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Kingding

When Would You Turn Down A Job...

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I've been jobhunting lately (no longer thankfully, start on wednesday) and went through a few recruitment companies one of which rang me up and offered me a customer facing job working for a bank in a 9-5, Monday to Friday and the some weekends. I made interested noises and asked what the wages were, 12k P.A. was the answer.

I said that was a pretty abysmal wage for a job like that, especially when the banks were obviously not short of a few quid and I wasn't interested stating I was looking for something a bit more substantial. The recruiter then proceeded to tell me that I was expecting too much and I should take what was offered. I then told her, in not so many words, to go forth and multiply.

Another friend of mine was recently offered 11.5k to work as a manager of a pub which he also turned down saying that sort of wage was a disgrace and quite possibly illegal.

The thing is I have met a lot of folk that say you should take whatever work is offered and be grateful for the opportunity to do so, so the question is, have you ever turned down work, what was the reason and do you think people should take what they are given if the opportunity arises shite wages or not?

I know a lot depends on personal circumstance but I'd like to know what kind of a wage people would personally consider to be taking the piss and just not worth it.

Edit: Ale.

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You spurned the chance to become a banker? Just think of the bonus!

I've no idea of your abilities/qualifications/experience, so I don't really know how to react to your turning it down on grounds of money. Except to congratulate you on making the right call, if your new job is something better.

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You spurned the chance to become a banker? Just think of the bonus!

I've no idea of your abilities/qualifications/experience, so I don't really know how to react to your turning it down on grounds of money. Except to congratulate you on making the right call, if your new job is something better.

Merci Beacoup, it was the right choice, hung on for another week and was then offered a job paying far more which I took.

As for me I have a pretty good degree in English (apologies if it doesn't show tonight, I've had some ales) and a fair bit of experience in everything from being a fireman to working in telecommunications. I'm no Branson but I'd like to think I can turn down 12k wage relatively guilt free.

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I have come away from various job interviews deciding I didn't want the post. Reasons have included:

  • Horrific projected commute time and expense (I was young and hadn't realised how bad getting the train into central London might be :lol:)
  • The interviewer lying to me regarding availability of parking at the premises and answering all my queries about the role with the line "you'll find that out when you join us".
  • The interviewer admitting the role was boring and dead end - top marks for honesty, I suppose.
  • Being faced by a couple of sneering bungholes with huge "why should we hire YOU?" attitudes.

I think a lot of recruiters honestly fail to understand that the interview is a two-way process and that the candidate has the right to say "No".

Best of luck with your new job.

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I have only turned down one job that I actively applied for and persued , and it was simply the fact that the interviewer who was also a director to whom I would be reporting , was an absolute **** in the interview - He seemed to love the idea that I was an older person than him and I would be junior to him - he asked me if I would have 'reservations' about reporting to a much younger man.

His assistant rang and offered me the job and I gracefully declined , only for the nob himself to ring me a short while later quite angry that I had wasted his time applying and acusing me of being afraid to be junior to a young person - strange bloody experience tbh

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Guest Noodle

I have only turned down one job that I actively applied for and persued , and it was simply the fact that the interviewer who was also a director to whom I would be reporting , was an absolute **** in the interview - He seemed to love the idea that I was an older person than him and I would be junior to him - he asked me if I would have 'reservations' about reporting to a much younger man.

His assistant rang and offered me the job and I gracefully declined , only for the nob himself to ring me a short while later quite angry that I had wasted his time applying and acusing me of being afraid to be junior to a young person - strange bloody experience tbh

Always, ALWAYS carry a cattle prod at work. Charge it every night. Adjust the voltage to MAXIMUM.

I find this works. ;)

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Some years ago my boss of the time was headhunted for a certain firm. He (without my knowing it) insisted on taking me too. I was offered a post but turned it down on the basis of what the firm did - massive tobacco company. So yes, I've turned a job down and it was for ethical reasons - I don't mind people smoking if they've made an informed choice to do so, but I do mind the few exploiting the masses whilst profiting from their addiction.

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Always, ALWAYS carry a cattle prod at work. Charge it every night. Adjust the voltage to MAXIMUM.

I find this works. ;)

I find a good loom does the trick - being a big bugger I can loom with the best !

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When I became self-employed my accountant told me that if my take-home pay was not enough for me to pay my bills, put some money away for retirement and still have money for fun then the salary was not enough.

Usually I turn down jobs due to the personality disorders I perceive in those interviewing me.

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Guest Noodle

When I became self-employed my accountant told me that if my take-home pay was not enough for me to pay my bills, put some money away for retirement and still have money for fun then the salary was not enough.

Usually I turn down jobs due to the personality disorders I perceive in those interviewing me.

Yup. There's a lot of them out there too. Paranoid androids I call 'em. Condescending, patronizing, all manner of complexes principally inferiority and identity. Big tie knots . . . always a sign. I look at friends that went into organised crime and although I don't condone it I can understand it.

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Yup. There's a lot of them out there too. Paranoid androids I call 'em. Condescending, patronizing, all manner of complexes principally inferiority and identity. Big tie knots . . . always a sign. I look at friends that went into organised crime and although I don't condone it I can understand it.

