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It's really making my life a misery at the moment.

I'm trying all sorts, that visualisation crap, magnesium, Valerian, cutting out caffeine, cutting out alcohol, Rooibos tea, chiropracters, but nothing seems to be working. I don't know whether it's that I've just started a new job and the stress is just becoming a generalised anxiety.

It manifests itself in muscle spasms which affect my back and neck muscles so I'm either cramped up at work or slouching, really not pleasant :(

What do the HPC doctors say? ;)

I'm thinking about acupuncture...

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Yes I do although it is generally social related. Do certain situations trigger it? You'll be surprised how many people suffer from it in some capacity or another.

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Yes I do although it is generally social related. Do certain situations trigger it? You'll be surprised how many people suffer from it in some capacity or another.

It's mainly social I think.. In work it is generally the worst time, or when I am not feeling good/confident.

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It's mainly social I think.. In work it is generally the worst time, or when I am not feeling good/confident.

See your Doc you maybe need a short course of meds.

Anxiety is a common condition and is thought to be caused by a lack of serotonin in the brain..

Don't feel anxious about seeing the Doc just go and do it. If you don't you could run the risk of full blown stress leading into depression.

Look here for additional help.....

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Yes!

I first went to the Dr a few years ago with a bad back and muscle spasms. He said it was anxiety and I almost laughed the charlatan out of the room.

Within three or four months I developed panic attacks, breathing problems, etc. Turns out the Dr was right all along.

I tried all of the obvious stuff e.g. cutting out caffeine. It had a limited impact.

I then read a book that gave me a shove in the right direction - Claire Weekes - Self Help For Your Nerves.

I've made a few mental changes since - slowing down a bit, taking life a bit less seriously, making sure I have time off etc. I'm no there yet, but tweaking my outlook has been more effective than all of the supplements / diet changes etc combined.

You have to look at yourself, accept your flaws, and work at changing your thought processes. Difficult, but this is the only way to make a long term change.

Good luck..... it's horrible.... PM me if you like to discuss any of the above.

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It's really making my life a misery at the moment.

I'm trying all sorts, that visualisation crap, magnesium, Valerian, cutting out caffeine, cutting out alcohol, Rooibos tea, chiropracters, but nothing seems to be working. I don't know whether it's that I've just started a new job and the stress is just becoming a generalised anxiety.

It manifests itself in muscle spasms which affect my back and neck muscles so I'm either cramped up at work or slouching, really not pleasant :(

What do the HPC doctors say? ;)

I'm thinking about acupuncture...

Not sure if its possible to cut out stress - I have always been a compulsive worrier, it gets worse on holidays - the only time I can cut out worry is with booze, being very busy or exercise.

Recently been getting work stress - I have been trying to imagine I am a millionaire - so I only work for the the fun of it, and quit anytime i like, or just think like everything is perfect.

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Yes, and stress and overwork is the trigger. Cutting coffee, herbs, yoga, massage, etc. can all help but I find that if you're often under too much stress there's really nothing much you can do other than target the root cause.

There's a difference between the stress that speeds you along and keeps you on your toes and the cumulative stress that gnaws away at you over the weeks or months and leaves you shattered, with physical ailments, and yes 'anxiety like symptoms' - feeling spacey, fight or flighty, run down, not yourself, odd pins and needles, reducing hobbies and social engagements, aches and pains so bad you can think you have rheumatism.

I now mange my stress levels pretty well but I remember that as I'd never really had true stress at all until, frankly, there was too much on my plate and too many unreasonable demands it took me a while to see that was the root cause of why I was feeling shagged out and poorly too often. That's the thing with stress - it's easy to think it's for lily-livered wussies until you get a proper dose of it and you get caught cold.

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I used to think only weak people got stressed until I got a belt of it........

The important thing is to recognise the problems and be prepared to do something about it.

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Starting a new job is always a bit of a lark! I've just started a new one I feel completely buggerised.

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Starting a new job is always a bit of a lark! I've just started a new one I feel completely buggerised.

Thank you Mr Haigue...did you have "relations" with that young man?

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Thanks for all the advice folks, I'll start working through the ideas.

Not sure if its possible to cut out stress - I have always been a compulsive worrier, it gets worse on holidays - the only time I can cut out worry is with booze, being very busy or exercise.

Recently been getting work stress - I have been trying to imagine I am a millionaire - so I only work for the the fun of it, and quit anytime i like, or just think like everything is perfect.

