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StainlessSteelCat

Bad News For B&q Employees

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I would agree.

I had a small job to do on my house (which I am trying to sell) on Friday and called in to our local B&Q three times - morning, afternoon and evening, and the car park was noticably empty each time with staff definately out numbering customers inside. This is big new store that opened around 3 years ago and I have never seen it this quiet before, it was very noticable.

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One of the Eastleigh/Southampton stores has just been refurbished to be more female friendly (more homemaking, less heavy DIY) and also doubled in size, but has to compete with two other B&Q stores, including a mega ‘depot’ style one, a couple of Wickes (the biggest of which, incidentally, looked like a mausoleum over the holiday weekend) and several Homebase ones.

Edited by spline

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One of the Eastleigh/Southampton stores has just been refurbished to be more female friendly (more homemaking, less heavy DIY) and also doubled in size, but has to compete with two other B&Q stores, including a mega ‘depot’ style one, a couple of Wickes (the biggest of which, incidentally, looked like a mausoleum over the holiday weekend) and several Homebase ones.

Out of interest wheres the huge one?

Only one I know is the near the holiday inn

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When a housing boom ends, the jobs that were created by the boom disappear.

So the story that can justify high house prices because of low unemployment is just rubbish. This is one of Kirstie's little maxims, and it stinks.

As we are seeing now, many jobs are starting to go, and this is only going to get worse over the next few years.

This will create a reverse wealth spiral, in the same way that rising house prices increased jobs, encouraged people to spend, and fed back into the economy.

Only it isn't so much fun when house prices go down, consumers shut down spending, and the jobs disappear.

Add to this mix the utter lack of saving in the country, and we're heading for some very tough years.

It's just part of the economic cycle.

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Out of interest wheres the huge one?

Only one I know is the near the holiday inn

I think I mean the ‘warehouse’ level store :) , Hedge End and Nursling. The ‘supercentre’ ones are really not worth bothering with (limited product range), but the new ‘mini-warehouse’ is an interesting new concept.

Slightly off-topic: I like Elliots for tools etc. - better range, but more expensive on standard things.

Warehouses:

Hedge End, SO30 4HW,

Nursling Industrial Estate, SO16 0YW

Supercentre:

Portswood, SO17 3SX, [rubbish]

Mini Warehouse:

Shakespeare Rd, Eastleigh, SO50 4SF [just refurbished, actually quite good]

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Add to this mix the utter lack of saving in the country, and we're heading for some very tough years.

The encouragement to get into debt that will linger on for years is the real scandal of all this. Those caught up in the hype will have years of misery ahead of them.

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One of the Eastleigh/Southampton stores has just been refurbished to be more female friendly (more homemaking, less heavy DIY) and also doubled in size, but has to compete with two other B&Q stores, including a mega ‘depot’ style one, a couple of Wickes (the biggest of which, incidentally, looked like a mausoleum over the holiday weekend) and several Homebase ones.

Interesting you should say that. My cousin's husband works indirectly for Wickes, and he happened to mention a fortnight back in an Email that the warehouse he works at will be going from 7-day/week to 5-day/week operations.

By the tone of his Email, he wasn't looking forward to telling his team. Some of them have come to absolutely rely on working extra shifts.

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B&Q HQ is in my catchment area. We've lost half the jobs at BAT, the railway works is closing and now 400 jobs from B&Q.

I feel like the city is plunging into an abysse but no ones noticed. I think they are about to. I remember the 80's recession, I suffered enormously. I think we are about to have it again and am not looking forward to it, bl***y dreading it actually!.

Edited by deano

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I'd have thought that if people were having to stay put, wouldn't they then spend time and money doing their house up as they'd get the benefit for the next few years....................................?

Or is it because they're all MEW'd and garden decked to the hilt now?

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I'd have thought that if people were having to stay put, wouldn't they then spend time and money doing their house up as they'd get the benefit for the next few years....................................?

Or is it because they're all MEW'd and garden decked to the hilt now?

Mortgages prevent people moving cheaply. In a recession you need the flexibillity to move to where the work is. The system will work against our interests, in effect it will stop us having an economic recovery of any significance.

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Mortgages prevent people moving cheaply.  In a recession you need the flexibillity to move to where the work is.  The system will work against our interests, in effect it will stop us having an economic recovery of any significance.

speaking purely from an HPC view is that a bad thing???

