrying about what might or might not happen.....so you are then even more tired for the next day and if you are not careful it can turn into a vicious circle.

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This results in something called silent hyperventilation or hyperventilation syndrome which alters the balance of Oxygen and CO2 in your body which results in some or all of the following - light-headedness, tingling in the limbs, light-headedness, waking up tired, a build up of lactic acid in the muscles in your upper back and chest, tight chest, feeling frightened, dry throat/mouth, chest pains, stroke-like symptoms and, worst of all, frightening panic attacks with heart attack-like symptoms.

Here is a link to Hyperventilation Syndrome:

http://allergyclinic.co.nz/guides/47.html

Once you learn about hyperventilation syndrome or silent hyperventilation you become aware that you are doing it yourself and, when you look around at people, you realise thousands of people are doing it. Actually, one response to stress is the body moving from breathing deep and correctly in the stomach to breathing badly and wrongly in the upper chest. So many of us are stressed.

+ 10000000 to the Hyperventilation Syndrome answer.

I had this (and still do get it sometimes) about 15 years back. I am an habitually shallow breather, probably due to my asthma and I fell into a pattern of hyperventilating without realising it. I suffered months of lots of the horrid symptoms you mentioned. The doctor thought I had an ulcer and prescribed medicine for that which of course didn't help. I had panic attacks where I thought I was dying. I was often away of my own heartbeat (frightening) and so on. I only got over the problem when my mother read an article (in the Daily Mail of all places) about HVS (Hyperventilation Syndrome) and realised I was having exactly the same symptoms. Within days of focusing on proper breathing all my symptoms went away.

OP - take a close look at your breathing pattern and posture. TMT's advice on HVS is spot on.

I still get the odd attack now and then but when I get them I know that it's my breathing gone awry again and I correct it. It can be a bit of a problem when you have a panic attack while driving (high bridges and heights generally are triggers for me, along with heavy motorway traffic) but as long as you realise that you're not going to die and concentrate on improving your breathing then you can cope fairly well.

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+ 10000000 to the Hyperventilation Syndrome answer.

I had this (and still do get it sometimes) about 15 years back. I am an habitually shallow breather, probably due to my asthma and I fell into a pattern of hyperventilating without realising it. I suffered months of lots of the horrid symptoms you mentioned. The doctor thought I had an ulcer and prescribed medicine for that which of course didn't help. I had panic attacks where I thought I was dying. I was often away of my own heartbeat (frightening) and so on. I only got over the problem when my mother read an article (in the Daily Mail of all places) about HVS (Hyperventilation Syndrome) and realised I was having exactly the same symptoms. Within days of focusing on proper breathing all my symptoms went away.

OP - take a close look at your breathing pattern and posture. TMT's advice on HVS is spot on.

I still get the odd attack now and then but when I get them I know that it's my breathing gone awry again and I correct it. It can be a bit of a problem when you have a panic attack while driving (high bridges and heights generally are triggers for me, along with heavy motorway traffic) but as long as you realise that you're not going to die and concentrate on improving your breathing then you can cope fairly well.

I could have written this.

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Yes!

I first went to the Dr a few years ago with a bad back and muscle spasms. He said it was anxiety and I almost laughed the charlatan out of the room.

Within three or four months I developed panic attacks, breathing problems, etc. Turns out the Dr was right all along.

try googling 'magnesium deficiency symptoms'

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OK ladies. Your opinion on my symptoms please:

Currently looking at a possible permanent move abroad to live with my girlfriend, giving up a well paid job to face financial uncertainty. This would be a big change for me in every respect. Spoke to family about it and they're not overly keen - mother particularly.

This seems to have caused:

Feelings of hopelessness about the future. Inability to make decisions. Very tired and down especially in the evenings, sometimes unable to connect my brain to my mouth and even speak. Constantly annoyed, irritated by small things. Getting flustered and panicky if put under pressure.

I've always been a bit like this, but kept it under control with reframing and other cognitive methods. Seems to be getting much harder to bear now though.

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OK ladies. Your opinion on my symptoms please:

Currently looking at a possible permanent move abroad to live with my girlfriend, giving up a well paid job to face financial uncertainty. This would be a big change for me in every respect. Spoke to family about it and they're not overly keen - mother particularly.

This seems to have caused:

Feelings of hopelessness about the future. Inability to make decisions. Very tired and down especially in the evenings, sometimes unable to connect my brain to my mouth and even speak. Constantly annoyed, irritated by small things. Getting flustered and panicky if put under pressure.

I've always been a bit like this, but kept it under control with reframing and other cognitive methods. Seems to be getting much harder to bear now though.

Moving abroad is an enormous step, especially if you have anxiety issues. It may turn out to be the best thing that you do but...

You are bound to have doubts - about the move, about finding work, about your relationship, about how your anxiety will deal with the move.

Leaving behind your safety net and your support network - your locality can be a support network - is a huge, huge step.

Then again, you may have loads of issues from your past that you need to deal with?

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Because my problems are all my own doing. I think too much instead of getting on and doing something about it. I often then get angry at myself as lots of people in the world are dealing with far worse.

I am absolutely useless at advising people on emotional problems, but your posts stand out.

Have to say - connect with people, stop looking inward. Other people are worse off, as you recognise, so give thanks. Have sex. Pay for it. Take a break. Blow some money. Give presents. Explore what's around you.

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You have to force yourself out.

One of the worst things that can come from anxiety & depression is the fear of going out - agoraphobia. You have to nip this in the bud right now otherwise it will destroy your life.