I think the initial paragraph explains where I was quite well too, I was either drinking or focussed on work and exercise in order to undo the drinking damage. Only I think that way of living has burned me out. I've not touched a drop of booze for 10 days and at the moment want to see if it is some kind of delayed withdrawal symptom that is making the anxiety spasms worse before going for medication. The problem with the anxiety is it makes you want to stay indoors, the lunchtime walk is out of the question as I'd be all cramped up by then.

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It's really making my life a misery at the moment.

I'm trying all sorts, that visualisation crap, magnesium, Valerian, cutting out caffeine, cutting out alcohol, Rooibos tea, chiropracters, but nothing seems to be working. I don't know whether it's that I've just started a new job and the stress is just becoming a generalised anxiety.

It manifests itself in muscle spasms which affect my back and neck muscles so I'm either cramped up at work or slouching, really not pleasant :(

What do the HPC doctors say? ;)

I'm thinking about acupuncture...

Tried all the above.

Went through a hellish period of about 3 years of anxiety & depression - they go hand in hand - about 5 years back and, to be honest, I still suffer from it today although, touch wood, not as bad.

I have written about it before one here and have given ideas to HPCers both on this forum and in PMs.

I have had panic attacks so bad that I have been rushed into hospital with suspected heart attacks - terrible things and have been thoroughly checked out by heart docs several times.

There is no short, quick fix but here are some things to consider.

Cutting out caffeine and alcohol is a good thing and I swear by taking good magnesium citrate supplements - Natures Best sell the best IMPO.

I swear by 'The Anxiety & Phobia Workbook' by Edmund J. Bourne - he brings out an updated one almost yearly now. Many libraries carry a copy.

Posture is a HUGE issue - if you work crouched over, hunched over, humped over a PC your posture gets screwed up and, worst of all, you move from being a stomach/diaphragm breather to becoming a chest breather.

This results in something called silent hyperventilation or hyperventilation syndrome which alters the balance of Oxygen and CO2 in your body which results in some or all of the following - light-headedness, tingling in the limbs, light-headedness, waking up tired, a build up of lactic acid in the muscles in your upper back and chest, tight chest, feeling frightened, dry throat/mouth, chest pains, stroke-like symptoms and, worst of all, frightening panic attacks with heart attack-like symptoms.

Here is a link to Hyperventilation Syndrome:

http://allergyclinic.co.nz/guides/47.html

Once you learn about hyperventilation syndrome or silent hyperventilation you become aware that you are doing it yourself and, when you look around at people, you realise thousands of people are doing it. Actually, one response to stress is the body moving from breathing deep and correctly in the stomach to breathing badly and wrongly in the upper chest. So many of us are stressed.

Another reason why people become chest breathers is the obsession with the 6-pack, the flat stomach and people simply buying trousers, underwear, skirts with too tight a waistband - I now buy all my trousers in a waist size too big. Yes, it sounds silly but experts in hyperventilation will tell you that too tight clothing around the waist can result in serious breathing problems.

Once you begin to breath via the chest you lower the CO2 levels in your body and your brain adapts to this making it hard to change back. You have to retrain yourself to breath again properly and one of the best resources are the books written by these Kiwi experts:

http://www.breathingworks.com/products.htm

Dru Yoga and Tai Chi is excellent for panic attacks re all of the above as Dru Yoga, in particular, has the right excercises to help correct hyperventilation syndrome and also excercises to stretch the muscles in the upper back, around the sternum, shoulders and chest.

You need to look at your posture - again Dru Yoga will help (as would seeing an osteopath and simply asking him for an opinion on your posture) - and get someone to tell you if you are hunched over, if you have a hump developing in your upper back and whether your shoulders are hunched or rolled forward. I suspect they are - again, something like Dru Yoga will help you to drop your shoulders. In fact, you need to educate yourself to consciously drop your shoulders 4 or 5 times an hour every hour whilst awake.

I could write a book on this.

Take some Vitamin D3 with your Magnesium and balance it with Calcium but not too much Calcium.

Hunched over computers or over a desk is no good so you need to address your breathing, your posture and get the right relaxation.

Finally, I started this by saying that you are probably suffering from anxiety & depression because they go hand in hand. You need to be really, brutally honest with yourself and ask yourself what is going on in your life, or has gone on in the past, that is potentially causing your anxiety and stress now. It might be your job but it might be manifesting itself in your job, or you think it is your job, when it is something that went on in the past?

