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Laura

Will The Pension Time Bomb Set Off A Crime Explosion?

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http://www.taipanpublishinggroup.com/tpg/taipan-daily/taipan-daily-081110.html

When state and local budgets fall short, services are cut. That means critical services like police and fire and transport... and with the pension crisis looming, the unkindest cuts of all still lay ahead.

Diane Cunningham of Colorado Springs, Colo., no longer has a flat-screen television. She decided to sell it... so she could buy a shotgun.

Colorado Springs shut off a third of its streetlights this past winter, The New York Times reports, in order to save $12 million on electricity. Shortly thereafter, a chain of events convinced Ms. Cunningham she needed to be armed.

"Her tires were slashed, she said. Her car was broken into. Strange men showed up on her porch. Her neighborhood had grown deserted at night..."

Meanwhile, in East St. Louis, Mo., Reverend Joseph Tracy is convinced guns are the problem. (Guns in the hands of criminals, that is.)

"It's open field day now," Tracy says. "The criminals are going to run wild." That dire prediction came from a decision by city council members, as reported on stltoday.com, to reduce the ranks of the East St. Louis police force by 30%.

Alvin Parks, the mayor of East St. Louis, says the city had no choice but to lay off 37 employees, including 19 police officers and 11 firefighters. There was simply not enough money to pay them, and attempts to negotiate with the police and fire unions came to naught.

Officer Michael Hubbard will reportedly be "the lone patrolman for East St. Louis' midnight shift" as a result of the cuts. One lone beat cop, to cover a crime and poverty-stricken region, at the most dangerous time of night.

When the Money Runs Out

What do the above tales of woe have to do with public pensions? It's simple: Most states and municipalities have balanced budget laws. Unlike the federal government, they are not allowed to run deficits. And so, when the money runs out, services are cut. Budget areas critical to residential safety - like police, fire and street lighting - are not spared the axe.

And when the pension time bomb well and truly explodes, cash-strapped states and cities will find themselves even shorter on cash... with huge payout requirements they can't legally dodge... and the Hobson's choice of slashing services to the bone or going belly up.

continues

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Either the country will be bankrupted to pay unearned pensions to the undeserving, or people won't be getting the pensions they thought they were going to get. Probably the easiest way to break the pension promises would be to impose a cap - no public pension of more than £50K pa. That way most people wouldn't be affected and it could be sold to them as securing their lesser pension at the cost of a fat cat's.

Of course, once the cap is on, it can be pushed down as far as required. ;)

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In one way americans are lucky, slowly lowered into state failure with cities and counties imploding first, states later on, and finally the federal govt.

When it happens here, it will all go at once. People will wake up and find the NHS is no more, the currency destroyed and unable to buy essential drugs. Thanks, inflationistas.

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In one way americans are lucky, slowly lowered into state failure with cities and counties imploding first, states later on, and finally the federal govt.

When it happens here, it will all go at once. People will wake up and find the NHS is no more, the currency destroyed and unable to buy essential drugs. Thanks, inflationistas.

Hope it happens on a Friday so we've got the weekend to get over it.

p-o-p

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In one way americans are lucky, slowly lowered into state failure with cities and counties imploding first, states later on, and finally the federal govt.

When it happens here, it will all go at once. People will wake up and find the NHS is no more, the currency destroyed and unable to buy essential drugs. Thanks, inflationistas.

Why do you posit a sudden catastrophic failure?

More likely is a gradual erosion of everything: public services reduced, quality of life reduced, cost of living increased, taxes increased. Take a small example: road quality is much lower than it was 20 years ago, there are far more potholes and patches on the roads. This is due to a greater percentage of the money pot going to pay pensions and a lesser percentage being spent on workers and asphalt.

Likewise, police are less in evidence, scholastic standards are falling, hidden behind grade inflation, hospital-acquired infections are soaring, and the price of charged-for public services is rising, eg parking charges, passport charges etc.

