Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

@contradevian

Why I'm Dumping Ubuntu For Good

Recommended Posts

Yes I know Ubuntu is free but my time isn't. The latest round of Ubuntu updates have once again left me with a dud Acer netbook. This is about the third time this has happened. The only time I've been able to fix the issue in the past is to re-install the operating system, and it always was a PITA the screen resolution right due to the gfx the Acer uses.

Ubuntu now boots, flashes and flickers a few times (as X tried to start) then leaves me with a black screen. I then have to forcibly power it off by holding down the power button (curiously I then get a purple screen as it shuts down). I can't even seem to do the traditional Linux stuff of getting back to the console or booting to init 3 so you can tinker around at the command prompt.

Anyway, lesson learned will get the data off the drive somehow (thankfully SSH server is running so I'll get into the stupid thing that way) wipe and go back to good old Windows Vista or upgrade to 7! I'm kind of tempted to go back to FreeBSD a whirl again, if I don't have to spend a year getting X to work properly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I know Ubuntu is free but my time isn't. The latest round of Ubuntu updates have once again left me with a dud Acer netbook. This is about the third time this has happened. The only time I've been able to fix the issue in the past is to re-install the operating system, and it always was a PITA the screen resolution right due to the gfx the Acer uses.

Ubuntu now boots, flashes and flickers a few times (as X tried to start) then leaves me with a black screen. I then have to forcibly power it off by holding down the power button (curiously I then get a purple screen as it shuts down). I can't even seem to do the traditional Linux stuff of getting back to the console or booting to init 3 so you can tinker around at the command prompt.

Anyway, lesson learned will get the data off the drive somehow (thankfully SSH server is running so I'll get into the stupid thing that way) wipe and go back to good old Windows Vista or upgrade to 7! I'm kind of tempted to go back to FreeBSD a whirl again, if I don't have to spend a year getting X to work properly.

I have noticed this as well with some of the updates, though may be software I've added causing incompatibility with the updates.  Ubuntu is ok if you stick to the core and Canonical apps, but you can muck it up if you play around with apt-get install to much.

I will try Windows 7 on my Acer and see how that goes. I was worried about the screen size/resolution given how impressive Windows 7 can be in terms of graphics , but I have now seen it running on netbooks and it looked all ok.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have noticed this as well with some of the updates, though may be software I've added causing incompatibility with the updates. Ubuntu is ok if you stick to the core and Canonical apps, but you can muck it up if you play around with apt-get install to much.

I will try Windows 7 on my Acer and see how that goes. I was worried about the screen size/resolution given how impressive Windows 7 can be in terms of graphics , but I have now seen it running on netbooks and it looked all ok.

If you have the Acer Aspire 10 ZA3, then avoid Ubuntu like the plague. They will tell you compatability is good. It isn't, its marginal at best. The ZA3 requires the Paulsbo graphics drivers, which were a PITA to start with (and require a different repository). I always used to cross fingers and hope for the best with every passing update. This time I wasn't lucky.

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1349269

Anyway failed to get into the thing via a network, so boot/rescue disc, dd/copy/wipe this crap off the hard drive and put a professional OS on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The "fix" is actually here:

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1549761&highlight=gma500&page=2

But going to put on Windows 7 so can do "stuff" with this netbook again, though nearly £100 for "home premium" is a little off putting! :lol:

I don't know if you are a student, or can borrow one?

http://www.software4students.co.uk/Microsoft_Windows_7_Professional_32_bit_Upgrade_Edition-details.aspx

Towards checkout,

Am I eligible?

Students in any level of education and their family members are eligible.

Still think you should stick with it though :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if you are a student, or can borrow one?

http://www.software4...on-details.aspx

Towards checkout,

Still think you should stick with it though :P

Bit old to be a student.

Already got one Ubuntu netbook, two could be seen as "misfortune" (with apologies to Oscar Wilde). :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I put Ubuntu 10 onto my fiances laptop recently - the screen wouldn't even show up.

Put 9.04 on and voila! No problem at all.

It's soooooo much quicker than Windows.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm running openSUSE linux 11.3 on my new Toshiba laptop. It installed with no problems, apart from having to download and install the WLAN driver seprately. It works just fine and absolutely flies compared with the pre-installed Windows 7 that I can still boot from another partition. For Windows applications, I also run a copy of Windows XP under VirtualBox in openSUSE with no problems and very good performance.

I've been using the openSUSE / XP combination for everyday work for years now, and I'm very happy with that setup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I put Ubuntu 10 onto my fiances laptop recently - the screen wouldn't even show up.

Put 9.04 on and voila! No problem at all.

It's soooooo much quicker than Windows.

Don't worry, they will break that, on the next update!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All the goodness of unix, with none of the pain of installing Linux. Go on, you know you just want to.

macbook-pro-unibody-17-1.jpg

Warning: attempts to explore the wonders of package management under OSX might lead to bouts of depression.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All the goodness of unix, with none of the pain of installing Linux. Go on, you know you just want to.

Warning: attempts to explore the wonders of package management under OSX might lead to bouts of depression.

