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guitarman001

Now They're On About Gcses!

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-11064110

I saw this on the news this morning... one girl said she cam into school on Saturdays to do extra work. Commendable, but I get the feeling this is all a bit much - I don't remember studying so long, I had a life at that age, learned to play the guitar and had great times with friends. What do you reckon?

P.S. I can't see OFF TOPIC anywhere in the forum list...... (?) Apologies, it's RIGHT AT THE BOTTOM of the main page!

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-11064110

I saw this on the news this morning... one girl said she cam into school on Saturdays to do extra work. Commendable, but I get the feeling this is all a bit much - I don't remember studying so long, I had a life at that age, learned to play the guitar and had great times with friends. What do you reckon?

P.S. I can't see OFF TOPIC anywhere in the forum list...... (?)

When I did my A-levels (Maths, Phys, Chem, Computers) my homework took me up to 10pm most evenings.

I still have a pathological hate for homework.

I'm not sure why kids today have to do extra schooling unless they're a bit thick. I was the last year to do old school O-levels and A-levels and they were graded differently, with only the top 10% getting A-Grade and so on, whereas now anyone can get an A-grade (well, A-star now, whatever the hell that is).

As a bit of fun I did a GCSE in Electronics the following year and couldn't believe how easy it was compared to O-levels. Short of answering in faeces using my left foot I don't think I could have got any less than a C-grade

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They don't have homework as such .. some extra work they can do online - going over what they've done in class.

My lad has just trundled off to school to get some results - he starts year 11 (5th form) in a week or two to finish them off.

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Well thank the stars you ain't Asian. You do normal school, then you go to after school classes till about 8-9pm. Both places you are given shed loads of homework.

Such that Children never play out they are doing homework or are at school. They get so much homework you see them in Mc'ds and such like attempting to finish it off. Saturday they get put into Saturday school and given more homework.

Sundays they get put into catch up classes...

It is very effective..... in producing corporate zombies and slaves.

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Well thank the stars you ain't Asian. You do normal school, then you go to after school classes till about 8-9pm. Both places you are given shed loads of homework.

Such that Children never play out they are doing homework or are at school. They get so much homework you see them in Mc'ds and such like attempting to finish it off. Saturday they get put into Saturday school and given more homework.

Sundays they get put into catch up classes...

It is very effective..... in producing corporate zombies and slaves.

all that work makes you very short and yellow.....a trait my BIL finds attractive in Women

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http://www.bbc.co.uk...cation-11064110

I saw this on the news this morning... one girl said she cam into school on Saturdays to do extra work. Commendable, but I get the feeling this is all a bit much - I don't remember studying so long, I had a life at that age, learned to play the guitar and had great times with friends. What do you reckon?

P.S. I can't see OFF TOPIC anywhere in the forum list...... (?) Apologies, it's RIGHT AT THE BOTTOM of the main page!

Nahh they have it easy, we worked harder (but nowhere near as hard as I worked in the final year of uni)

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I couldn't believe what Sky were reporting about 'reaching to exam'. That they focus only on an excerpt of the text (in this case Macbeth) and don't bother to read the whole thing. That is insane. You may get an A* in English but you will still be thick.

Thanks for devaluing my education! I worked hard for that!

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-11064110

I saw this on the news this morning... one girl said she cam into school on Saturdays to do extra work. Commendable, but I get the feeling this is all a bit much - I don't remember studying so long, I had a life at that age, learned to play the guitar and had great times with friends. What do you reckon?

P.S. I can't see OFF TOPIC anywhere in the forum list...... (?) Apologies, it's RIGHT AT THE BOTTOM of the main page!

Isn't it the endless coursework that takes so long?

Quote from today's Times, from an (independent) head who's gone to IGCSEs instead:

'We found that GCSE maths had very, very tedious coursework. It didn't test mathematical acumen at all. Boys found it suicidally dull.'

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Are A*'s the new A's ?