States don't normally implode. They just wind down. In our case choked to death by debt and the growth of a non-productive parasitic class of pensioners, sick people, unemployables and the like.

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I was expecting a tale of armed pensioners marauding across the USA in a spate of rape and pillage.

Instead its a Daily Mail style fear campaign about readers being subjected to unimaginable crime waves by the lower orders.

"Her neighbourhood had grown deserted at night..." She was perhaps hoping for gangs of youths roaming the streets to make it feel less lonely?

Note the phrase "the criminals are going to run wild" - in other words nothing has happened yet. Fear politics, just as the USA has elections coming up. What a surprise.

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Guest spp

Time for China or some other peace keeping country to invade the U.S now I think.

Peace and 'Democracy' must be restored! Now all we need is a false flag and in they go.

Hey, what's good for one is good for the other. ;)

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Either the country will be bankrupted to pay unearned pensions to the undeserving, or people won't be getting the pensions they thought they were going to get. Probably the easiest way to break the pension promises would be to impose a cap - no public pension of more than £50K pa. That way most people wouldn't be affected and it could be sold to them as securing their lesser pension at the cost of a fat cat's.

Of course, once the cap is on, it can be pushed down as far as required. ;)

You BNP lot are as sneaky as the other lot aren't you.

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More likely is a gradual erosion of everything: public services reduced, quality of life reduced, cost of living increased, taxes increased. Take a small example: road quality is much lower than it was 20 years ago, there are far more potholes and patches on the roads. This is due to a greater percentage of the money pot going to pay pensions and a lesser percentage being spent on workers and asphalt.

Hmm...I think it's more to do with the cold winter we had destroying the roads, and the general budget deficit leaving no money to repair them.

Likewise, police are less in evidence, scholastic standards are falling, hidden behind grade inflation, hospital-acquired infections are soaring, and the price of charged-for public services is rising, eg parking charges, passport charges etc.

Than when? When was that utopian time that education and health were perfect and no-one had to pay for them?

Many of the changes are swings and roundabouts to me rather than anything else.

For example, it is demonstrable that A-Levels are easier, but is that necessarily "standards falling"? The reality is more that there has been a levelling out of standards - instead of having a few children doing hard A-Levels we have all children doing easy A-Levels. From the point of view of those children who, 30 years ago weren't clever enough to be considered for A-Levels, have standards fallen?

Similarly, hospital-acquired infections are soaring, but because money has gone on other things such as new drugs and treatments that cure people who 30 years ago would have died (albeit died in a clean ward).

Now I don't agree with all the changes - I wouldn't choose to make A-Levels easier for example - but I honestly don't think life as a whole is much different, it's just that some things are better and some worse.

We could easily return to 1950s living if people wanted to, but they don't want to. They don't want Dad to work while Mum stays at home washing clothes by hand and cooking, the family to own one car and no TV, holidays to consist of one week at Bournemouth, people to retire at 65 and die at 70. A typical family today wants two cars, three TVs, four mobile phones, foreign holidays, and expects to live to 90 and the NHS to pick up the tab!

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This report squares with my personal experience. My partner, who lives in Eastern California, was the victim of two attempted burglaries last month (the first attempt to break in was interrupted by her gardener, the second by her alarm going off). The perpetrators are almost certainly illegal Mexican immigrants living in a trailer park / shanty town type place that sprung up on the outskirts of San Bernadino (the locals joke that this is Spanish for 'you don't want to go there') a few weeks ago, as a wave of burglaries and armed robberies in the surrounding towns followed its arrival. The police officer who attended the second incident removed a bloodstained fragment of broken window for analysis, but told her quite bluntly that it was a low priority case and that due to the pressure on police resources, the work would take 6-8 months. Even the forensic work for rape cases can take several weeks, he said, and basically told her that she was on her own as far as protecting herself from burglars was concerned. They are also very reluctant to prosecute Hispanics, because various civil liberties campaign groups will provide them with top notch legal representation and thus the costs of the prosecution will skyrocket.

