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Benefits And Social Injustice.

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Andy Smith has just lost his job as a mechanic after working at Les Smith Motors because trade has dropped off and his boss can no longer afford to keep him on. He has been married for twelve years, worked all his life, and has an eleven year old son and ten year old daughter. His wife works part time on the check out in Asda and gets £120 a week take home pay. They live in a two bed council flat. Andy goes to the Jobcentre and is told that because his wife is earning more than what he would get on Jobseekers Allowance he isn't entitled to anything - he is supposed to live off his wif'e's income.

Jeremy Littlejohn has just had his A level results - they are cr*p (he spent all his 'study' time playing Call of Duty on his XBox) so he can't get a place in uni. His dad is a solicitor and his mum has worked for Barclays for twenty eight years. Yes, they live in a big four bed detached in the posh part of town and they have just come back from the family holiday in The Maldives. Jeremy goes into the Jobcentre sporting a nice tan the day after he gets back and has no problem signing on.

Yes, I know about Housing Benefit , Child Benefit etc for low incomes, but can't help but think there is something of a social injustice here (not a true case but the scenarios occurs daily).

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Unfortunately he only worked there for eighteen months; he was on unemployed for six months before landing the job so he doesn't qualify for Contribution Based JSA 9I exaggerated 'working all his life!).

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Bob, a one legged unicorn from the planet zaphiron, has 3 space children and has wrked down a dlithium mine for 150 years, doubel shifts. he has large watery eyes and is ever so adorable.

Arthur, a blob from omnicron persei 15 is really ugly and comes from a family of super rich blobs. He's been a complete failure all his blobby life, and shows no signs of growing a backbone.

Which one of them should be entitled to steal your money?

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Because he has children (especially older ones of different genders), Andy is entitled to a lot of support from the state over and above JSA. He could probably stay at home for many years in relative comfort if that's what he wants.

Meanwhile Jeremy, as a single person under 25, is entitled to £52 a week JSA and that's it. He faces the worst job market in decades with youth unemployment rates of 20-30% and unpaid internships or diving back into the system for unnecessary education (funded by debt) becoming increasingly the norm. Like many people his age, he will either stay in the family home indefinitely or move into a series of unstable shared house arrangements paying 40-50% of his take home pay in rent with little prospect of moving up the ladder for ten years or more. His chances of securing stable employment and housing are low.

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Andy Smith has just lost his job as a mechanic after working at Les Smith Motors because trade has dropped off and his boss can no longer afford to keep him on. He has been married for twelve years, worked all his life, and has an eleven year old son and ten year old daughter. His wife works part time on the check out in Asda and gets £120 a week take home pay. They live in a two bed council flat. Andy goes to the Jobcentre and is told that because his wife is earning more than what he would get on Jobseekers Allowance he isn't entitled to anything - he is supposed to live off his wif'e's income.

Jeremy Littlejohn has just had his A level results - they are cr*p (he spent all his 'study' time playing Call of Duty on his XBox) so he can't get a place in uni. His dad is a solicitor and his mum has worked for Barclays for twenty eight years. Yes, they live in a big four bed detached in the posh part of town and they have just come back from the family holiday in The Maldives. Jeremy goes into the Jobcentre sporting a nice tan the day after he gets back and has no problem signing on.

Yes, I know about Housing Benefit , Child Benefit etc for low incomes, but can't help but think there is something of a social injustice here (not a true case but the scenarios occurs daily).

If I were Andy Smith I'd see if I could move in with the Littlejohns. Sounds like a good life.

Should follow my example and stay single and not have children. Mugs game if you ask me getting married and having children. Too much to lose. Besides there are plenty of unattached women about who are happy to sniff around if they know you've got a bit of cash. ;)

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Well the daily mail answer =

Exploit the benefits system, it is their best choice!

a) split up,

B) she gets working family tax credits

c) He gets re-housed

d) Wait 6 months move back in and rent out the room/flat the council gave him to an illegal

e) If you get rumbled...Worry about your 100 hours community service (That you will have to fit around child care)

When the judge hands it out!

f) In the mean time post on have your say forum about the menace of single mothers from the local free wifi.

Anyone brave enough to suggest an better alternative (Proviso work in the are be thin on the ground)? Although putting him name on the birth certificate was probably a bad move.

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Meanwhile Jeremy, as a single person under 25, is entitled to £52 a week JSA and that's it. He faces the worst job market in decades with youth unemployment rates of 20-30% and unpaid internships or diving back into the system for unnecessary education (funded by debt) becoming increasingly the norm. Like many people his age, he will either stay in the family home indefinitely or move into a series of unstable shared house arrangements paying 40-50% of his take home pay in rent with little prospect of moving up the ladder for ten years or more. His chances of securing stable employment and housing are low.