Does that mean everyone with A's got B's ?

:lol::lol::lol::lol:

It's daft isn't it? The government loves a bit of inflation in exam grades too, it seems. In the same way that inflating the money supply doesn't make us any richer, inflating the exam grades doesn't make us any more intelligent either.

http://safle.org/wordpress/2007/08/07/a-level-grade-inflation-in-the-uk.html

Since 1982 the A level pass rate has risen every single year, and whereas only 68.2% of candidates passed in 1982 (grades A to E), the pass rate was 96.2% in 2005, and we are moving ever closer to 100% – if you sit the exam, you pass it.

There are some good charts in that link too.

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You know it's a fantastic way to phase out public funded education, by making it irrelevant.

Like most of the people undertaking it.

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Every year it's the same bloody thing: it is so obvious that grade inflation is rife in education.

The real problem is not grade inflation, it's whether the children are actually taught useful things.

The purpose of grades is just to let employers and universities try and distinguish relative levels of performance. The purpose of education is much greater.

If children are only taught things that are too easy or the wrong subjects, they will not succeed in the world, which means we as a country will not succeed. Those being schooled now will be the surgeons who operate on you in your old age. If their science teaching at age 11 is deficient, they will never go on to be the doctors or whatever else that we all need.

If I had my way we would be seeing far more lessons in practical skills (money, electrical, plumbing) and 21st century skills (chinese language, farming, sustainable living)

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The real problem is not grade inflation, it's whether the children are actually taught useful things.

The purpose of grades is just to let employers and universities try and distinguish relative levels of performance. The purpose of education is much greater.

If children are only taught things that are too easy or the wrong subjects, they will not succeed in the world, which means we as a country will not succeed. Those being schooled now will be the surgeons who operate on you in your old age. If their science teaching at age 11 is deficient, they will never go on to be the doctors or whatever else that we all need.

If I had my way we would be seeing far more lessons in practical skills (money, electrical, plumbing) and 21st century skills (chinese language, farming, sustainable living)

True. The syllabus must be shrinking , and/or focusing on the wrong topics ... :(

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The real problem is not grade inflation, it's whether the children are actually taught useful things.

The purpose of grades is just to let employers and universities try and distinguish relative levels of performance. The purpose of education is much greater.

If children are only taught things that are too easy or the wrong subjects, they will not succeed in the world, which means we as a country will not succeed. Those being schooled now will be the surgeons who operate on you in your old age. If their science teaching at age 11 is deficient, they will never go on to be the doctors or whatever else that we all need.

If I had my way we would be seeing far more lessons in practical skills (money, electrical, plumbing) and 21st century skills (chinese language, farming, sustainable living)

Well that is what I found deeply shocking about the teaching to exam, where they only study an excerpt from the book. How is this person going to understands concepts as a whole? Will they go through life picking just the bit they want to read and base decisions on that? You know, it seems nowadays people do..

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The real problem is not grade inflation, it's whether the children are actually taught useful things.

The purpose of grades is just to let employers and universities try and distinguish relative levels of performance. The purpose of education is much greater.

If children are only taught things that are too easy or the wrong subjects, they will not succeed in the world, which means we as a country will not succeed. Those being schooled now will be the surgeons who operate on you in your old age. If their science teaching at age 11 is deficient, they will never go on to be the doctors or whatever else that we all need.

If I had my way we would be seeing far more lessons in practical skills (money, electrical, plumbing) and 21st century skills (chinese language, farming, sustainable living)

In my day, your grades depended on how fast/well you could write copy text from reference books or the blackboard. The capacity to think never came into it, only what you could remember.

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In my day, your grades depended on how fast/well you could write copy text from reference books or the blackboard. The capacity to think never came into it, only what you could remember.

Not how I was taught. Beginning to really love my old grammar school.

