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goldilocksporridge

Alternatives To 9 To 5 Grind/career Advice

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I need your help - I don't dislike my career and job that much but there is always that feeling that your fate is the hands of your bosses, and treading carefully is always the name of the game at work - asking for promotions or payrises, and with bosses leaving and changes you constantly having to prove yourself. Whilst I have done this now for 9 years - its feeling groundhog day sitting in an office seeing the same characters and BS etc - Everything is URGENT, constant job insecurity etc, the latest intrigue, the latest scandal - all at the end of the day for an average salary. Now I could cope with this if I had other financial options, and I think my motivation levels at work would Rocket with the security another source of income. At the moment it feels like I am hovering with no clear plan, or idea of where to go to.

I mean even if you get to the top in a corporate job at the end of the day its only salary that can be turned off. Read those books like rich dad poor dad, and liked the ideas of building up small businesses, and property, shares etc . But to date I have managed to get 2 buy to let properties which I just cover my costs on. Although they will pay off when the Mortgages are paid off.

1. Plod away at current level hope for a promotion, and save, and try to buy more property, and get a middle management job in a corporate place- and settle into a long career of meetings, status reports, sitting at a desk - I am not a great lover of these environments, and it shows, and you can only disguise your contempt for so long - therefore I can't see myself climbing that high - although I would like to, it just seem so difficult to get a promotion to decent job where you have a bit of clout, and influence, and you can make some decisions.

2. Continue what I am doing, but get a part job and save - unlikely to pay enough to make it worth while. Therefore some sort of part time business like a takeaway, on top of the 9 to 5 gig - I know it sounds mad - but I want to create as many options as possible to maxmise income.

3. Retrain in something - looked at possibly software development, or getting certification in Network exams like CISCO - but I just have the feeling I don't have the natural inclination to learn this type of thing, and then you need experience - the chances are slim, and might not earn that much more than my current role if your not pretty good at what you do. There is always a possibility to specialise in something different which might lead to a better job.

4. Take a course CEMAP Mortagage advisor exams, or Book Keeping, and try to work freelance, like a side job.

5. had a look at these peopleperhour.com and elance - now there is a possibility - Although have bidded for a few jobs but not won anything - plus a lot of them are pretty low paid, with very specific skills - therefore in my opinion not a realistic long term money earner.

So are there any other options, or ideas, or things you have done. I have mostly worked in corporate environments in software support, project management and planning - but its been one job to the next without a clear plan.

Plus most of the places I have worked - it seems to be your left at a desk, and its sink or swim mentality - little in the way of career advice or management.

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I ask myself similar things. Especially now! Don't even earn the mean average salary in the day job and after tax my takehome pay would probably be replaced easily by expanding sidelines but I still have that fear that somehow things would go wrong... but it's silly because I have to blow off freelance gigs at least a couple of times a month due to lack of time, energy or lack of daytime availability that would replace two thirds of the day job money! I have good contacts that could push me work but I don't exploit them due to lack of hours in the day.

I also have the small amount of money that 's generated from my savings pot. There's even the very modest amounts of occasional Adsense revenue.

So what I want is not a job but sufficient revenue streams to, initially, just get by.

I don't think I'd bother retraining in anything as my problem is I've always been overskilled for the work I've done. I need to monetize what I already know how to do.

I don't know why having a full time job - unless it's fantastically well-paid and incredibly interesting - is really considered secure. You have to pass up other opportunities to commit to 9 to 5 and it can all come crashing down if they decide to sack you one day.

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Take each idea and set some dates for it, some deadlines, so you can start to wash out the ones that don't suit you or wont work at this time. Just try them out one by one. Getting promoted at work? In the last two years I have not seen this happen, people always being recruited from outside. It seems the current trend in business thinking is that the staff will not respect anyone promoted internally. so if you want to move up, redefine your job title and move on.

I got within 8 people of my dream job this week, and I also know precisely why I didn't get it, this is good progress.

I am finding that I may not be well suited to freelancing, and I still had to work for a moron. The nice bit being I could just walk away, but I have zero income now.

You do need a very real idea of how greener the grass might be on the other side, it could give you renewed energy for your current situation.

