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Trailer Parks In London?

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You see this in the US alot but apart from traditional travellers Is this the future in London too ??? :blink:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2010/aug/16/london-commuters-living-under-canvas

It is a mystery to many how ordinary people can afford to live in the UK's capital. Consistently ranked one of the most expensive cities in the world, London's house prices are ever more ludicrous, even in these dark days of pay freezes, mass redundancies and bankruptcy.

Visit one of the campsites encircling the city and it becomes clear how some people make the sums work: by shunning bricks and mortar to live in tents, caravans and mobile homes.

Each morning at these sites the shower blocks teem with commuters washing, shaving and making themselves presentable for a hard day's graft in the big smoke.

Last week a council worker called Philip Hanman hit the papers when he claimed he had been forced out of his job after his bosses discovered he was commuting to work in Barking and Dagenham in east London from a campsite in Epping Forest, where he slept in a £30 tent. Hanman has taken voluntary redundancy from the council and now lives with his family in Cornwall, where he previously spent his weekends.

Camping commuters are far from rare in the capital. On the Lee Valley site in Edmonton, north London, near a monster branch of Ikea and surrounded by pylons, 40 pitches are reserved for "long-termers".

Many of them work constructing the Olympic park, driving buses or in other jobs in the city, returning to their "real" homes at the weekend.

Here, in a neat caravan, lives one of the more unusual residents. Last year Lucy Boggis, 21, spent her days chasing amateur athletes up a climbing wall in her role as Tempest in the Sky series of Gladiators. Now, she is devoting all her energy to the 2012 Olympics, where she hopes to represent Britain in the heptathlon.

With no lottery funding, money is tight. So last September she decided to set up camp at the Lee Valley site, which is next door to an athletics centre.

Each morning, she makes herself porridge on the small van's stove, before padding over to the shower block for a wash.

She's at the track for 9am, and spends the day practising the hurdles, high jump and the other five disciplines that make up her event. On the weekends she goes home to her family in the West Country. "Some of my fellow athletes take the mickey, but most of them actually think it's a good idea. If you don't have funding, you don't have much spare money, and it's much cheaper to stay in a caravan than rent a one-bedroom flat," she said.

Lee Valley is one of the more expensive sites around London, charging between £12.30 and £16.40 a night for a one-person pitch, depending on the season, plus £3.60 per day for electricity.

In a caravan a few doors down from Boggis lives IT contractor Keith Davidson, who commutes to Canary Wharf each day.

The City is less than an hour away by public transport, with a regular bus service stopping at the site and taking campers to the nearest station.

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You see this in the US alot but apart from traditional travellers Is this the future in London too ??? :blink:

....jobs in the city, returning to their "real" homes at the weekend.

Here, in a neat caravan, lives one of the more unusual residents. Last year Lucy Boggis, 21, spent her days chasing amateur athletes up a climbing wall in her role as Tempest in the Sky series of Gladiators. Now, she is devoting all her energy to the 2012 Olympics, where she hopes to represent Britain in the heptathlon.

With no lottery funding, money is tight. So last September she decided to set up camp at the Lee Valley site, which is next door to an athletics centre.

Each morning, she makes herself porridge on the small van's stove, before padding over to the shower block for a wash.

She's at the track for 9am, and spends the day practising the hurdles, high jump and the other five disciplines that make up her event. On the weekends she goes home to her family in the West Country. "Some of my fellow athletes take the mickey, but most of them actually think it's a good idea. If you don't have funding, you don't have much spare money, and it's much cheaper to stay in a caravan than rent a one-bedroom flat," she said.

Lee Valley is one of the more expensive sites around London, charging between £12.30 and £16.40 a night for a one-person pitch, depending on the season, plus £3.60 per day for electricity.

In a caravan a few doors down from Boggis lives IT contractor Keith Davidson, who commutes to Canary Wharf each day.

The City is less than an hour away by public transport, with a regular bus service stopping at the site and taking campers to the nearest station.

Whenever I read stuff like this I always think there must be an easier way to make a living.

This is exactly why that Council worker nogiated a 4 day week, for his convenience rather than the Councils.

Anyway, could you claim it as an expense as an IT contractor? Sounds like you would spend most of your time at the campsite. How do you say what is your main address? The one you spend most time at? What about if you didn't have your own house, did this camp malarky and then round-robined the weekend at families/friends as a guest? What would your main address be then?