Believe me, it will destroy your life.

But where would he then find the time to start all them Climate change threads? :lol:

Seriously though I agree -with TMT. an evening walk does wonders after a day at the PC.

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I have been suffering from Anxiety as a result of being 38 days away from moving to the Mid East and having 5 million things to do. A few months back I started to get pins and needles in my feet and hands. Went to the Docs thinking I had MS or Motor Neurone. Doc did all the neurological responses and said I was fine - he diagnosed anxiety related parathesia that is caused by chronic hyperventilation and thus two low co2 levels in the blood

Treatment - take long slow deep breaths :lol:

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I have breathing problems too - I breathe from the chest and have become a very, very shallow breather - don't think it's doing me any good at all. Never feel like I'm getting enough air into my lungs, even when I try. The interesting thing is that one of the reasons why I think this has happened is, ironically, vanity. I've always been thin, I'm thinner than ever now, but because of a condition I was born with, I have a rather slack abdominal muscles which leaves me with a pot belly. Which I 'suck in' all of the time. I just do it automatically now. Started to get a tingling pain at the base of my spine which I think gets a bit worse when I tighten up my abdominals.

I think too much, and work stresses me out more than it should. I also find it increasingly difficult to concentrate on anything - even when I'm writing this post I've stopped and gone to several different sites as I type this. If I'm reading something online I can't even seem to concentrate on that - I tend to have several tabs open and switch between them. I get 'brain fog' a lot.

I think the reason for a lot of depression/anxiety is down to the relationships we have with others, or sometimes lack of them. Most working 'relationships' are completely superficial and I find myself in a situation where I'm in my mid 20's and have virtually no social life outside of the people I talk to in work. Nobody in work socialises outside of work and to be honest most of them only seem to want to talk about work anyway. Most of the people I knew in my teens/early 20's seem to be in relationships where they spend time with no one else, or we've just gone our separate ways. There are maybe 3 people who I would individually meet up with once every few months for a catch up but that's it.

It's difficult to know how to break out of this though. Very frustrating to be by yourself on evenings/weekends/holidays and not know how to change this situation.

Rant over.

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Moving abroad is an enormous step, especially if you have anxiety issues. It may turn out to be the best thing that you do but...

You are bound to have doubts - about the move, about finding work, about your relationship, about how your anxiety will deal with the move.

Leaving behind your safety net and your support network - your locality can be a support network - is a huge, huge step.

Then again, you may have loads of issues from your past that you need to deal with?

Thanks. No, I don' t have any past issues I think. My main worry is leaving my mother behind (although my sister lives nearby) and the fact that she took the idea badly didn't help. I think it's just a case of 'I used to be decisive, but now I'm not so sure'!

I've been finding the stomach-out breathing VERY helpful. It's almost like a shot of whisky in calming the nerves. I'm also cutting down on sugar in my diet as I suspect fluctuating blood sugar levels aren't helping. In addition I'm taking a vitamin supplement and St John's wort.

My girlfriend is being very supportive and we're trying to look at ways towards a gradual move, a bit like this man:

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I have breathing problems too - I breathe from the chest and have become a very, very shallow breather - don't think it's doing me any good at all. Never feel like I'm getting enough air into my lungs, even when I try. The interesting thing is that one of the reasons why I think this has happened is, ironically, vanity. I've always been thin, I'm thinner than ever now, but because of a condition I was born with, I have a rather slack abdominal muscles which leaves me with a pot belly. Which I 'suck in' all of the time. I just do it automatically now. Started to get a tingling pain at the base of my spine which I think gets a bit worse when I tighten up my abdominals.

I think too much, and work stresses me out more than it should. I also find it increasingly difficult to concentrate on anything - even when I'm writing this post I've stopped and gone to several different sites as I type this. If I'm reading something online I can't even seem to concentrate on that - I tend to have several tabs open and switch between them. I get 'brain fog' a lot.

I think the reason for a lot of depression/anxiety is down to the relationships we have with others, or sometimes lack of them. Most working 'relationships' are completely superficial and I find myself in a situation where I'm in my mid 20's and have virtually no social life outside of the people I talk to in work. Nobody in work socialises outside of work and to be honest most of them only seem to want to talk about work anyway. Most of the people I knew in my teens/early 20's seem to be in relationships where they spend time with no one else, or we've just gone our separate ways. There are maybe 3 people who I would individually meet up with once every few months for a catch up but that's it.

It's difficult to know how to break out of this though. Very frustrating to be by yourself on evenings/weekends/holidays and not know how to change this situation.

Rant over.

The extent to which I was hyperventilating earlier in the year was shocking looking back. It was work stress and toxic relationships at work. Had a course of acupuncture to sort the breathing out and have spent as much time outdoors as I could.

Recognising the situation and the desire to change it is half the battle.

But I am having huge concentration problems, just as you described! I have always been focused and single minded when needed but now I flit about and avoid.

In regards to making new friends the old classic of sharing a hobby via a club could help, maybe cycling?

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Magnesium Citrate has done wonders for me. I've been taking Solgars and Now Foods brand at 400mg a day with no calcium. Calms the muscles (I lift heavy weights) and gives me a very deep sleep when I take it before bed.

Now I'm looking at taking Zinc as a zinc tally test has shown me to be mildly deficient.

I've seen some supplements that bundle calcium in with the zinc. Doesn't calcium block zinc absorbtion? :blink:

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=280422118873

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