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The Masked Tulip

Adjusting Gears On Mountain Bike

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I was going up a steep hill today in first and my gears jumped out - the chain went over into the gap between the rear wheel and sprockets and broke a plastic guard.

I foolishly got home and began fiddling around with the two limit stops by loosening them and tightening them but I can't seem to get things quite right.

Nothing is bent or broken on the gears so it appears that I just need to adjust but I think I am missing fundamental so anby tips would be welcome. Should I have the chain in a certain gear or on a certain gear-wheel when doing this?

I had a good read of this site but it, whilst it is very good at explaining things, it doesn't really offer advice on how to get things balanced again.

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html

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If it were me I'd just pop it into Halfords and get it adjusted.

The last time I needed something done they did it for free.

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If it were me I'd just pop it into Halfords and get it adjusted.

I really wouldn't

A real bike shop, OK, but the bike "mechanics" in Halfords often know nothing. I've seen some really dangerous/damaged results of their attentions. To the extent that I'd always thoroughly check any bike that had been near them, and if I wasn't confident I'd get someone who was to.

kinesin's advice is good; it's a simple adjustment.

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Fair enough.

All I'm saying is Halfords did a good job on mine and didn't even charge me.

Your local Halfords may be very different ;)

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Fair enough.

All I'm saying is Halfords did a good job on mine and didn't even charge me.

Your local Halfords may be very different ;)

Halfords is pure pot-luck. You may get an assistant who happens to be competent: I knew one such who worked there part-time to help fund his PhD. But there's no expectation of that, and there are horror stories of them assembling bikes dangerously wrongly.

The advantage of a proper LBS (Local Bike Shop) is that it's run by someone who is actually motivated by cycling.

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I was mountain biking in Afan Forest Park last weekend. I enjoyed it immensely, even if I did fear for my life at one point. Can't help you with the bike though. The guys at the bike hire place did all the tinkering.

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There are some good videos on the web on how to adjust the gears on a MTB.

A very basic overview is to put the gears on the middle ring on the chain rings and cassette then first adjust the front derailleur top and bottom stops (the little screws ) until there is about 5mm to 10mm of clearance between the guide on derailleur and the edge of the chain.

Drop into the granny ring and adjust the tension in the cable until the chain changes freely from top to bottom, this is done with the adjuster at the handle bar, then pretty much repeat for the rear derailleur except the tension adjustment is on the derailleur not shifter and the stop adjustment is for the chain pooping off .

And check your cables poor shifting and other problems can mostly be traced back to crappy cables. If the bike is a few years old change the outer too. A clarks kit from halfords either gear or brakes will do a whole bikes outer cables if you have cable brakes.

Top tip, use a lighter to heat up the cable before it's cut...works a treat

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There are some good videos on the web on how to adjust the gears on a MTB.

A very basic overview is to put the gears on the middle ring on the chain rings and cassette then first adjust the front derailleur top and bottom stops (the little screws ) until there is about 5mm to 10mm of clearance between the guide on derailleur and the edge of the chain.

Drop into the granny ring and adjust the tension in the cable until the chain changes freely from top to bottom, this is done with the adjuster at the handle bar, then pretty much repeat for the rear derailleur except the tension adjustment is on the derailleur not shifter and the stop adjustment is for the chain pooping off .

And check your cables poor shifting and other problems can mostly be traced back to crappy cables. If the bike is a few years old change the outer too. A clarks kit from halfords either gear or brakes will do a whole bikes outer cables if you have cable brakes.

Top tip, use a lighter to heat up the cable before it's cut...works a treat

When I start taking my bike to bits I always take a few pics beforehand. This way when I'm wondering what goes where (which always happens) I can check the pic.

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There are some good videos on the web on how to adjust the gears on a MTB.

A very basic overview is to put the gears on the middle ring on the chain rings and cassette then first adjust the front derailleur top and bottom stops (the little screws ) until there is about 5mm to 10mm of clearance between the guide on derailleur and the edge of the chain.

Drop into the granny ring and adjust the tension in the cable until the chain changes freely from top to bottom, this is done with the adjuster at the handle bar, then pretty much repeat for the rear derailleur except the tension adjustment is on the derailleur not shifter and the stop adjustment is for the chain pooping off .

And check your cables poor shifting and other problems can mostly be traced back to crappy cables. If the bike is a few years old change the outer too. A clarks kit from halfords either gear or brakes will do a whole bikes outer cables if you have cable brakes.

Top tip, use a lighter to heat up the cable before it's cut...works a treat

Thanks.

What is the cassette? What is the granny ring? I can't believe I asked that last question!

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Thanks.

What is the cassette? What is the granny ring? I can't believe I asked that last question!

Granny ring is the ring that a granny would use to go up a hill aka the ring closest to the bottom bracket.

Cassette is the cluster of cogs attached to the rear wheel.

If you want to pop up to Blackwood I'll have a look for you B)

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Granny ring is the ring that a granny would use to go up a hill aka the ring closest to the bottom bracket.

Cassette is the cluster of cogs attached to the rear wheel.

If you want to pop up to Blackwood I'll have a look for you B)

I would pop up, but my bike is a tad fecked at the moment... so, this bracket you are talking about.... in other words the granny ring is the smallest ring/cog on the cassette?

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  • 152 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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