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Have a few Euro and decided to change it to sterling today. It's about 750 Euro - the lass refused to change it because it was a "very large sum of money" and I had no photo Id.

I don't think it's an unusually large amount of money (silly miscalculation with holiday spends) but I'd be interested to know what does pass for a normal amount. At what point would they start requesting Id and what does it say about attitudes towards people holding cash?

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Have a few Euro and decided to change it to sterling today. It's about 750 Euro - the lass refused to change it because it was a "very large sum of money" and I had no photo Id.

I don't think it's an unusually large amount of money (silly miscalculation with holiday spends) but I'd be interested to know what does pass for a normal amount. At what point would they start requesting Id and what does it say about attitudes towards people holding cash?

How exactly would photo ID help them decide whether to give you the money?

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Ludicrous. A 'large' amount is over €5k in my experience. Maybe they were €100 notes? Too many fakes out there and even shops and banks may refuse them.

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On the till receipt they write your passport number for ID

Does it get collected on a database somewhere? I'm intrigued. Somebody holding £600 in cash would be pretty normal I'd have thought. Haven't TPTB got more to worry about?

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i know that if you are transfering money to a off shore account using one of the money transfer companies and its more than one or two thousand they need proof of where it has come from. I transfered 2k to an account in the philippines and had to show them my ISA account showing a regular transfer of money into it and the 2k that came out. they took photo copies, but must have lost them because 4 months later they contacted me asking for proof again that the money wasnt laundered or gotten by ill means

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I like it when banks ask you where the money has come from when paying in more than a few hundred pounds. Say it's drugs money and watch their faces. They don't know what to do! :lol:

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Tell them you got a loan from their lending division on a ridiculously low rate, and that you are investing it at a higher rate to make money out of them. Like they are out of us from the money they get at 0.5%. :angry:

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Ah yes, I see now. Collecting payment in Euro on the mean streets of the peak district.

The owners of the Hope Valley council house cannabis factories are increasingly taking payment in € as they fear a collapse of the £. Cannabis now grows wild in the peaks.

If only they were taking people on at the cement factory.

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The owners of the Hope Valley council house cannabis factories are increasingly taking payment in € as they fear a collapse of the £. Cannabis now grows wild in the peaks.

If only they were taking people on at the cement factory.

misinformed, stoney middleton is where "the farms" r :lol:

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When I buy USDs in cash from the Bureau de Change at my local Tesco, not only do they insist on ID but they will only accept a passport or driving licence.

I very rarely carry much cash around with me, but one of the exceptions is during the Christmas / New Year period when ATMs tend to run out and credit card payment systems get shut down for maintenance, sometimes resulting in my card being rejected. At the end of one such period I had around £100 in cash left afterwards, some of which I attempted to use to buy a replacement for a failed external portable hard drive from Dixons. When I handed over the cash, the girl asked me for my name, address and photo ID, to which I replied 'With respect, none of your business'. She said that she couldn't print a receipt without the information being entered onto their system, to which I replied that she'd better find a way of doing so if she wanted to make the sale. Eventually she called her supervisor, who told me that it was the company's policy not to sell anything costing over £50 in cash without taking a name and address and checking ID, in order to prevent fraud. I told her that I regarded that as unacceptable, and that I'd be buying a hard drive somewhere else. The manager looked very surprised, and then suddenly whipped out a small digital camera from her jacket pocket and took a picture of me. I told her that I regarded that as harassment and would be writing to her head office (I later did so and never received any reply). I have never bought anything from Dixons (or PC World, which is the same company under another name) since, and will never do so.

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When I buy USDs in cash from the Bureau de Change at my local Tesco, not only do they insist on ID but they will only accept a passport or driving licence.

