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5 Year Old Girl Passes Gcse In Maths

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Shock Horror Story:

5 Year Olds Passing Exams Without Any Student Debt To Banks

A five-year-old girl – Dee Alli from south London – is believed to have become the youngest child in Britain to score a GCSE after gaining a C in maths.

Seven-year-old Oscar Selby from Epsom, Surrey, scored an A* in the same subject – making him the youngest to score the top grade in a GCSE.

In all, around one-in-10 examinations in the core subjects of English and maths are now taking before children turn 16

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/7962580/GCSE-results-one-in-10-sitting-exams-early.html

Student loans must begin in kindergartens or pre-school, or bright kids will be scrounging 'til they're teenagers. Get them indebted to banks NOW. It's obvious once one or two start passing exams for free, they'll all be at it.

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In other news, Flouride levels increased in water supplies.

prevents tooth decay.

except it doesnt....Dentists are as in demand as they ever were.

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There are a lot of facets to this story. I find it hard to believe that the home life of a 5 year old, whose parents have entered here for a GCSE in maths, is going to be remotely normal or a healthy environement to grow up in, in terms of social development. Although, that said, perhaps avoidance of the indoctrination of the public school system might be an advantage.

GCSEs are supposed to be a marker of 'competence', and indicate that a 16 year old has reached a good standard in understanding the subject, such that they should be employable in a job that requires such knowledge. What does it suggest about the standard of 16 year olds, if a 5 year old can also achieve the same standard?

Perhaps this is why tooth decay is on the rise despite fluoridation - children are too ill-educated to know how to avoid rotting their teeth. Certainly in East London, it's not uncommon for 5 year olds to have such rotten teeth, that they're having surgery to remove every single tooth and be fitted with dentures because the teeth are so rotten that they can't be saved. Fluoridation or not - that's not normal. That wasn't even normal in Victorian times. It's simple ignorance, poor parenting and poor diet.

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GCSEs are supposed to be a marker of 'competence', and indicate that a 16 year old has reached a good standard in understanding the subject, such that they should be employable in a job that requires such knowledge. What does it suggest about the standard of 16 year olds, if a 5 year old can also achieve the same standard?

Disagree. Motivation is the key, and a motivated five-year-old can take in a lot. And maths at school level requires no learning beyond some basic terminology and notations: just a little bit of logical thinking answers everything from first principles.

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In all, around one-in-10 examinations in the core subjects of English and maths are now taking before children turn 16.

What, like anyone born in July or August would?

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GCSEs are supposed to be a marker of 'competence', and indicate that a 16 year old has reached a good standard in understanding the subject, such that they should be employable in a job that requires such knowledge. What does it suggest about the standard of 16 year olds, if a 5 year old can also achieve the same standard?

Most of the kids at my Secondary school took JMB O-Levels at the end of the 4th year;I did the Maths O-Level the month I turned 15 in 1971.(Hard going though,particularly as you had to pass three separate component exams to pass at all,and my Geometry was a bit weak.)I saw a modern Maths GCSE paper recently,and it was a joke;we were doing that stuff at age 12/13 !

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LITTLE Dee Alli has become the youngest person in Britain to get a GCSE - at FIVE.

Dee, who does not start primary school until next month, got grade C maths.

She said: "I didn't know I was taking the exam, I thought it was a game. Maths is a big game with numbers."

Dee was taught by a charity helping talented children in Southwark, South London. A boy of 12 scooped three science GCSEs at A*. Wajih Ahmed of Chandler's Ford, Hants, scored above 90 per cent in biology, chemistry and physics.

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Guest Absolutely Fabulous

There are a lot of facets to this story. I find it hard to believe that the home life of a 5 year old, whose parents have entered here for a GCSE in maths, is going to be remotely normal or a healthy environement to grow up in, in terms of social development. Although, that said, perhaps avoidance of the indoctrination of the public school system might be an advantage.

GCSEs are supposed to be a marker of 'competence', and indicate that a 16 year old has reached a good standard in understanding the subject, such that they should be employable in a job that requires such knowledge. What does it suggest about the standard of 16 year olds, if a 5 year old can also achieve the same standard?

Perhaps this is why tooth decay is on the rise despite fluoridation - children are too ill-educated to know how to avoid rotting their teeth. Certainly in East London, it's not uncommon for 5 year olds to have such rotten teeth, that they're having surgery to remove every single tooth and be fitted with dentures because the teeth are so rotten that they can't be saved. Fluoridation or not - that's not normal. That wasn't even normal in Victorian times. It's simple ignorance, poor parenting and poor diet.

My children were never left to their own devices as regards oral hygiene at that age. Do you think that most 5 year olds are?

My children - now aged 38 and 42 - have all their teeth and NO fillings, largely due to my standing over them morning and evening in childhood and supervising toothbrushing. They soon picked up this habit, as they did washing their hands after toileting etc.

Children have rotting tetth usually 'cos their parents aren't bothering to establish these habits in them.

Whilst I agree that educational 'markers' have been lowered over the decades, it is possible for a youngster to be a genius.

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It's nothing to do with toothbrushing , the real culprit is soft drinks.

I worked with a guy who drank 5-6 cans on energy drinks per day , these were big cans as well ; maybe 450mls each.

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It's nothing to do with toothbrushing , the real culprit is soft drinks.

I worked with a guy who drank 5-6 cans on energy drinks per day , these were big cans as well ; maybe 450mls each.

I'm not so sure about that, namely because soft drinks wash away so easily, though I did used to rinse my mouth out after a coke.

