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Petrol 103p/ltr Where I Live

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was 95p yestersay, local esso garage just changed to 103p for unleaded, 104p for diesel  :o

come on you fuel protestors  :angry:

Am I the only one that thinks this is a good thing?

Edit: Good that petrol has gone up? Maybe this might make the financially stretched sell in desperation :blink:

Edited by OzzMosiz

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was 95p yestersay, local esso garage just changed to 103p for unleaded, 104p for diesel  :o

come on you fuel protestors  :angry:

Gordon will be pleased. He gets more tax and his spin doctors will describe this as an increase in factory output.

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Am I the only one that thinks this is a good thing?

Edit: Good that petrol has gone up? Maybe this might make the financially stretched sell in desperation  :blink:

No your not the only one , this is great front page stuff. The sort of news that makes the masses depressed which in turn makes me,and you, happy. Another piece to the jigsaw Roll on HPC

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Am I the only one that thinks this is a good thing?

Edit: Good that petrol has gone up? Maybe this might make the financially stretched sell in desperation  :blink:

I think this is fantastic, roll on £1.20p/litre :blink: even if it costs me more!!

This will put the squeeze on.

Can we correlate this or work out how much fuel has to rise to have the equivalent effect to say 0.25% on interest rates or anything else? Does anyone know the average consumption per household per month?

Anyway this is going to hurt the hauliers, airlines, all transport, reps, £1/litre is the barrier where the end begins.

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I think this is fantastic, roll on £1.20p/litre  :blink:  even if it costs me more!!

This will put the squeeze on.

Can we correlate this or work out how much fuel has to rise to have the equivalent effect to say 0.25% on interest rates or anything else? Does anyone know the average consumption per household per month?

Every $10 on crude knocks 0.25% off GDP.

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Am I the only one that thinks this is a good thing?

I need to commute from Blackpool to Central London fairly regularly.

I've tried doing it by train twice (Virgin Rail Preston to Euston) which takes about 3 hours versus driving which takes 6 hours in the day and 4 at night.

In my car I get a seat. On the train I have to sit on the floor with people stepping over me, on the last occasion with a broken air con system with water p***ing out of the ceiling and my head against the bin in the first class car since it was the only 2 sq ft of space on the entire train and I was "lucky" to get it.

I can sit in reasonable comfort in the car with the air con and stereo on. And since it's a new car I'm pretty much guaranteed to get there and back, whereas with the train the prospect of being dumped somewhere with no way home is a real possibility and has happened to me twice in recent years, the last time it was in New Barnet at 6am and I had to pay £40 for a taxi to move on.

I can rent a car at late notice, drive down and back, go where I need to go, and it still costs less than or about the same as the train.

It also means I can drive right into London and park (expensed to Client along with the fuel and congestion charge) and thus don't have to use the tube which in the rush hour has got to be the most horrendous way to travel and certainly not an attractive option at the moment.

When there is an alternative to travelling by car, I'll consider it, and I'm sure most people would. I'd love to be able to commute in comfort and use my laptop on the way there and back, but there presently exists no means to do so which is fit for human use.

Having to drive just increases our costs, which increase our Customer's costs, so when there is no real alternative I don't see who benefits.

The other option is to fly, which is cheaper than the train, but I don't expect that's a lot better for the environment than a car is, and then you still have to use a train at the other end.

Until the entire rail system is entirely re-nationalised (at least Labour have gone some way in that direction) and properly funded, I don't see that there will ever be a viable alternative.

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was 95p yestersay, local esso garage just changed to 103p for unleaded, 104p for diesel  :o

come on you fuel protestors  :angry:

That's just under £40,000 worth - per full Tanker!

Do those guys have armoured cabs? :o

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Jeez you lot got it quite bad, last night my local went from 90p a litre to 93.9.

(St Albans, Herts)

It's always been cheaper in that area, when I worked in Watford I always made sure I filled up at that end of my journey.

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Here is how the yanks see it:

I was a little disturbed to see the Americans were not even considering green energy sources. I've been doing a little research and it is getting to the point where putting a small wind generator and or solar panel on your roof, plumbed into the grid can pay significant rewards. Over here you can get grants to help out with the installation costs as well.

Hooking up to the grid means that you can sell excess generated power to other users. You can also get battery packs or heat storage systems to store wind / solar generated energy for when you actually need it.

Given it is apparently possible for every house to generate more than enough for current requirements we can solve our problems with the technology available now or at least soon to be available.

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Last night it was still 88.9p a litre at my local Asda. Cars needle is bent though so unless I stockpile it in the shed, I'll be paying higher prices next time I fill up by the looks of it. :(

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A visit to the petrol station still costs me £10...

As a serious point, I've been cycling to work in central London. I do this most summers and the bombings on 7/7 have been a further incentive this year.

Try leaving your car at home for at least one journey a week. Walk, cycle, take the bus or train. It is not impossible to reduce reliance on the car. Its either this or make it a criminal offence to drive a 4x4 on the school run, punishable by being made to car share with John Prescott...

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I was a little disturbed to see the Americans were not even considering green energy sources. I've been doing a little research and it is getting to the point where putting a small wind generator and or solar panel on your roof, plumbed into the grid can pay significant rewards. Over here you can get grants to help out with the installation costs as well.

Hooking up to the grid means that you can sell excess generated power to other users. You can also get battery packs or heat storage systems to store wind / solar generated energy for when you actually need it.

Given it is apparently possible for every house to generate more than enough for current requirements we can solve our problems with the technology available now or at least soon to be available.

I agree with you.

1. We are more independant and less reliant on govt and corporations

2. In a disaster situation you can still servive

3. It makes 'personal' economic sense and is good for the environment.

It wont happen because the govt and corps will lose some control over its sad little worker bees (ie us)

This topic has been covered before, (perfect storm in the classis forum)

The Americans need only cover 11% of Nevada with Solar panels in order to meet the entire US energy needs.

Edited by Crazy88s

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A visit to the petrol station still costs me £10...

As a serious point, I've been cycling to work in central London. I do this most summers and the bombings on 7/7 have been a further incentive this year.

Try leaving your car at home for at least one journey a week. Walk, cycle, take the bus or train. It is not impossible to reduce reliance on the car. Its either this or make it a criminal offence to drive a 4x4 on the school run, punishable by being made to car share with John Prescott...

I'd love to. But I work 10 miles away and the only ways there are by motorway or country lanes, which at 10pm or 6am aren't exactly a safe place for a woman to be on her own.

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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