I very rarely carry much cash around with me, but one of the exceptions is during the Christmas / New Year period when ATMs tend to run out and credit card payment systems get shut down for maintenance, sometimes resulting in my card being rejected. At the end of one such period I had around £100 in cash left afterwards, some of which I attempted to use to buy a replacement for a failed external portable hard drive from Dixons. When I handed over the cash, the girl asked me for my name, address and photo ID, to which I replied 'With respect, none of your business'. She said that she couldn't print a receipt without the information being entered onto their system, to which I replied that she'd better find a way of doing so if she wanted to make the sale. Eventually she called her supervisor, who told me that it was the company's policy not to sell anything costing over £50 in cash without taking a name and address and checking ID, in order to prevent fraud. I told her that I regarded that as unacceptable, and that I'd be buying a hard drive somewhere else. The manager looked very surprised, and then suddenly whipped out a small digital camera from her jacket pocket and took a picture of me. I told her that I regarded that as harassment and would be writing to her head office (I later did so and never received any reply). I have never bought anything from Dixons (or PC World, which is the same company under another name) since, and will never do so.

thats ******

no,

thats utter bboloxx

Edited by Zngland

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The owners of the Hope Valley council house cannabis factories are increasingly taking payment in € as they fear a collapse of the £. Cannabis now grows wild in the peaks.

If only they were taking people on at the cement factory.

That's the problem with dope, it can make you a little paranoid. :ph34r::blink::blink:

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Well I buy Euros regularly on the internet from Crown Currency Exchange. You pay by BACS or send a cheque but there are no id checks. Min £300, £1000, no problem. Only if you want to buy over £10k worth in any 12 month period, which are the regulations I think. Then you have to sign a T&C and provide proof of a name and address.

Selling foreign currency to buy £ may be different though but I can't see why. Many shops now accept € as payment too, even up here in the Midlands.

Shops often want a name and address (Maplins were bu**ers for it) so thay can send you loads of spam and sell your details on. It's not a rule, that's rubbish.

Edited by deflation

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Well I buy Euros regularly on the internet from Crown Currency Exchange. You pay by BACS or send a cheque but there are no id checks.

The ID check (specifically, the recording of the ID of the person who buys the currency) is done by the bank when you open the account from which you pay for the euros. Were you to try to buy the euros in sterling cash from a high street travel agent, you would probably be required to provide photo ID.

Shops often want a name and address (Maplins were bu**ers for it) so thay can send you loads of spam and sell your details on. It's not a rule, that's rubbish.

It is their internal rule (i.e. their company's policy). I agree that the real reason probably has sod all to do with fraud prevention and everything to do with filling their databases up with information about consumer buying habits to be used for marketing purposes, though. Interestingly, I can't remember ever being asked for a name and address at Maplins, though I've only ever bought relatively cheap bits and pieces there.

Edited by The Ayatollah Buggeri

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When I buy USDs in cash from the Bureau de Change at my local Tesco, not only do they insist on ID but they will only accept a passport or driving licence.

I very rarely carry much cash around with me, but one of the exceptions is during the Christmas / New Year period when ATMs tend to run out and credit card payment systems get shut down for maintenance, sometimes resulting in my card being rejected. At the end of one such period I had around £100 in cash left afterwards, some of which I attempted to use to buy a replacement for a failed external portable hard drive from Dixons. When I handed over the cash, the girl asked me for my name, address and photo ID, to which I replied 'With respect, none of your business'. She said that she couldn't print a receipt without the information being entered onto their system, to which I replied that she'd better find a way of doing so if she wanted to make the sale. Eventually she called her supervisor, who told me that it was the company's policy not to sell anything costing over £50 in cash without taking a name and address and checking ID, in order to prevent fraud. I told her that I regarded that as unacceptable, and that I'd be buying a hard drive somewhere else. The manager looked very surprised, and then suddenly whipped out a small digital camera from her jacket pocket and took a picture of me. I told her that I regarded that as harassment and would be writing to her head office (I later did so and never received any reply). I have never bought anything from Dixons (or PC World, which is the same company under another name) since, and will never do so.

Wow.... that's outrageous!

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Does it get collected on a database somewhere? I'm intrigued. Somebody holding £600 in cash would be pretty normal I'd have thought. Haven't TPTB got more to worry about?

The information will be entered incorrectly or lost at some point, there's really nothing to be concerned about. There isn't enough competence throughout all the layers of officialdom to do anything sinister with anyones details even if they wanted to.

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When I buy USDs in cash from the Bureau de Change at my local Tesco, not only do they insist on ID but they will only accept a passport or driving licence.