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Well let's hope they all get the grades that they worked so hard for , then they can go on and do another two years for their "A" levels. If they work hard enough in those and acheive more record grades , they can then wander off to uni another 3 years racking up some debt throw in a nice gap year ( more debt ) but great experience so we are told. So that will take them to 22, piled up with debt, and no or very little work experience.

And then ..............oh that's when the problems start there are no jobs .Jobs we used to get at 16 , will require a degree and then there will be 100's in the queue for each one. Sorry to sound so glum , but reguardless of how good their qualifications and experience they have very little future.

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Every year I see the 'record number of passes' headlines and think i should test how hard these exams are by enrolling for a GCSE course. There must be loads of courses with multi-choice exams - All i have to do is find some way of getting my dog to give me a response A-D for a number of events, then enter his responses into a multiple choice exam paper.

I reckon he's bound to get a pass!

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The consensus from all of the teachers I know (which is a lot) is that they teach children to pass exams.

Back when I were a lad, we were taught maths. We were examined and if we were good at maths we got a good grade.

Now, you are taught to pass a maths exam, and if you are good at learning how to pass an exam, you will get a good grade.

What we have ended up with is a system where pupils who are talented at passing exams get good grades, whereas we previously had a system where passes were more directly related to a pupil's ability in a subject.

Every year, this 'teaching to pass exams' is getting more finely tuned and focussed, and it's that which is providing the basis for better and better results overall.

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The consensus from all of the teachers I know (which is a lot) is that they teach children to pass exams.

Back when I were a lad, we were taught maths. We were examined and if we were good at maths we got a good grade.

Now, you are taught to pass a maths exam, and if you are good at learning how to pass an exam, you will get a good grade.

What we have ended up with is a system where pupils who are talented at passing exams get good grades, whereas we previously had a system where passes were more directly related to a pupil's ability in a subject.

Every year, this 'teaching to pass exams' is getting more finely tuned and focussed, and it's that which is providing the basis for better and better results overall.

+1

The better results is no surprise at all. If you measure (and reward) something, with the objective of getting more of what you measure, its no shock to get what you asked for.

Nowadays a 'good' teacher gets the kids through exams. (After all the political doctrine is that this is what you're paying taxes for - right?) In the past 'good' teachers enthused pupils and taught them how to think about their subject. In the 80's some consultant fool suggested the former was better, and some politician fool decided to create league tables, and bad-mouth the teachers who wasted time enthusing children rather than cramming them through exams. Then in 1997 more damn fool politicians came along and did more of the same.

I doubt there are many teachers left who remember the old ways of doing it. The education mafias on all sides have ensured it has gone for good by measuring the price but not the value of teaching. If we don't like to see more kids passing exams each year we should scrap the league tables that encourage this as the main measure of a school and its teachers.

Its not right to denigrate the kids achievement . They are doing what is asked of them.

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Not how I was taught. Beginning to really love my old grammar school.

Unfortunately the socialists closed all of ours up here decades ago.

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If you view exams like quality control, the purpose is to feedback weaknesses in the process not just to pass a fixed notion of the quality control. Knowledge of the weaknesses is useful but not knowledge of the tests. I used to have one particular production supervisor who also didn't understand this, he used to complain when quality control rejected his production batch based on sampling tests he wasn't doing, he said this 'wasn't fair'.

My recommendations; ban any teaching/testing of past papers, concentrate on the entire syllabus. Regular testing identifies weaknesses, no final exam. Repeat until graduate subject individually. When you graduate a subject you do so with a minimum standard.

Perhaps we do need some level of elitism for special jobs, but I have to say that as an employer I have never paid any attention to 'grades' other that what you might call a pass/fail level. Also my personal experience was that I was perfectly capable of doing the jobs that required higher pass grades than I had (eg Engineering design), the guys that did those jobs just had a narrower field of focus, but I often found their theory to be lacking or blatantly wrong in some areas. In the end I found my wider field of focus to be more rewarding.

Edit to add - Perhaps the quality control needs to focus more on the teacher than the pupil.

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  • 261 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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