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Uriah Heap

American Apparel Going Bust

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2010/aug/25/rise-fall-american-apparel

I think we will be seeing lots of businesses that seemed to make sense only a couple of years ago beginning to lose their shine in the harsher world of actually having to earn a living from offering value.

It wasn't having oral sex with an employee in front of a female journalist that now threatens to undo Dov Charney, founder of American Apparel. Nor was it simulating oral sex with another female member of staff whom he had ordered to pretend to masturbate in front of him. The 41-year-old's professional and personal reputation isn't even on the line because at least three female employees have filed sexual harassment lawsuits against him (all the cases were settled before reaching trial); nor because he walks through his factory in his underpants and conducts meetings wearing just a thong – or a sock. The sock is not, one should add, worn on his foot.

:blink:

What do they mean by 'sock'? :unsure:

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I would probably ask you that MT. He does sound like someone you would get on with, though I wouldn't advice you to lend him any money.

American-Apparels-chairma-007.jpg

From that photo I wonder if he needs an osteopath to do a pelvic realignment? Looks a tad uncomfortable to me or maybe his belt is too tight?

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American-Apparels-chairma-007.jpg

From that photo I wonder if he needs an osteopath to do a pelvic realignment? Looks a tad uncomfortable to me or maybe his belt is too tight?

Maybe I should have questioned whether his sock is too tight? :blink:

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2010/aug/25/rise-fall-american-apparel

I think we will be seeing lots of businesses that seemed to make sense only a couple of years ago beginning to lose their shine in the harsher world of actually having to earn a living from offering value.

Ten years ago they used to make quality cotton T Shirts, now the fabric is so unbelievably thin you would have to wear four for it not to be see through. The company has been trashed.

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Ten years ago they used to make quality cotton T Shirts, now the fabric is so unbelievably thin you would have to wear four for it not to be see through. The company has been trashed.

The quality of men's high street clothing in the UK as well has fallen as low as it can get. Most of what's on offer is shoddily made, third world rags.

Looked round Burtons recently? A shop full of overpriced junk - truly the rag trade.

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Looked round Burtons recently? A shop full of overpriced junk - truly the rag trade.

Its amazing when you compare the quality of a new jacket with old, say from a charity shop. Indeed my s/h and original "crombie" coat is a job to pick up, let alone wear compared to modern day clothing and its hardly ever cold enough to justify wearing.

Also the enforced "EMO" look dictated by modern clothing stores. Tight shiny pants, with hardly enough "waist" to cover your "bits" up (designed I supposed to show off your knickers) and accompanied by pointy shoe's and you end up walking out the shop with the complete medieval court jester "look." I have never known a "look" so out of place with the times, as nearly everyone is carrying a bit extra. It worked in the 60's and 70's when people were scrawnier and "going large" or "extra fries" hadn't been invented.

Edited by Sir John Steed

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another scum bites the dust

let me explain

  • Dov Charney has been the subject of several sexual harassment lawsuits
  • he repeatedly referred to women as "sluts" and "*****" in front of employees [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dov_Charney]
  • American Apparel

(AA) bills itself as a socially conscious producer and vendor of “hip” clothing but there’s nothing progressive or admirable about supporting Israeli apartheid. On AA’s web site it is proudly asserted that AA “is part Israeli, literally.”

http://usacbi.wordpress.com/2010/03/14/american-apparel-zionist-apparel/

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He could have made it work , and good on him for not outsourcing the manufacturing.

The problem was the designs were too 'out there' - i did look into buying some stuff as i try to avoid slave labour crap but none of the designs appealed to me.It was mostly marketed to the emo/student crowd.

The items were also pricey , for example jeans from Texas Jean Co (Made in USA) cost around $30-40 US a pair.You were paying more and getting less at AA then other fair trade manufacturers.

Edited by Ruffneck

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Admired the attempt to pay a decent wage until I visited the website a few years ago. Every single one of the factory workers was of Mexican descent. I figured the wages couldn't be that great if they weren't attracting other Californians.

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Some of their stuff's not bad, although expensive for what it is.

For me, the problem with American Apparel is that I've never been comfortable with the way they market themselves.

They tried to take the Terry Richardson style of photography into the mainstream (for all I know he may actually do their campaigns), and I think it puts people off.

I think a lot of people feel the same way I do.

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Its amazing when you compare the quality of a new jacket with old, say from a charity shop. Indeed my s/h and original "crombie" coat is a job to pick up, let alone wear compared to modern day clothing and its hardly ever cold enough to justify wearing.

Also the enforced "EMO" look dictated by modern clothing stores. Tight shiny pants, with hardly enough "waist" to cover your "bits" up (designed I supposed to show off your knickers) and accompanied by pointy shoe's and you end up walking out the shop with the complete medieval court jester "look." I have never known a "look" so out of place with the times, as nearly everyone is carrying a bit extra. It worked in the 60's and 70's when people were scrawnier and "going large" or "extra fries" hadn't been invented.

To be fair, a lot of modern clothing is lighter because buildings are warmer. In most modern buildings it's too hot to wear a 9oz wool jacket, let alone a 'bulletproof' Harris tweed from the 60s. If you look at old pics the men are always wearing tweeds, pullover etc indoors. Nowadays you would pass out if you did that.

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Oddly enough, after yesterday doing some clothes' shopping and concluding that much of the material out there is thinner than 2 or 3 year old worn material, I wondered whether opting to buy in a charity shop was now the way forward.

I held up loads of winter jumpers, trousers, jeans, etc, yesterday to the shops' lights and you could see right through everything I held up. Some of the stuff on sale was so thin that I feared it would rip by just holding it.

The only jeans I found that were a decent thickness were Levis and I actually found myself considering paying 65 quid for a pair of jeans as I knew they would last. The stuff I looked at in Next, M&S amongst others was very thin.

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Oddly enough, after yesterday doing some clothes' shopping and concluding that much of the material out there is thinner than 2 or 3 year old worn material, I wondered whether opting to buy in a charity shop was now the way forward.

I held up loads of winter jumpers, trousers, jeans, etc, yesterday to the shops' lights and you could see right through everything I held up. Some of the stuff on sale was so thin that I feared it would rip by just holding it.

The only jeans I found that were a decent thickness were Levis and I actually found myself considering paying 65 quid for a pair of jeans as I knew they would last. The stuff I looked at in Next, M&S amongst others was very thin.

My jeans are secondhand now. Levi's from off the market.

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To be fair, a lot of modern clothing is lighter because buildings are warmer. In most modern buildings it's too hot to wear a 9oz wool jacket, let alone a 'bulletproof' Harris tweed from the 60s. If you look at old pics the men are always wearing tweeds, pullover etc indoors. Nowadays you would pass out if you did that.

,I think I do acknowledge that in my first paragraph with the crombie example. A sustained freeze up or energy crisis and people will be struggling in their lightweight modern clothing. B) However I think modern clothing is lighter in order to make it cheaper.

Edited by Sir John Steed

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Some of their stuff's not bad, although expensive for what it is.

For me, the problem with American Apparel is that I've never been comfortable with the way they market themselves.

They tried to take the Terry Richardson style of photography into the mainstream (for all I know he may actually do their campaigns), and I think it puts people off.

I think a lot of people feel the same way I do.

Their ass was the best thing about them. Sorry, I mean ads ;)

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  • 146 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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