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Sledgehead

Deeds For Nowt : Is It A Generation Thing

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An anecdote that frankly I could not believe, I'm guessing you too.

New (~6 months) next door neighbours inform me they are looking after another neighbours garden whilst that neighbour is away for three weeks. This involves mostly watering and picking produce. Seems normal enough, I'd assume.

What is less normal is that the house will still be occupied by the holidaying neighbour's son. He's a strapping 18 year old. His job, a Mc-job, has reasonable hours, and he is finding time to booze during the week. But no time to tend the garden. Perhaps even more bizarre, his Mum has given money to the new neighbour to dispense to the son on a weekly basis, for the purpose of buying food - presumably of a different nature from that being harvested and watered by the same new neighbours.

Before leaving for the holiday, I lent said holidaying neighbour a lopper to chop down branches from an out-of-control bush. During her efforts she managed to break the lopper which I was happy to repair. On return she asked me how much she should pay her son to remove further overhanging branches.

Its struck me that I was very different from her son and would have done the job for her there and then , if only it did not entail a route march to reach her place (she corner-backs on to me). Just like I frequently sort out an MS suffer's computer problems, water other holidaying neighbours' gardens or take on board other's problems (for instance last weekend I extracted a large tree stump from a pensioner's garden). And these are all just friends and neighbours. The list of what I do for family, gratis, is frankly too long and too boring to mention.

However, here was this son with an elderly mother in not good health, an invalid father, and yet, no sign of willingness to do anything other than for money. I was reminded of a neighbour's daughter who never lifted a finger to help her parents with chores. And a nephew who used their parents kitchen ingredients and kitchen, w/o tidying up, to make cakes, which he then sold, not just to neighbours, but, yep, his own parents! Or another teenager who I pissed off by cleaning a neighbour's guttering, because they charged them for the same service!

So am I part of a lost race that does things for nothing, and if so, if children aren't helping their elderly parents / neighbours / friends, who is, what are they charging and how is that filtering into the gdp figures? Presumably under such circumstances, the economy appears to grow, even at a time when nothing more useful is being done and society bonds are being weakened. I suspect the same can be said of the deeds normaly performed for free by mothers, now being charged for professionals (nurseries) and taxed by government.

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So am I part of a lost race that does things for nothing, and if so, if children aren't helping their elderly parents / neighbours / friends, who is, what are they charging and how is that filtering into the gdp figures? Presumably under such circumstances, the economy appears to grow, even at a time when nothing more useful is being done and society bonds are being weakened. I suspect the same can be said of the deeds normaly performed for free by mothers, now being charged for professionals (nurseries) and taxed by government.

The opposite will also happen as times get harder -- if people start doing & brewing for themselves and their neighbours, the same goods will still be produced and consumed, they just won't show up on the national accounts (or on the government's VAT/excise receipts)

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Not that I disagree with the premise

But maybe you can afford to give away your labour and the young can't? A McJob is fit for little more than beer money after all.

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Not that I disagree with the premise

But maybe you can afford to give away your labour and the young can't? A McJob is fit for little more than beer money after all.

Bear in mind that the default brainwashing a teenager receives is one that tells him:

He is worth it.

Greed is good.

Get rich or die trying.

He can do anything or be anything.

If he isn't a millionaire by the age of 25 he is a failure and it is all his fault.

When it turns out that all he can get is a McJob if he is lucky but the expenses required to live the lifestyle he has been trained to expect require an income 100 times greater, well things don't work out so well...

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An anecdote that frankly I could not believe, I'm guessing you too.

New (~6 months) next door neighbours inform me they are looking after another neighbours garden whilst that neighbour is away for three weeks. This involves mostly watering and picking produce. Seems normal enough, I'd assume.

What is less normal is that the house will still be occupied by the holidaying neighbour's son. He's a strapping 18 year old. His job, a Mc-job, has reasonable hours, and he is finding time to booze during the week. But no time to tend the garden. Perhaps even more bizarre, his Mum has given money to the new neighbour to dispense to the son on a weekly basis, for the purpose of buying food - presumably of a different nature from that being harvested and watered by the same new neighbours.

Before leaving for the holiday, I lent said holidaying neighbour a lopper to chop down branches from an out-of-control bush. During her efforts she managed to break the lopper which I was happy to repair. On return she asked me how much she should pay her son to remove further overhanging branches.

Its struck me that I was very different from her son and would have done the job for her there and then , if only it did not entail a route march to reach her place (she corner-backs on to me). Just like I frequently sort out an MS suffer's computer problems, water other holidaying neighbours' gardens or take on board other's problems (for instance last weekend I extracted a large tree stump from a pensioner's garden). And these are all just friends and neighbours. The list of what I do for family, gratis, is frankly too long and too boring to mention.

However, here was this son with an elderly mother in not good health, an invalid father, and yet, no sign of willingness to do anything other than for money. I was reminded of a neighbour's daughter who never lifted a finger to help her parents with chores. And a nephew who used their parents kitchen ingredients and kitchen, w/o tidying up, to make cakes, which he then sold, not just to neighbours, but, yep, his own parents! Or another teenager who I pissed off by cleaning a neighbour's guttering, because they charged them for the same service!

So am I part of a lost race that does things for nothing, and if so, if children aren't helping their elderly parents / neighbours / friends, who is, what are they charging and how is that filtering into the gdp figures? Presumably under such circumstances, the economy appears to grow, even at a time when nothing more useful is being done and society bonds are being weakened. I suspect the same can be said of the deeds normaly performed for free by mothers, now being charged for professionals (nurseries) and taxed by government.

It's not an age issue, but a family/cultural one. If that lad is like that, his parents had a major hand in it.

And no, you're not part of a lost race, just a slightly diminished one.

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In defence of the young, I volunteer for a national charity, and some of our best volunteers are in their early 20s.

I'm sure you and they do a wonderful job. I am however minded of the expression "charity begins at home".

I don't need to remind you how bureaucratic or self-serving charities have become. If your neighbour wants her fence post fixed, you can spend £300 of charity donor's money ... or you can do it yourself. The latter however does not help the likes of Zac Goldsmith. Neither will it put a badge on one's scout-fit. I chose the title of this thread with some care ...

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  • 152 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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