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Whenever I read stuff like this I always think there must be an easier way to make a living.

This is exactly why that Council worker nogiated a 4 day week, for his convenience rather than the Councils.

Anyway, could you claim it as an expense as an IT contractor? Sounds like you would spend most of your time at the campsite. How do you say what is your main address? The one you spend most time at? What about if you didn't have your own house, did this camp malarky and then round-robined the weekend at families/friends as a guest? What would your main address be then?

There are quite a few websites for 'full timing' campers in vans. It doesn't seem worth it to live on a campsite full time, though I can see the advantages of spending one or two nights a week in one to fill up on water and empty your chemical toilet, while 'wild camping' in the suburbs the rest of the time. I'm pretty sure a few people are doing this round my way (Highgate/Hampstead, London) as I've seen a few vans with curtains parked up residential side streets at night.

As for full time address most people seem to give that of parents or friends - if you are completely 'off grid' it can cause problems with the authorities (obviously we can't have anybody not paying rents or mortgages - that would never do!) and you have to be fairly hard core to do this.

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Just shows how unbalanced the UK economy is.

London is where the work is but London is too expensive for the workers to live in.

Quality of life is cr ap in this country re stress, commutes, cost of living, etc and I can only seeing it getting worse and more London-centric.

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Interesting, there seems to be a general stigma attached to living in a cramped caravan or motorhome you actually own rather than a, probably not a lot less cramped, slave box flat the bank really owns in Thamesmead.

I bet councils don't like this from a tax revenue point of view. Given the advances in solar power, alternative energy sources, LED lighting and mobile broadband there's probably never been a better time to do it.

Edit to add: It's a bit of a non-story as builders and similar have always done this sort of thing to live where the work is and every army base you see had a good number of caravans parked on it.

Edited by Soon Not a Chain Retailer

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Vast difference between the two. Here in the US "Trailor Park" usually corresponds with "Trailor Trash" as in drug-infested low-lifes on welfare. Not always but the rule of thumb. Would seem that the London situation is purely down to working guys and gals who can't afford anything else.

Edited by tomwatkins

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Interesting, there seems to be a general stigma attached to living in a cramped caravan or motorhome you actually own rather than a, probably not a lot less cramped, slave box flat the bank really owns in Thamesmead.

I bet councils don't like this from a tax revenue point of view. Given the advances in solar power, alternative energy sources, LED lighting and mobile broadband there's probably never been a better time to do it.

Great points made. It will really p!ss off the local councils (and the service providers as well) if you have your own jenny, etc. Lovely jubbly.

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As an IT contractor myself Id definitely think about getting a motor home to live in if I had to work away from home. For London especially it makes a lot of sense. Compared to the alternatives which are train/tube commute (2 hours, £100/day), or local accommodation (£75/day cheap-ass hotel), paying £20-£30/day for a bay is an absolute bargain.

Some years ago I was on a project where one of the guys owned and lived on a boat.

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As an IT contractor myself Id definitely think about getting a motor home to live in if I had to work away from home. For London especially it makes a lot of sense. Compared to the alternatives which are train/tube commute (2 hours, £100/day), or local accommodation (£75/day cheap-ass hotel), paying £20-£30/day for a bay is an absolute bargain.

Some years ago I was on a project where one of the guys owned and lived on a boat.

Could you claim it as expenses though as my previous points and also worth bearing in mind this can't be a long term solution for way too many reasons to list. What a life we are forced to lead!

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I've always dreamed of doing this. Buying one of those s*****y vw california things with double glazing etc however nearly £20 a day to park it somewhere seems steep and where do you register the vehicle if you've sold your place for it :) .

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Reminds me of that joke - what's the difference between a hurricane and divorce in the deep South?

Answer: Nothing. One way or the other, someone's losing a trailer.

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Could you claim it as expenses though as my previous points and also worth bearing in mind this can't be a long term solution for way too many reasons to list. What a life we are forced to lead!

If it was your sole place of residence then no tax could be reclaimed against it.

If, as it would be in my case, it was accommodation away from ones main residence then I could offset the costs against tax. If I were renting the trailer itself I could probably offset that against tax too so long as I could show I didnt use it for non work related purposes. Buying vehicles for business use is a tax nightmare so lets not go there.

Even with no tax offset it would be a relatively cheap way of me staying away from home while working.

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  • 261 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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