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I'd have thought that if people were having to stay put, wouldn't they then spend time and money doing their house up as they'd get the benefit for the next few years....................................?

Or is it because they're all MEW'd and garden decked to the hilt now?

The biggest sale of white goods, electronics and DIY goods happen when people move home. Hence the boom enjoyed by the likes of B&Q, Curry's et al.

The money has mostly been free. People have been keen to spend. Times have been good.

Trouble is that this boom has now finished, people aren't going to be replacing fridges/washing machines etc for quite some years.

Welcome to the world of actually working to make money (ie not getting paid for playing solitaire and answering the phone and driving your mini).

Some people are going to have a very tough time adjusting.

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I just ordered a new tumble dryer for £60 cheaper than Currys are selling it for. I asked if they wanted to do a price match, but they said the internet doesn't count.

Maybe people are doing a bit more shopping around rather than going straight to the High street for their shopping....? (though I doubt they'd be smart enough for that)

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There is a focus now in B&Q away from core DIY to homemaking - furniture and decorating, rugs, replacing the shower, that sort of thing.

libitina – yes, this price match thing is ridiculous; only within the catchment area of the store, anyone cheaper doesn’t count, same with the internet, and so on … the high street retailers just don’t get it – the problem is delivery, and everyone (including the internet) generally use the same people! Some stores even take the line – we have a fixed price and don’t negotiate; it’s quite funny to hold out a credit card and watch the sales man refuse it for even a small discount while pointing to the internet price you will reluctantly have pay ... :huh: These guys will be wiped out unless they can figure out some way of adding value.

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When a housing boom ends, the jobs that were created by the boom disappear.

So the story that can justify high house prices because of low unemployment is just rubbish. This is one of Kirstie's little maxims, and it stinks.

As we are seeing now, many jobs are starting to go, and this is only going to get worse over the next few years.

This will create a reverse wealth spiral, in the same way that rising house prices increased jobs, encouraged people to spend, and fed back into the economy.

Indeed, it's quite frightening, 3/4 of new jobs and the majority of GDP growth in the US over recent years has been due to the construction industry.

I'm sure the BoE and HM Tresury are well aware of this, they have much more detailed figures than us, they're obviously bricking it. GB is rather quiet of late, he did intervene in the Gate Gormet thing though... with high oil and bubbles in asset prices you can only have so much 70's nostalgia, crappy industry relations is probably a bit too surreal.

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Yes, of course – I’d forgotten about the credit lines and product breakdown insurance! But then I suppose that the internet retailers could eat into this as well ...

Edit: it's almost as though the product is just a thowaway to sell a loan!

Edited by spline

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Guest Bart of Darkness
I just ordered a new tumble dryer for £60 cheaper than Currys are selling it for. I asked if they wanted to do a price match, but they said the internet doesn't count.

Unless it costs you a sale of course.

Complacent sods.

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I wish I could find the post I wrote about 9 months back saying that when the likes of B+Q start to lay off then the HPC is well and truly happening.

I TOLD YOU SO!!!!!...

someone had better tell the piggies the fat lady is warming-up!

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Interesting facts about GMACs, General Motors finance arm. Been around since 1919 and makes more money than the "core" car industry.

http://www.gmacfs.com/aboutus/

Recently, GM seem to almost sell cars at cost price and just make money on the financing.

GM 2003

Indeed, without the finance arm GM would of made a loss recently, they're having to resort to using employee discounts to shift cars to the public.

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this is more serious than you think.

B&q depend on your average joe bloggs doing up there house, not on builders, infact builders find the place a nightmare.You go in for a bag of cement and it take an hour to get out.

b&q also aint cheapest, and another thing is they only deliver free to account holders, most builders merchants deliver free to whoever buys and especially regular customers.

So it makes sense to buy from a local merchants even for the householder.

B&Q goods are also of a poorer quality than a merchants will sell, there so big that quality has been effected, a smaller firm can keep a good check on this.

So as i said its the housholders and diyers that use B&Q

as an example i do guttering/fascias/soffits ect and i can buy the same quality goods even the same makes at half the price they are in B&Q and buy them local.

and have it delivered to my job if i wish.

Ive found focus and wickes have also much improved in the last couple years as well.

B&Q are gonna end up another m&s

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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