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Divorcing In The Uk

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Well, I am inching through a financial settlement in the UK, and something that has becoming more and more obvious is that if you are trying to avoid court for the financial settlement, the slower side can take as long as it wants with no - and i mean NO - negative impacts, as if it does go to court no consideration can be made on delaying tactics when considering the settlement (as long as either side hasn't held things up by hiding data from the court - I mean its fine if a side takes, say, six months to consider each offer, 4 weeks to reply to letters etc).

This, historically, benefits the 'poorer' party (normally the woman) as it means if you hold things up for, say, 2-3 years, you can pretty much guarantee that the 'pot' to be split by a court or mutual settlement will have grown with bonuses, windfalls, investments, maybe even inheritences, etc etc. If you are splitting monies and housing for wife and kids is a consideration, houseprices have also normally gone up and so you can demand 'more'.

However - with a HPC beginning to be unavoidable - and actually having happened in parts of the nation (see wales, northern ireland, etc), anyone out there going through this - or thinking of - might want to ask their lawyers to consider what happens if purchase prices drop 25% in their area, and how much that redraws the pot split. I know it's going to have a big beneficial impact on me, for between 25-50k just on price falls in the ex's area in the last six months. The crazy thing is that her lawyer must be not aware/advising her of this fact as she's still haggling over pennies.....

note, i guess this doesnt work so much if there is an existing property/family home I think. (hint - sell the bugger quick and rent if you are certain divorce is coming)

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It's not just housing.

I rememeber in the news, some chap split with his wife in 2007, he then lost a shed load on the commercial property and shares he had and tried to get some money back from the ex. I can't rememeber what happened in the end, undoubtedly the man lost.

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Well, I am inching through a financial settlement in the UK, and something that has becoming more and more obvious is that if you are trying to avoid court for the financial settlement, the slower side can take as long as it wants with no - and i mean NO - negative impacts, as if it does go to court no consideration can be made on delaying tactics when considering the settlement (as long as either side hasn't held things up by hiding data from the court - I mean its fine if a side takes, say, six months to consider each offer, 4 weeks to reply to letters etc).

This, historically, benefits the 'poorer' party (normally the woman) as it means if you hold things up for, say, 2-3 years, you can pretty much guarantee that the 'pot' to be split by a court or mutual settlement will have grown with bonuses, windfalls, investments, maybe even inheritences, etc etc. If you are splitting monies and housing for wife and kids is a consideration, houseprices have also normally gone up and so you can demand 'more'.

However - with a HPC beginning to be unavoidable - and actually having happened in parts of the nation (see wales, northern ireland, etc), anyone out there going through this - or thinking of - might want to ask their lawyers to consider what happens if purchase prices drop 25% in their area, and how much that redraws the pot split. I know it's going to have a big beneficial impact on me, for between 25-50k just on price falls in the ex's area in the last six months. The crazy thing is that her lawyer must be not aware/advising her of this fact as she's still haggling over pennies.....

note, i guess this doesnt work so much if there is an existing property/family home I think. (hint - sell the bugger quick and rent if you are certain divorce is coming)

Divorce and High-Conflict People: Borderlines, Narcissists, Histrionics, Sociopaths and Other Persuasive Blamers

http://shrink4men.wordpress.com/

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This, historically, benefits the 'poorer' party (normally the woman) as it means if you hold things up for, say, 2-3 years, you can pretty much guarantee that the 'pot' to be split by a court or mutual settlement will have grown with bonuses, windfalls, investments, maybe even inheritences, etc etc. If you are splitting monies and housing for wife and kids is a consideration, houseprices have also normally gone up and so you can demand 'more'.

I have an offer on a house in that situation. Wife left in the house, grown up kids left, divorcing but not enough residual to buy outright afterwards and not enough income to buy so she has been holding onto the house, so a forced seller but holding out for more than asking price (!). I hope the falls announced today will be a bit of a shove.

My (non-working) Aunt held out for years like this whilst living in a lovely house at my (working) Uncles expense why he was in a bedsit eating beans.

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  • 152 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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