True, Linux is years away from producing a desktop as good as OSX and probably never will. Then again Linux has to support a far wider range of hardware. For example the issue's with laptop is that the GMA500 graphics are not really fully supported, well kind of, but on updates they tend to be "forget" that some users will need this particular kernel source, and that xserver to continue working. And due to the distributed nature of Linux's development, they are always having to play catchup, not having access to the spec's or even the hardware in question. What I probably need to do is "donate" my Acer to them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All the goodness of unix, with none of the pain of installing Linux.

Except in your wallet?

In these belt-tightening days, Ubuntu is starting to look more and more attractive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just curious, why do you keep upgrading to the latest release? If it's new required functions, fine but if the older version workd why change?

These are normal updates, not upgrades.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Except in your wallet?

In these belt-tightening days, Ubuntu is starting to look more and more attractive.

Your time has a cost - time spent editing config files by hand is fun when you're learning a new system, but just expensive otherwise.

I used to have a linux machine (Mandrake; does that make me an old timer?), learnt plenty about the innards, and the experience was valuable as I'm now happy to configure linux-based servers in my job.

However, it got repetitive to always have niggling issues with security upgrades; system upgrades were lots of niggling changes in the configs and wild changes in the GUI.

Macs are expensive, but for me they justify their price because they (mostly) Just Work and the GUI is sane and stable - e.g. keyboard shortcuts are pretty much standardised across all apps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable

All the goodness of unix, with none of the pain of installing Linux. Go on, you know you just want to.

macbook-pro-unibody-17-1.jpg

Warning: attempts to explore the wonders of package management under OSX might lead to bouts of depression.

Yeah, I use VMWare Fusion to run Windows and a few flavours of Linux.

The snapshot option is quite handy so that you can roll back to previous versions if things break.

The nice thing about VMWare is that you can use hardware peripherals natively as you would on a boot install of the operating system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your time has a cost - time spent editing config files by hand is fun when you're learning a new system, but just expensive otherwise.

I'll stick with Windows then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your time has a cost - time spent editing config files by hand is fun when you're learning a new system, but just expensive otherwise.

I used to have a linux machine (Mandrake; does that make me an old timer?), learnt plenty about the innards, and the experience was valuable as I'm now happy to configure linux-based servers in my job.

However, it got repetitive to always have niggling issues with security upgrades; system upgrades were lots of niggling changes in the configs and wild changes in the GUI.

Macs are expensive, but for me they justify their price because they (mostly) Just Work™ and the GUI is sane and stable - e.g. keyboard shortcuts are pretty much standardised across all apps.

I used to run Mandrake years ago. Used to be a user friendly version of Red Hat. I think it merged a while back and became Mandriva or something. When I used it a while back it was still very much an RPM based Linux distro and probably still is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ubuntu was a nightmare on my last laptop (an Acer) and I eventually gave up on it, but I've got 10.04 on both my current HP laptop and my desktop at home and they work fine, without any aggro following updates. However, the only non-standard applications I've installed are Audacity, Skype, Filezilla and Eudora - nothing truly exotic to argue with updates to core stuff.

From everything I've heard, Ubuntu and Acer hardware don't mix.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why use anything other than XP? Even Windows 2000 is still an excellent OS.

I still use Win2K on three of my machines. The problem with Win2K these days and increasingly XP is that many newer items of software simply are not supported in the older O/Ss . The newest photoshop for instance only works on XP, I guess the newer iteration will only work on vista and windows 7.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still use Win2K on three of my machines. The problem with Win2K these days and increasingly XP is that many newer items of software simply are not supported in the older O/Ss . The newest photoshop for instance only works on XP, I guess the newer iteration will only work on vista and windows 7.

Yeh I would be tempted to put XP on this Acer, but I suspect there would now be hardware support issue's. By the way "Acer Aspire One" covers a wide multitude of sins. My little Acer One netbook is a success with Ubuntu, much better than XP it came with, my larger Acer with the GMA500 chipset is a bit more hit and miss.

Anyway, everything up and working again, after 20 mins of Googling and buggering about. Always keep OpenSSH running so you can at least get into the thing via the network.

I don't know why, but Ctl-Alt-Backspace always used to kill an X session and Ctl-Alt-F1 would get you to a console window. Not any more it seems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

got ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron running on my acer T7200 laptop, seems to work ok although I have turned off automatic updates. Switching between laptop screen and an external TFT was a bit painful at first but now it's down to commenting/uncommenting some lines in the X config file.

Well switching screens and multiple screens with Linux has always been a high risk strategy, however that actually works quite well under the latest Ubuntu, and can plug in my little Acer into a big widescreen TFT. There is now a little graphical utility to achieve this (no text editors needed!). It doesn't cope very well running two different sized screens simultaneously obviously.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know why, but Ctl-Alt-Backspace always used to kill an X session and Ctl-Alt-F1 would get you to a console window. Not any more it seems.

They dropped it about 3 releases ago but it's easy to switch back on:

System - Preferences - Keyboard - Layouts - Options - Key Sequence to Kill the X Server - click Ctl-Alt_Backspace.

All those clicks may give you RSI though.

ED: Terminal - Ctrl-Alt-T.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 138 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.