I think it is to do with sticky foods, bread for instance it gets turned into an emulisified paste in your mouth and gets squeezed into areas of your mouth and into your teeth which because it is a paste your spit doesn't remove like it does with dissolved sugars.

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Was a fluff piece on our local news last night about some Polish lad who could not speak a word of English five years ago who had just managed to get several GCSEs including an A, for Polish.

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My children were never left to their own devices as regards oral hygiene at that age. Do you think that most 5 year olds are?

My children - now aged 38 and 42 - have all their teeth and NO fillings, largely due to my standing over them morning and evening in childhood and supervising toothbrushing. They soon picked up this habit, as they did washing their hands after toileting etc.

Children have rotting tetth usually 'cos their parents aren't bothering to establish these habits in them.

Whilst I agree that educational 'markers' have been lowered over the decades, it is possible for a youngster to be a genius.

:lol: I don't know why but I think this is one of the funniest posts I've ever read on this site.

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My children were never left to their own devices as regards oral hygiene at that age. Do you think that most 5 year olds are?

My children - now aged 38 and 42 - have all their teeth and NO fillings, largely due to my standing over them morning and evening in childhood and supervising toothbrushing. They soon picked up this habit, as they did washing their hands after toileting etc.

Children have rotting tetth usually 'cos their parents aren't bothering to establish these habits in them.

Whilst I agree that educational 'markers' have been lowered over the decades, it is possible for a youngster to be a genius.

I think this is one of the most sensible posts I've ever read on this site, and I do know why.

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I think this is one of the most sensible posts I've ever read on this site, and I do know why.

Are you the 38 or the 42 year old? Nice gnashers by the way.

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Guest Absolutely Fabulous

I'm not so sure about that, namely because soft drinks wash away so easily, though I did used to rinse my mouth out after a coke.

I think it is to do with sticky foods, bread for instance it gets turned into an emulisified paste in your mouth and gets squeezed into areas of your mouth and into your teeth which because it is a paste your spit doesn't remove like it does with dissolved sugars.

Yes, as shown by the top teeth suffering more than the bottom ones, which are constantly 'bathed' in saliva passing through the 'floor' of the mouth.

Not allowing kids access to stacks of sugary foods helps too, not to mention regular visits to the dentist.

So many adults are scared of the dentist that it may well be a contributing factor, too.

As to fluoride. I think that it DOES help. I have always cleaned MY teeth twice a day - minimum - since early childhood and not eaten too many sweets in my time. Yet I have numerous fillings. when I asked the dental hygienist about this she said that fluoride has been a major factor in keeping teeth free from decay. Dunno about it being in the water, but it IS in toothpaste, so if you are too idle/stupid to clean your teeth - they will rot.ph34r.gif

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Guest Absolutely Fabulous

Are you the 38 or the 42 year old? Nice gnashers by the way.

Not unless he is double posting.tongue.gif

My son's user name is not Sledgehead - BTW thanks for the compliment! SH - and you'll rarely see him on the OT forum. He thinks that there are too many ******* on here.

PS my son does have fantastic gnashers - partly down to genes, partly down to good oral hygiene.biggrin.gif

He also looks about 10 years younger than his contemporaries, due to his face not being sunken in, due to extracted teeth.

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Not unless he is double posting.tongue.gif

My son's user name is not Sledgehead - BTW thanks for the compliment! SH - and you'll rarely see him on the OT forum. He thinks that there are too many ******* on here.

PS my son does have fantastic gnashers - partly down to genes, partly down to good oral hygiene.biggrin.gif

He also looks about 10 years younger than his contemporaries, due to his face not being sunken in, due to extracted teeth.

I wasn't being horrid by the way. It's just I had a vision of you, as an old lady (I know you aren't one yet), sitting at a bus stop catching up with an old friend. Telling how one son was an armed robber, the other a mass murderer, but they've got lovely teeth. And NO fillings.

Just tickled me.

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[/b]

Yes, as shown by the top teeth suffering more than the bottom ones, which are constantly 'bathed' in saliva passing through the 'floor' of the mouth.

Not allowing kids access to stacks of sugary foods helps too, not to mention regular visits to the dentist.

So many adults are scared of the dentist that it may well be a contributing factor, too.

As to fluoride. I think that it DOES help. I have always cleaned MY teeth twice a day  - minimum - since early childhood and not eaten too many sweets in my time. Yet I have numerous fillings. when I asked the dental hygienist about this she said that fluoride has been a major factor in keeping teeth free from decay. Dunno about it being in the water, but it IS in toothpaste, so if you are too idle/stupid to clean your teeth - they will rot.ph34r.gif

Actually stacks are better for your teeth than moderation. The bacteria are inhibited by excessive sugar in the style of Mr Creosote.

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My son's user name is not Sledgehead - BTW thanks for the compliment! SH - and you'll rarely see him on the OT forum. He thinks that there are too many ******* on here.

Women? [slinks off in shame...]

I agree about the teeth, by the way. I too have plenty of fillings despite regular brushing from an early age, as do most of my contemporaries. However I know many people in their twenties who have no fillings at all, and are amazed if you tell them that you've got fillings. I've heard that explained as being due to the advent of fluoridated toothpaste.

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Guest Absolutely Fabulous

Women? [slinks off in shame...]

I agree about the teeth, by the way. I too have plenty of fillings despite regular brushing from an early age, as do most of my contemporaries. However I know many people in their twenties who have no fillings at all, and are amazed if you tell them that you've got fillings. I've heard that explained as being due to the advent of fluoridated toothpaste.

You have the first letter correct.biggrin.gif

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Guest Absolutely Fabulous

Ah, Welshmen.

I think we both know the word he really used.wink.gif

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  • 141 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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