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http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/lifestyle/article-23868332-boris-the-builder-the-mayors-vision-for-london-housing.do

"Since 1980 there have been no mandatory minimum space standards for housing in the UK, ever since the famous Parker Morris standards for Space in the Home, which were drawn up in 1961, were abolished by Margaret Thatcher's government in 1980."

"More excitingly, it is hoped that the guide will be part of the updated London Plan after 2012, and as such will be planning policy — meaning it will cover all new housing in the private sector, too."

Nice one Boris. Keep up the good work and avoid fell walking.

p-o-p

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http://www.thisislon...ndon-housing.do

"Since 1980 there have been no mandatory minimum space standards for housing in the UK, ever since the famous Parker Morris standards for Space in the Home, which were drawn up in 1961, were abolished by Margaret Thatcher's government in 1980."

"More excitingly, it is hoped that the guide will be part of the updated London Plan after 2012, and as such will be planning policy — meaning it will cover all new housing in the private sector, too."

Nice one Boris. Keep up the good work and avoid fell walking.

p-o-p

But will they sell for "peanuts"?

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It sounds very positive:

At the heart of the standards are minimum floor areas for new homes built in the capital. A one-bedroom flat must now have a net internal area of at least 50 sq m

I hope these standards will also be extended to cover conversions.

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At the heart of the standards are minimum floor areas for new homes built in the capital. A one-bedroom flat must now have a net internal area of at least 50 sq m, and there are minimum floor areas for every type of dwelling defined by the estimated number of inhabitants. For example, a house or maisonette with three bedrooms and four occupants (a typical enough family home) must have at least 87 sq m.

The only problem with this is that you are increasing the development cost per unit.

That means that either you will see less homes being built, or they will be more expensive, or both.

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At the heart of the standards are minimum floor areas for new homes built in the capital. A one-bedroom flat must now have a net internal area of at least 50 sq m

I hope these standards will also be extended to cover conversions.

Most one bedroom flats which have been "refurbed" into two-bedroom flats (sticking the kitchen on a lounge wall and turning the old kitchen into a bedroom) would struggle to pass that standard!

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I'm surprised by the figure of 50m2 for a one-bed flat - it's big.

At the moment we live in a terraced 2 bedroom house - 49m2.

Is Boris deliberately waving an exaggerated figure, waiting for the builders to scream, then he will reduce it to the number he was thinking of all along?

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I'm surprised by the figure of 50m2 for a one-bed flat - it's big.

At the moment we live in a terraced 2 bedroom house - 49m2.

Is Boris deliberately waving an exaggerated figure, waiting for the builders to scream, then he will reduce it to the number he was thinking of all along?

London is very important to the Tories. They will make it a nice place for their type. If you are not their type, expect to be squeezed out.

p-o-p

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The only problem with this is that you are increasing the development cost per unit.

That means that either you will see less homes being built, or they will be more expensive, or both.

It's a price worth paying in the long run. Otherwise it's a race to the bottom in size & quality.

Edit: If it was just about economics, surely there would be a market for slightly bigger but more expensive 2-bed houses, no? But there isn't, is there. Instead what happens is a would-be bigger 2-bed house is mangled into a small 3-bed to push it into the next price bracket, etc.

Edited by efdemin

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Great news, go Boris! I hope the government follow suit.

I see the studio minimum size is 36-37m2, that's pretty spacious. My first bedsit was, at a push, 15m2 including the bathroom. :lol:

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London is very important to the Tories. They will make it a nice place for their type. If you are not their type, expect to be squeezed out.

p-o-p

What exactly is "their type"?

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It's a price worth paying in the long run. Otherwise it's a race to the bottom in size & quality.

Edit: If it was just about economics, surely there would be a market for slightly bigger but more expensive 2-bed houses, no? But there isn't, is there. Instead what happens is a would-be bigger 2-bed house is mangled into a small 3-bed to push it into the next price bracket, etc.

What is really needed is a legal requirement to state full height usable, naturally illuminated, area in square metres in all sales literature.

In the UK we boast about the 'number of bedrooms', hence the race to the bottom. In the rest of europe they compare square metres.

That is why the typical UK two bed flat is smaller than the typical continental one bed flat.

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I think this is wrong.

If people want to pay good money to live in a pokey box, it's their business. The market should decide how big accommodation is, not a bureaucrat.

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I think this is wrong.

If people want to pay good money to live in a pokey box, it's their business. The market should decide how big accommodation is, not a bureaucrat.

In general I agree that the market should decide, but it seems reasonable that building regulations should include minimum space requirements.

Normally if someone buys a shoddy product they would be the only one who suffers, but poor quality housing becomes a long-term blot on society.

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In general I agree that the market should decide, but it seems reasonable that building regulations should include minimum space requirements.

Normally if someone buys a shoddy product they would be the only one who suffers, but poor quality housing becomes a long-term blot on society.

Could you put your old avatar in your sig so that I remember who you are?

Ta,

p-o-p

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bulling.jpg

.......and their acolytes.

p-o-p

People like that are not affected by minimum size standards though.

And probably don't buy one bed flats with the kitchen in the living room. Even in Chelsea!

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People like that are not affected by minimum size standards though.

And probably don't buy one bed flats with the kitchen in the living room. Even in Chelsea!

The acolytes like to feel special too.

p-o-p

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London is very important to the Tories. They will make it a nice place for their type. If you are not their type, expect to be squeezed out.

p-o-p

Yeah, London has been staunchly returning Tories across the board for ages hasn't it?

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I think this is wrong.

If people want to pay good money to live in a pokey box, it's their business. The market should decide how big accommodation is, not a bureaucrat.

+1

Trouble is that the market is controlled by bureaucrats in so many other ways that leaving one bit unregulated amidst a mass of regulation can produce bad results. If there were no planning regs at all there wouldn't need to be any boxes at all.

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  • 238 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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