Maybe something that happened in another job or back in school? Perhaps you have self-esteem issues about not being good enough and being found out? Perhaps you were bullied as a child? Perhaps you were a bully? Perhaps you were ingrained with feelings of inferiority? Perhaps you were rejected and fear being rejected from your job and your colleagues? Perhaps, perhaps, perhaps.

This is all real deep stuff and probably can only be addressed by talking to a professional counsellor. The first book that I mentioned will give you some pointers on this.

I hope this helps you. It is a terrible thing to happen. A man who has to conquer his own fears knows the true meanin of valour and anxiety and panic attacks are impossible to describe unless you have had one.

I wish you all the best.

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Thanks for all the advice folks, I'll start working through the ideas.

I think the initial paragraph explains where I was quite well too, I was either drinking or focussed on work and exercise in order to undo the drinking damage. Only I think that way of living has burned me out. I've not touched a drop of booze for 10 days and at the moment want to see if it is some kind of delayed withdrawal symptom that is making the anxiety spasms worse before going for medication. The problem with the anxiety is it makes you want to stay indoors, the lunchtime walk is out of the question as I'd be all cramped up by then.

You have to force yourself out.

One of the worst things that can come from anxiety & depression is the fear of going out - agoraphobia. You have to nip this in the bud right now otherwise it will destroy your life.

Believe me, it will destroy your life.

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I suffered for a few years with this too, in my experience I would avoid the meds if you can. They effectively alter your reality, and life is like looking at everything through the lens of a camera - you are 'detached', but still 'around'.

Funnily enough, it was acupuncture that sorted me out. I weaned myself off the Seroxat (nasty night sweats), and became a normal, but stronger, person for it. Acupuncture effectively unblocks the emotional channels & brings balance to it all.

Sounds airy-fairy, but it works. The accupuncturist used to put one small needle in the side of my small toe, and my whole body & head would go floppy - you can't argue with that in terms of it not being effective.

Again, happy for you to PM if you want more info.

g

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You have to force yourself out.

One of the worst things that can come from anxiety & depression is the fear of going out - agoraphobia. You have to nip this in the bud right now otherwise it will destroy your life.

Believe me, it will destroy your life.

I think I have this and the more I give in to it the worse it gets; I sometimes go a month without really talking to anyone. I seriously need to sort my life out before I die.

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I think I have this and the more I give in to it the worse it gets; I sometimes go a month without really talking to anyone. I seriously need to sort my life out before I die.

OK, would you like to tell us more about it?

Why don't you talk to anyone?

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Tried all the above.

Went through a hellish period of about 3 years of anxiety & depression - they go hand in hand - about 5 years back and, to be honest, I still suffer from it today although, touch wood, not as bad.

I have written about it before one here and have given ideas to HPCers both on this forum and in PMs.

I have had panic attacks so bad that I have been rushed into hospital with suspected heart attacks - terrible things and have been thoroughly checked out by heart docs several times.

There is no short, quick fix but here are some things to consider.

Cutting out caffeine and alcohol is a good thing and I swear by taking good magnesium citrate supplements - Natures Best sell the best IMPO.

I swear by 'The Anxiety & Phobia Workbook' by Edmund J. Bourne - he brings out an updated one almost yearly now. Many libraries carry a copy.

Posture is a HUGE issue - if you work crouched over, hunched over, humped over a PC your posture gets screwed up and, worst of all, you move from being a stomach/diaphragm breather to becoming a chest breather.

This results in something called silent hyperventilation or hyperventilation syndrome which alters the balance of Oxygen and CO2 in your body which results in some or all of the following - light-headedness, tingling in the limbs, light-headedness, waking up tired, a build up of lactic acid in the muscles in your upper back and chest, tight chest, feeling frightened, dry throat/mouth, chest pains, stroke-like symptoms and, worst of all, frightening panic attacks with heart attack-like symptoms.

Here is a link to Hyperventilation Syndrome:

http://allergyclinic.co.nz/guides/47.html

Once you learn about hyperventilation syndrome or silent hyperventilation you become aware that you are doing it yourself and, when you look around at people, you realise thousands of people are doing it. Actually, one response to stress is the body moving from breathing deep and correctly in the stomach to breathing badly and wrongly in the upper chest. So many of us are stressed.

Another reason why people become chest breathers is the obsession with the 6-pack, the flat stomach and people simply buying trousers, underwear, skirts with too tight a waistband - I now buy all my trousers in a waist size too big. Yes, it sounds silly but experts in hyperventilation will tell you that too tight clothing around the waist can result in serious breathing problems.