Yeah - what is it with the big tie knots ? inverse correlation to penile dimension ?

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11.5 k to work as a pub manager.... what a cheek. The hours and stress involved really aren't worth it. I'd rather flip burgers (and probably earn as much?).

It seem some personnel managers think we're back to the good old days of the 80's, when the "lucky to have a job" mentality ruled supreme.

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Guest Noodle

Yeah - what is it with the big tie knots ? inverse correlation to penile dimension ?

Terrible insecurity. Sub-consciously they know they are really no use to man nor beast. The big tie knot is like a security blanket.

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You could earn more flipping burgers on a 40 hour week - I reckon managing a pub would be much longer hours.

Yeah it was very long hours, the .5 part of the salary was what they said they could go to after he refused the original 11k offer. :blink:

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Yeah it was very long hours, the .5 part of the salary was what they said they could go to after he refused the original 11k offer. :blink:

Nuts. They're basically inviting an individual who will fiddle the books, rob the tills, to work for them. Not the best business sense, really.

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Nuts. They're basically inviting an individual who will fiddle the books, rob the tills, to work for them. Not the best business sense, really.

That is so true. Pretty much everyone in the F&B sector is stealing from the employer in some way - they're practically forced to in some cases. Very low trust business.

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i started off in a bank several years ago on the same money. Always felt as tho i was being ripped off so made sure i took any exams they would pay for, used up plenty sick days and then shipped out as soon as qualified. Frack them i thought

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Bugger working for £12k or so!!

I would have turned it down as well.

Not long ago I beat 500 people to a job but I turned it down also - it paid £5k less than my last job and was smack in the centre of town. I'd had enough of commuting. Ended up getting a job paying more even closer to where I live.

How can wages for these jobs be SO LOW???

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I have only turned down one job that I actively applied for and persued , and it was simply the fact that the interviewer who was also a director to whom I would be reporting , was an absolute **** in the interview - He seemed to love the idea that I was an older person than him and I would be junior to him - he asked me if I would have 'reservations' about reporting to a much younger man.

His assistant rang and offered me the job and I gracefully declined , only for the nob himself to ring me a short while later quite angry that I had wasted his time applying and acusing me of being afraid to be junior to a young person - strange bloody experience tbh

Which goes to show how right you were. Clearly this chap had little experience of interviewing. He didn't realise that only part of the interview process is to evaluate you. Another part is for you to evaluate him/his company. Yet another part is for him to convey why it will benefit you to work for him. And of course its not over when he's offered you the job, he should keep checking that you continue to feel the same way and are eager to turn up on the appointed day.

A company that fails to understand its a two-sided process where both parties should feel (slightly) eager to be working with the other is likely to treat its staff as commodities.

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So yes, I've turned a job down and it was for ethical reasons

And me.

I once applied for a job to do with designing traffic lights, of all things (this was a long time ago) in some obscure part of GEC, and got offered one designing anti-personnel mines. Very nasty work - most people don't last long cos the idea of sitting at your desk thinking of ways to main and injure most effectively without outright killing (maximal psychological effect) kind of gets to them...

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Might have taken the pub job if it was local, a good pub, and included all the food I could eat. Long hours in a good pub with good staff are not so bad, and as it is very social, highly preferable to being on the dole.

Good luck with the new job!

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And me.

I once applied for a job to do with designing traffic lights, of all things (this was a long time ago) in some obscure part of GEC, and got offered one designing anti-personnel mines. Very nasty work - most people don't last long cos the idea of sitting at your desk thinking of ways to main and injure most effectively without outright killing (maximal psychological effect) kind of gets to them...

I can see that the skillsets required for these two product classes are similar.

p-o-p

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I dont think I've ever turned down a job

I've walked away from a few due to being treated like sh1t

one of the best jobs I had was working 90 hrs /wk

caring for physically/mentally handicapped for food and lodgings

it never made me wealthy but it taught me never to feel self pity again

sometimes you can gain more from a job than your paypacket

as the old saying goes

you work to live not live to work

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And me.

I once applied for a job to do with designing traffic lights, of all things (this was a long time ago) in some obscure part of GEC, and got offered one designing anti-personnel mines. Very nasty work - most people don't last long cos the idea of sitting at your desk thinking of ways to main and injure most effectively without outright killing (maximal psychological effect) kind of gets to them...

Cor that's harsh, I couldn't do something like that. I was in Cambodia a while ago and those things are still causing hideous havoc over there. I thought they were banned?

Someone who I know who works with BAE had to explain in quite lengthy detail in the interview why he wouldn't have a problem working on machines of war (I think he worked on the Eurofighter).

Just looking at some of the jobs on the go some of them are incredibly low paid, especially graduate jobs, I know these are a "foot in the door" job but you'd be back living with mummy while you worked for them.

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i've turned down a few, most of them have been companies approaching/headhunting me. The usual reasons are that they don't give me the right career progression or don't involve work that I am interested in.

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  • 146 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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