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German Economy Sees 'record' Growth Of 2.2% Qoq

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-10962017

The German economy grew by 2.2% in the three months to the end of June, its fastest quarterly growth in more than 20 years, official figures show.

"Such quarter-on-quarter growth has never been recorded before in reunified Germany," the national statistics office, Destatis, said.

The main reason for the higher-than-expected growth was strong exports, helped by a weaker euro.

Well done Angie.

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But this is simply not possible. The West is dead it cannot compete anymore, and Germany is practically a bloody socialist nation. The future is the free globalised market and the BRICS nation, China will rule all. Obviously some mistake here.

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That would explain why I'm being snowed under with German to English technical translation work at the moment. It's a good line to be in because fewer and fewer technically-minded native English speakers learn German these days. Increasing demand and falling supply = more money for me! :)

And its a lot easier than working as software developer, as I used to, and having to compete against 2 billion Indians and Chinese.

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I admire so much about Germany - their way of life and attitudes, and of course their economy.

I started learning the language a few weeks ago in anticipation of working for a spell out there.

Unless you go an live there for a few years at least you'll neve speak it well enough to get any job but pushing a mop. Also, the opinion of the auslander counts for little even if you can speak German.

I worked in Leipzig for a year and admire exactly nothing about Germany as a result.

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Unless you go an live there for a few years at least you'll neve speak it well enough to get any job but pushing a mop. Also, the opinion of the auslander counts for little even if you can speak German.

I worked in Leipzig for a year and admire exactly nothing about Germany as a result.

So they give jobs to locals before foreigners. Sounds worse and worse !

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The rest of the beeb article went on to suggest that there might be some one off factors at work (including the same construction sector catching up after the harsh winter that was mentioned with the UK figures recently):

"The strong second quarter performance of the German economy is impressive but not surprising," said Carsten Brzeski at ING Financial Markets.

"The German economy mainly benefited from two factors - a catching up in the construction sector after the harsh winter and strong foreign demand for German goods."

Despite the strong figures, economists do not expect the German economy to continue growing at such a fast pace.

"Looking ahead, it is almost needless to say that the current growth momentum is hardly sustainable in the coming months. With the one-off impact from the construction sector and normalising of export growth, German growth will return to more ordinary numbers," Mr Brzeski said.

My suspicion is that there is a reasonable deal of inventory rebuild at work with GER/UK figures, so it will not be so good for Q3, the US are ahead by about 2-3 quarters on this but I suspect the rate of GDP growth will not fall as spectacularly here as in the US.

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Unless you go an live there for a few years at least you'll neve speak it well enough to get any job but pushing a mop. Also, the opinion of the auslander counts for little even if you can speak German.

I worked in Leipzig for a year and admire exactly nothing about Germany as a result.

I think attitudes in the East and West of Germany are still very different. I lived and worked in the Rhineland for 10 years and found most of the Germans I met there to be warm and friendly. I'd still be living there now but for personal circumstances.

Edited by snowflux

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My suspicion is that there is a reasonable deal of inventory rebuild at work with GER/UK figures, so it will not be so good for Q3, the US are ahead by about 2-3 quarters on this but I suspect the rate of GDP growth will not fall as spectacularly here as in the US.

Yes, and industrial production figures are always volatile.

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Guest Skinty

Unless you go an live there for a few years at least you'll neve speak it well enough to get any job but pushing a mop. Also, the opinion of the auslander counts for little even if you can speak German.

My plan would be to go there as an engineer or scientist, which are far more respected professions than in the UK and they can be far more willing to hire people who don't speak fluent German. This is especially so in academia.

Last time I was unemployed it was a toss up between Germany or Scotland as to where I would move, whichever opportunity came up first. Most of the opportunities seemed to do with contracting so I am going to develop my skills in this area before my current contract runs out in three months time.

Edited by Skinty

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My plan would be to go there as an engineer or scientist, which are far more respected professions than in the UK and they can be far more willing to hire people who don't speak fluent German. This is especially so in academia.

Last time I was unemployed it was a toss up between Germany or Scotland as to where I would move, whichever opportunity came up first. Most of the opportunities seemed to do with contracting so I am going to develop my skills in this area before my current contract runs out in three months time.

Phew, always knew those Germans were idiots, they need to knock that rubbish on the head and become btl landlords, loadsa moneeeeey

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My plan would be to go there as an engineer or scientist, which are far more respected professions than in the UK and they can be far more willing to hire people who don't speak fluent German. This is especially so in academia.

Last time I was unemployed it was a toss up between Germany or Scotland as to where I would move, whichever opportunity came up first. Most of the opportunities seemed to do with contracting so I am going to develop my skills in this area before my current contract runs out in three months time.

Yes, that is certainly true. When I first went to Germany, my German wasn't brilliant, but because I had good qualifications this was no hindrance to getting a job. Indeed, being a native English speaker can be a distinct advantage since English is used for most international communication and it's always useful to have an expert on hand! Some companies even use English for their internal communications, though it tends to be a rather odd, Germanised version.

Having said that, you'll want to get on with learning German as quickly as you can if you want to have a reasonable degree of social interaction too.

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Guest Noodle

Unless you go an live there for a few years at least you'll neve speak it well enough to get any job but pushing a mop. Also, the opinion of the auslander counts for little even if you can speak German.

I worked in Leipzig for a year and admire exactly nothing about Germany as a result.

I guess it's not a great example because his mother is German but my friend Sylvie's brother David was the Minister President of Lower Saxony, CDU from 2003 until July this year. Only 39 now and has a Scottish family name. He was very popular and everyone called him by his nickname 'Mac'. Terrific bloke.

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Phew, always knew those Germans were idiots, they need to knock that rubbish on the head and become btl landlords, loadsa moneeeeey

Germany is as dependant on borrowed money to sell their goods as their customers are to buy them. How much of this 'growth' is a result of government stimulus in the likes of the UK and China?

The Germans are not buying.

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Guest Noodle

It's amazing what can be achieved by making it illegal to make people redundant.

Like no employment?

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People around the world are happy to pay extra for this magic phrase MADE IN GERMANY.

Overall, the German industry is well organised, disciplined and comes up with practical solutions that look good and last for long. How can they go wrong?

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Guest Noodle

People around the world are happy to pay extra for this magic phrase MADE IN GERMANY.

Overall, the German industry is well organised, disciplined and comes up with practical solutions that look good and last for long. How can they go wrong?

Yup.

This place was the 2nd biggest consumer of Mercedes-Benz in the world, 2nd only to the US in the 1990's, before the 1997 crash.

Those Miele washing machines are all the rage amongst our well heeled posters on this forum. Scary money though.

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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