I have often changed large amounts of sterling for us dollars or euros at Tesco and never once got asked for id , not even my postcode which the likes of Coop Travel always insist on having.

I find tescos the least intrusive of all bureau de changes i've visited.

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thats crazy , it beggars belief what is considered to be a large amount of cash , In japan I could go to a random ATM and take out the equivalent of 5,000 pounds , and spending it nobody would raise an eyebrow over using that amount of cash, in Singapore you can go into lucky plaza and change a million dollars into any number of other currency for cash with nobody asking any questions and for a tiny spread .. even 100 quid you can change into another ccy and back again and still have 99 quid , try this at heathrow and you will be lucky to end up with 70 , it always staggers me what a scam the booths are in the UK and for them to want ID I guess its because the details of the idiot that uses them must be worth a lot ...

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thats crazy , it beggars belief what is considered to be a large amount of cash , In japan I could go to a random ATM and take out the equivalent of 5,000 pounds , and spending it nobody would raise an eyebrow over using that amount of cash, in Singapore you can go into lucky plaza and change a million dollars into any number of other currency for cash with nobody asking any questions and for a tiny spread .. even 100 quid you can change into another ccy and back again and still have 99 quid , try this at heathrow and you will be lucky to end up with 70 , it always staggers me what a scam the booths are in the UK and for them to want ID I guess its because the details of the idiot that uses them must be worth a lot ...

Ah but in the freedom loving UK it's all for our own good ... to protect us from the terrorists and drug dealers and probably pedos too, somehow.

The attitude towards cash in Britain is disturbing. It's as if holding large amounts of cash - your OWN money - is criminal in and of itself. The banks of course want you to give your money to them in return for their credit notes so it's not too hard to guess where a lot of lobbying for the criminalisation of cash is coming from. Even if you do have your money in the banking system there are many restrictions on what you can do with it. Try transacting more than £10k without doing it face to face with a bank rep, with photo ID and having to tell them the reason why you want to do it, for example. Even better, try liquidating a large balance (10s of k)into cash and see what happens.

Ultimately the goal will be to eliminate cash and make everyone hold bank credit. The general population is too thick/ignorant to realise the implications (both in terms of financial and personal freedom) and probably will be only too happy to go along with it when explained how it's "for the good of the children" or some such B.S.

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Eventually she called her supervisor, who told me that it was the company's policy not to sell anything costing over £50 in cash without taking a name and address and checking ID, in order to prevent fraud. I told her that I regarded that as unacceptable, and that I'd be buying a hard drive somewhere else. The manager looked very surprised, and then suddenly whipped out a small digital camera from her jacket pocket and took a picture of me. I told her that I regarded that as harassment and would be writing to her head office (I later did so and never received any reply). I have never bought anything from Dixons (or PC World, which is the same company under another name) since, and will never do so.

Why?

Why not just give your name and address, buy whatever it is and go home?

You were only paying in cash as you happened to have some lying around: I guess normally you'd pay by card in which case Big Brother could easily link you to this purchase, so what's the difference?

I'm appalled that the manager photographed you, but I'm also baffled why you didn't just give them your ID.

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I have often changed large amounts of sterling for us dollars or euros at Tesco and never once got asked for id , not even my postcode which the likes of Coop Travel always insist on having.

I find tescos the least intrusive of all bureau de changes i've visited.

I've also used my local Sainsburys in the past to buy hundreds of €. They ask for name and address but NOT proof if id. So, if you're inclined. you could just give a fake name.

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The attitude towards cash in Britain is disturbing. It's as if holding large amounts of cash - your OWN money - is criminal in and of itself.

But you've got to admit walzing around with thousands of pounds in cash is pretty suspicious.

It isn't a criminal offence to dress in a black balaclava and skulk around street corners at 3am either - but if you did so, you surely couldn't blame the police for taking an interest.

Ultimately the goal will be to eliminate cash and make everyone hold bank credit. The general population is too thick/ignorant to realise the implications (both in terms of financial and personal freedom) and probably will be only too happy to go along with it when explained how it's "for the good of the children" or some such B.S.

You can't eliminate cash if people want it. You can cease circulating official cash, but people will just barter or use their own alteratives.

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  • 238 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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