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The key, for me, was to put work in it's place, understand that it's just somewhere to go to make some money, and so if you're in a relatively well paid job that you also detest, learn to frame those hours between 8 and 5 and live for everything outside of that.

The key is not to try and enjoy work, the key is to not allow your dislike for work to rule your life.

Of course, there are jobs out there that would probably be fulfilling and quite enjoyable, but none of them pay enough, and for me I'd rather carry on in a job that has it's moments, but is essentially dull and frustrating, in order to have the means and finances to enjoy my spare time more.

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The key, for me, was to put work in it's place, understand that it's just somewhere to go to make some money, and so if you're in a relatively well paid job that you also detest, learn to frame those hours between 8 and 5 and live for everything outside of that.

The key is not to try and enjoy work, the key is to not allow your dislike for work to rule your life.

Of course, there are jobs out there that would probably be fulfilling and quite enjoyable, but none of them pay enough, and for me I'd rather carry on in a job that has it's moments, but is essentially dull and frustrating, in order to have the means and finances to enjoy my spare time more.

That's what I used to do and I was happy with that when I things weren't cut to the bone at work and started to feel I could never get away as there was too much work. If you're truly wiped out come the end of the working day your interests, sidelines, hobbies all get squeezed and cease to become enjoyable. That's a danger sign. If you start losing your sense of calm and basic happiness it can get bad.

My company's had various layoffs over the last couple of years and I'm probably only there because I'm not big enough of a blip on the spreadsheet. There's been two years of pay freezes - although business is good and there's no shortgage of freelance work out there so how they've got away with this I don't know. I think demoralisation and stress is affecting people much more now, not just me. I feel more insecure being there than just effing off.

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That's what I used to do and I was happy with that when I things weren't cut to the bone at work and started to feel I could never get away as there was too much work. If you're truly wiped out come the end of the working day your interests, sidelines, hobbies all get squeezed and cease to become enjoyable. That's a danger sign. If you start losing your sense of calm and basic happiness it can get bad.

My company's had various layoffs over the last couple of years and I'm probably only there because I'm not big enough of a blip on the spreadsheet. There's been two years of pay freezes - although business is good and there's no shortgage of freelance work out there so how they've got away with this I don't know. I think demoralisation and stress is affecting people much more now, not just me. I feel more insecure being there than just effing off.

That's interesting. I have a friend who has now survived about ten rounds of redundancies (global mega corp) and it has done his head in. Every day waiting for the axe to fall. He actually wants redundancy as he has 15 years at the same company, so a weird situation, insecurity and frustration, plus overwork now.

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The key, for me, was to put work in it's place, understand that it's just somewhere to go to make some money, and so if you're in a relatively well paid job that you also detest, learn to frame those hours between 8 and 5 and live for everything outside of that.

The key is not to try and enjoy work, the key is to not allow your dislike for work to rule your life.

Of course, there are jobs out there that would probably be fulfilling and quite enjoyable, but none of them pay enough, and for me I'd rather carry on in a job that has it's moments, but is essentially dull and frustrating, in order to have the means and finances to enjoy my spare time more.

+1 on that. Things improved for me when I realised that all of my mental energy was going into my job, and promotion would only make it worse. Since then I've put work in its proper place - it's interesting enough but occupies strictly one third of my waking hours. I use another third on interests/hobbies, and the final third on family/friends. Much more balanced!

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Reads a bit like something I read in a book on frugal living - but the guy who wrote that wasn't some sleazy self-empowerment scammer.

Wow, clearly you reject life and have become a slave, licking the @ss of Gordon Brown. How is this guy sleazy and a scammer?

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The key, for me, was to put work in it's place, understand that it's just somewhere to go to make some money, and so if you're in a relatively well paid job that you also detest, learn to frame those hours between 8 and 5 and live for everything outside of that.

The key is not to try and enjoy work, the key is to not allow your dislike for work to rule your life.

Of course, there are jobs out there that would probably be fulfilling and quite enjoyable, but none of them pay enough, and for me I'd rather carry on in a job that has it's moments, but is essentially dull and frustrating, in order to have the means and finances to enjoy my spare time more.

I tried that but after a while it still wasn't enough. I'm happy to take less money - in fact i'll probably never get again what I was earning before I took voluntary redundancy from my previous job and I couldn't be happier.

