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In-Store Print On Demand Book Machine Video

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Guest Noodle

There's a good chance pre-fab housing will become the norm with screw-in pile foundations becoming popular. This doesn't mean a 1950's lime green asbestos shed that has remarkably lasted 60 years.

Quality should be excellent if factory produced. Much faster build time on-site.

Again, it comes down to land prices and how much local authorities want in s.106 agreement monies.

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My university library was seriously looking into getting one of those book machines. They strike me as the perfect solution for mass-circulation textbooks: you can print as many as is needed to cope with short-term demand. When they wear out you can simply put them in the recycling bin and print a replacement, and if there comes a time when you don't need so many copies on the shelf (e.g. if a module that used the book is discontinued) you can also bin all but one or two, secure in the knowledge that you can run off replacements if they're ever needed in future.

I think it was only licensing issues that turned them against it in the end: basically, the major academic publishers won't supply in electronic form, or allow the library to scan, anything but a tiny proportion of their total holdings and so the machine would have ended up as a white elephant. But as a technology it strikes me as the perfect compromise between the best of both worlds: the simple usability of a book in hard copy form with the ease of access that comes with having it in digitised form.

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I had the biggest shock when I went into a library for the first time in 3 years (returning books for somone else). There were no staff! The entire process had been automated. You put the book on a shelf, it takes a photo of it and tells you who you are and what you are returning, and you put the book in a drawer/pay fine if you have any with a coin slot. It looked like a similar process for taking books out. No visible staff (who I presume just restock shelves)

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I had the biggest shock when I went into a library for the first time in 3 years (returning books for somone else).  There were no staff!  The entire process had been automated.  You put the book on a shelf, it takes a photo of it and tells you who you are and what you are returning, and you put the book in a drawer/pay fine if you have any with a coin slot.  It looked like a similar process for taking books out.  No visible staff (who I presume just restock shelves)

I'm sure the former librarians can retrain into an economic sector thats booming in the UK , manufacturing for example? :lol:

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I saw one of those machines about 10 years ago at a trade fair and at the times thought in a few years they'd be all over the place. It's a great way to make everything 'in print', even stuff that isn't viable to be reprinted in the traditional manner.

The biggest users of these things seem to be online vanity publishers.

I think with eInk readers, perhaps this won't ever go mainstream.

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There's a good chance pre-fab housing will become the norm with screw-in pile foundations becoming popular. This doesn't mean a 1950's lime green asbestos shed that has remarkably lasted 60 years.

Quality should be excellent if factory produced. Much faster build time on-site.

Again, it comes down to land prices and how much local authorities want in s.106 agreement monies.

Anyone remember the Grand Designs episode with the pre-built Huf Haus in Surrey? That particular one wasn't cheap though.

ED: Ooops! Houses - OT - Cringes...sorry.

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  • 245 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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