This is a significant part of the reason why we're looking at her coming to Britain after we're married (although the biggest ones are immigration rules and job prospects) rather than me going to the US. Things have apparently got to the stage at which law enforcement in California is only really interested in white collar crime and traffic offences (cheap to prosecute and with the prospect of income from fines on conviction).

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Either the country will be bankrupted to pay unearned pensions to the undeserving, or people won't be getting the pensions they thought they were going to get.

Why do we always have the assumption that all civil service pension are undeserved? They may be a little generous, but in many cases the employees contributed towards them and worked for decades in good faith.

A lot of people here go on about the government defaulting on pensions like it's some magic bullet, ignoring the fact that unless you intend to turn all the pensioners into soylent green, someone, one way or another, is going to have to pay to house, feed and cloth them and for their medical care during there dieing days.

You people need to get over yourselves and accept that there is a huge debt that has to be paid and no-one is going to magic it away for you so you can have a nice comfy life like your parents did.

The debt is there, it has to be paid. Someone, eventually, has to pay the piper.

Edited by TaxAbuserOfTheWeek

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Why do you posit a sudden catastrophic failure?

More likely is a gradual erosion of everything: public services reduced, quality of life reduced, cost of living increased, taxes increased. Take a small example: road quality is much lower than it was 20 years ago, there are far more potholes and patches on the roads. This is due to a greater percentage of the money pot going to pay pensions and a lesser percentage being spent on workers and asphalt.

Likewise, police are less in evidence, scholastic standards are falling, hidden behind grade inflation, hospital-acquired infections are soaring, and the price of charged-for public services is rising, eg parking charges, passport charges etc.

States don't normally implode. They just wind down. In our case choked to death by debt and the growth of a non-productive parasitic class of pensioners, sick people, unemployables and the like.

They usually wind down and then implode, tbh.

i suspect the stuff you are talking about there is the wind down.

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Why do we always have the assumption that all civil service pension are undeserved? They may be a little generous, but in many cases the employees contributed towards them and worked for decades in good faith.

A lot of people here go on about the government defaulting on pensions like it's some magic bullet, ignoring the fact that unless you intend to turn all the pensioners into soylent green, someone, one way or another, is going to have to pay to house, feed and cloth them and for their medical care during there dieing days.

You people need to get over yourselves and accept that there is a huge debt that has to be paid and no-one is going to magic it away for you so you can have a nice comfy life like your parents did.

The debt is there, it has to be paid. Someone, eventually, has to pay the piper.

It is going to be paid, on time, in full. Once it is, we can all get on with something sane instead.

Weimar-Republic-Lady-Using-Money-To-Heat-Home-1923.jpg

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Why do we always have the assumption that all civil service pension are undeserved? They may be a little generous, but in many cases the employees contributed towards them and worked for decades in good faith.

OK, take the police. Work 30 years, aged 20 thru 50 (for example) earn up to 100,000 a year even as a constable, contribute 11% of salary to "pension fund" (which doesn't exist) then retire on two thirds of highest earning year, RPI linked, for the rest of your life. Total contributions are about 3 years' average salary, benefit is 2/3rds of HIGHEST salary until you die, eg aged 85, so say 35 years.

Summary: put 3 years in, get 35 years out. Has any police officer really "paid" for their pension.

Edited by Nationalist

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OK, take the police. Work 30 years, aged 20 thru 50 (for example) earn up to 100,000 a year even as a constable, contribute 11% of salary to "pension fund" (which doesn't exist) then retire on two thirds of highest earning year, RPI linked, for the rest of your life. Total contributions are about 3 years' average salary, benefit is 2/3rds of HIGHEST salary until you die, eg aged 85, so say 35 years.

Summary: put 3 years in, get 35 years out. Has any police officer really "paid" for their pension.

Doesn't matter a junkyard ***** how hard you work to earn a muggers money, it was never his to spend in the first place.

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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