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I worked for a company for quite a long time, and I declined promotion because my work was not the be all and end all of my life, quality of life and my life outside of work was far more important..more responsibility = more pressure and stress, I knew I was good at what I did so I was happy to train others teaching them all that I knew, I saw some that thought they knew it all but didn't have a clue...so I would say stick to your comfort zone, but only take on more when you are ready and you know the ropes...it doesn't take long for people to suss out the faker. ;)

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steve-pavlina-headshot.jpg

Would you leave your kids with this guy?

Depends what they had done!

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After doing a degree, i went into engineering, but found i couldn't stand office life. After trying a few different companies and finding little difference, I chucked it in and retrained as a tree surgeon - that was 15 years ago, and I've been self employed for 10 years, now as a forestry contractor. Of course, the income is a lot lower, and I missed the property boat as the only mortgage I could have taken on would have been a liar loan (I'd probably be regretting that now :unsure: )

I've enjoyed a lot of the work, but things seem to have been especially tight over the last few years. I worked out that last year's earning were equivalent to £4.50 per hour ! (In fact, I spend twice as much on my landlord as i do on myself.. :angry: )

No regrets, though, but I could have played it better. With hindsight, I'd have stuck it out a bit longer and ploughed everything into paying the mortgage off on 1 property. then I could have chucked the job in once housing costs were all but eliminated.

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steve-pavlina-headshot.jpg

Would you leave your kids with this guy?

lol, he looks.....American. That's all. A certain type, for sure.

I think you've been a bit harsh on him.

The guy is not originally a marketer. He is a guy whose total life passion is self development and it shows. His posts are amazing.

He even did an experiment with a type of sleeping where you only get four hours sleep a day but you must sleep four times a day or something. It is a valid way of sleeping that is not really compatible with modern living.

Anyway, his posts are really good. Only later does he plug stuff but the guy is 100% ethical and highly respected by his readers. He is not a hard selling type. He is not even a soft selling type.

Read his blog and your life will improve, it's as simple as that.

If you don't see that, I can really only assume that you are either extremely cynical or maybe disgruntled with life or something.

Scammer of sleazy? No way. Not this guy. Not in a million years.

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Well its not the money - well it is the money i suppose. You can spend years in these environments and have a savings pot which can disappear very quickly with spell of unemployment.

I just see lots of complacent people who works for years, and have nothing really to show for it. what happens when you get to your 55 and there are no decent jobs around, or no one wants you because you have too much experience, or worse still you get ill. Employers push people for the maximum, but begrudge them small payrises, with less jobs .

I don't want in 15 yrs time to be insecure about my job, and having not that much to show for a career.

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I know the feeling...

I'm annoyed because I've been invited to an interview tomorrow morning as a tax consultant, an area which I can easily cruise along in for a long period of time. Problem is the pay is not great £14K added to this a near triple mile figure for distance = about £2K in bike maintenance costs and fuel which won't be fun..

I was just about to press the button on the webpage to pay for a flight out of here then a phone call came out of the blue inviting me to an interview as some how some how they got a hold of my CV...

I'm going to go have a look tomorrow but will probably come back so much more confused...

I feel very much like Edward Lewis in Pretty woman.....i.e. I derive no satisfaction from accountancy or tax work at all, I do derive satisfaction from lower paid and more creative work though.

So when it was on yesterday on ITV2 or something via the laptop tuner thing I flicked to the bit where he was describing to his lawyer about bricks and how he liked them and his company never built anything.

I then wrote a bit more of AK47 society then went back to it and came to the scene where he changes his mind and decides to build ships with the old man...

All very confusing...

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I feel very much like Edward Lewis in Pretty woman.....i.e. I derive no satisfaction from accountancy or tax work at all, I do derive satisfaction from lower paid and more creative work though.

Pfffffffft!

Ken:

prettywoman1.jpg

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Interesting. It's always amazing to me how ingrained the Protestant work ethic is, many people wouldn't know how to fill the time between 9 and 5 if they weren't employed.

steve-pavlina-headshot.jpg

Would you leave your kids with this guy?

What a completely stupid and ignorant comment.

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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