Yes, poor thing. Not his fault he's a shiftless git. Still, looking on the bright side, his mum and dad will snuff it one day and he'll cop for the lot - after all, it's what he really deserves after all his struggle through life!

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Yes, poor thing. Not his fault he's a shiftless git. Still, looking on the bright side, his mum and dad will snuff it one day and he'll cop for the lot - after all, it's what he really deserves after all his struggle through life!

Seeing as Jeremy is a fictional character you made up yourself, it's pretty easy to pick on his character flaws. I wonder how well you know the millions of unemployed young in this country.

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The point I was trying to make is that the JSA system doesn't always reflect the needs of the claimant. Andy is asking for £102 a week to help feed, cloth and keep his family warm - and he can't get it, whilst Jeremy will get £52 a week to buy the latest version of Call of Duty and spend the rest on a round of drinks with his mates (unless you believe that he will give his mum money towards his 'keep').

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Yes, poor thing. Not his fault he's a shiftless git. Still, looking on the bright side, his mum and dad will snuff it one day and he'll cop for the lot - after all, it's what he really deserves after all his struggle through life!

I don't like the way you think......what problem do you have?

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The point I was trying to make is that the JSA system doesn't always reflect the needs of the claimant. Andy is asking for £102 a week to help feed, cloth and keep his family warm - and he can't get it, whilst Jeremy will get £52 a week to buy the latest version of Call of Duty and spend the rest on a round of drinks with his mates (unless you believe that he will give his mum money towards his 'keep').

You said in your own opening post that there are plenty of other benefits Andy could claim "to help feed, clothe, and keep his family warm". What's your point exactly?

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The point I was trying to make is that the JSA system doesn't always reflect the needs of the claimant. Andy is asking for £102 a week to help feed, cloth and keep his family warm - and he can't get it, whilst Jeremy will get £52 a week to buy the latest version of Call of Duty and spend the rest on a round of drinks with his mates (unless you believe that he will give his mum money towards his 'keep').

Sorry but you missed out quite a few benefits they can claim apart from Job Seekers. How about Working families tax credit, child tax credit, housing benefit/Allowance, council tax benefit, child benefit for starters. Then don't forget the fringe benefits like free prescriptions, free dental care, school dinners.

This site is not the right one to try and make up shit like this, most of the posters know how the system works.

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Seeing as Jeremy is a fictional character you made up yourself, it's pretty easy to pick on his character flaws. I wonder how well you know the millions of unemployed young in this country.

As it happens I work in a Jobcentre. I interview Andy's and Jeremy's every day. I treat them both the same way, with respect and as helpfully as I can. Without labouring the point I see the injustice is in that Andy's case is means tested whilst Jeremy's is not. I have a son myself who is presently signing on and, frankly, my heart bleeds for him and unemployed youth in general. I know as well, and possibly better than most ,how desperate times are for them.

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As it happens I work in a Jobcentre. I interview Andy's and Jeremy's every day. I treat them both the same way, with respect and as helpfully as I can. Without labouring the point I see the injustice is in that Andy's case is means tested whilst Jeremy's is not. I have a son myself who is presently signing on and, frankly, my heart bleeds for him and unemployed youth in general. I know as well, and possibly better than most ,how desperate times are for them.

So can you say whether the Tories are correct when they say there are hundreds of thousands of jobs available for the unemployed?

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So can you say whether the Tories are correct when they say there are hundreds of thousands of jobs available for the unemployed?

There are plenty of jobs available to the unemployed, it's just none of them pay enough to cover the rent/mortgage.

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So can you say whether the Tories are correct when they say there are hundreds of thousands of jobs available for the unemployed?

I wish. I'm on a Fixed Term Appointment myself and will be on the other side of the desk in January.

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I wish. I'm on a Fixed Term Appointment myself and will be on the other side of the desk in January.

I'm sorry to hear that. I suspect the Tories are going to encounter trouble as they force the unemployment number to swell.

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If true, govt ministers see the welfare state is more of a problem, than the lack of jobs available..

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1301255/Revealed-The-quarter-million-homes-ones-job.html

There are about five million people on key out-of-work benefits, almost four times as many as those claiming the main dole – jobseeker’s allowance. Ministers claim the root of the problem has more to do with the flawed welfare state than a lack of jobs. There were an estimated 486,000 unfilled posts in June, 10,000 up on March.

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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