Once you begin to breath via the chest you lower the CO2 levels in your body and your brain adapts to this making it hard to change back. You have to retrain yourself to breath again properly and one of the best resources are the books written by these Kiwi experts:

http://www.breathingworks.com/products.htm

Dru Yoga and Tai Chi is excellent for panic attacks re all of the above as Dru Yoga, in particular, has the right excercises to help correct hyperventilation syndrome and also excercises to stretch the muscles in the upper back, around the sternum, shoulders and chest.

You need to look at your posture - again Dru Yoga will help (as would seeing an osteopath and simply asking him for an opinion on your posture) - and get someone to tell you if you are hunched over, if you have a hump developing in your upper back and whether your shoulders are hunched or rolled forward. I suspect they are - again, something like Dru Yoga will help you to drop your shoulders. In fact, you need to educate yourself to consciously drop your shoulders 4 or 5 times an hour every hour whilst awake.

I could write a book on this.

Take some Vitamin D3 with your Magnesium and balance it with Calcium but not too much Calcium.

Hunched over computers or over a desk is no good so you need to address your breathing, your posture and get the right relaxation.

Finally, I started this by saying that you are probably suffering from anxiety & depression because they go hand in hand. You need to be really, brutally honest with yourself and ask yourself what is going on in your life, or has gone on in the past, that is potentially causing your anxiety and stress now. It might be your job but it might be manifesting itself in your job, or you think it is your job, when it is something that went on in the past?

Maybe something that happened in another job or back in school? Perhaps you have self-esteem issues about not being good enough and being found out? Perhaps you were bullied as a child? Perhaps you were a bully? Perhaps you were ingrained with feelings of inferiority? Perhaps you were rejected and fear being rejected from your job and your colleagues? Perhaps, perhaps, perhaps.

This is all real deep stuff and probably can only be addressed by talking to a professional counsellor. The first book that I mentioned will give you some pointers on this.

I hope this helps you. It is a terrible thing to happen. A man who has to conquer his own fears knows the true meanin of valour and anxiety and panic attacks are impossible to describe unless you have had one.

I wish you all the best.

Thanks! i didn't realise I was doing this. After a few minutes of deep breathing I feel a lot better. Is this why I feel tired all of time?

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See your GP. Ask for Counselling with a therapist from MIND.

It does help.

Be brave, you are not alone. Many of the best of us suffer too.

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Accupuncture can certainly be really helpful for physiological problems I found - I had a trapped nerve in my neck, got frozen shoudler and tennis elbow.

However, if this down to anxiety worth going along to your G.P. and see what they've got going on in the area with CBT therapy as it's very helpful for anxiety and at the moment there's been extra money put into providing groups and self-help support in most areas of the UK.

Second making yourself going out for that walk! Really important and avoidance will reinforce your problems.

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I would suggest not coming to this website if you can would do you the most good, use leech block

I have been on here less of late due to a lot of work in fact, plus DIY to the house etc etc and I fell much less stressed

Too much worry over HPC that will happen or it wont, nothing you can do about it!

I have decided need to live life more, spend more time with my family, got young kids and before you know it they will be all grown up..........

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OK, would you like to tell us more about it?

Why don't you talk to anyone?

Because my problems are all my own doing. I think too much instead of getting on and doing something about it. I often then get angry at myself as lots of people in the world are dealing with far worse.

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Thanks! i didn't realise I was doing this. After a few minutes of deep breathing I feel a lot better. Is this why I feel tired all of time?

Hyperventilation will exhaust you amongst many other things. People even do silent hyperventilation when they sleep and then wake up feeling exhausted often with black circles under the eyes.

Watch a baby that is being man-handled by people - the baby gets stressed and begins breathing using the chest. Put the baby down, let it relax or fall asleep and within a few minutes it goes back to breathing using the diaphragm.

Watch a child when it is hysterical - loads of chest breathing, loads of chest movement exhausting the chest muscles and making them very sore.

A good way to retrain yourself to breath properly is to lie down on your back, place a cushion under your head for support and then place one hand on your chest and the other one on your stomach. Breath in by raising your stomach and your hand on the stomach should rise and the one on your chest barely move at all.

Some people place a book on their stomach to do this.

Breathe in and out slowly using your diaphragm and you will begin to feel relaxed within a few minutes.

It can take months of doing this exercise daily to retrain yourself to breathe properly.

Don't wear too tight clothing. All that holding in your stomach and 6 pack stuff can do you more harm than good.

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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