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Guest X-QUORK

Meal Naming

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I'll raise the point I did before.

If lunch is not dinner, how come the "dinner lady" ?

So if lunch is dinner, tea cannot be dinner and must be tea.

So what's supper?

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Guest X-QUORK

Tea is a drink.

Correct. Eating tea would be an extremely unpleasant thing to do I imagine.

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I put dinner/tea as that's what it was when I was a kid.

Now it's lunch/dinner. Maybe I'm more refined now or because I've moved south but this is what everyone does down here.

Supper was always an optional before-bed meal if you were peckish, never tea-time

I know I'm odd.

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+1 best with milk and sugar

Please don't have caused a thread about the tea making process.

Warm milk, tea bag, tea pot, tea leaves. Phhhhhhssssttttttttaaahhhh.

Shit, did I just create the monster I wanted to slay?

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Guest X-QUORK

Yuck - sugar in tea is heathenism.

There's no accounting for the proletariat.

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Yuck - sugar in tea is heathenism.

So is milk.

Only Brits have this revolting habit, you only learn how revolting it is if you're deprived of the milk for a while, because you never ever want to drink tea with milk again.

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Please don't have caused a thread about the tea making process.

Warm milk, tea bag, tea pot, tea leaves. Phhhhhhssssttttttttaaahhhh.

Shit, did I just create the monster I wanted to slay?

There is one right way to make a cup of tea, ISO3103, formerly BS6008:1980

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_3103

Anything else does not satisfy British Standards.

In brief:

* The pot should be white porcelain or glazed earthenware and have a partly serrated edge. It should have a lid that fits loosely inside the pot.

* If a large pot is used, it should hold a maximum of 310 ml (±8 ml) and must weigh 200 g (±10 g).

* If a small pot is used, it should hold a maximum of 150 ml (±4 ml) and must weigh 118 g (±10 g).

* 2 grams of tea (measured to ±2% accuracy) per 100 ml boiling water is placed into the pot.

* Freshly boiling water is poured into the pot to within 4-6 mm of the brim. Allow 20 seconds for water to cool.

* The water should be similar to the drinking water where the tea will be consumed

* Brewing time is six minutes.

* The brewed tea is then poured into a white porcelain or glazed earthenware bowl.

* If a large bowl is used, it must have a capacity of 380 ml and weigh 200 g (±20 g)

* If a small bowl is used, it must have a capacity of 200 ml and weigh 105 g (±20 g)

* If the test involves milk, then it can be added before or after pouring the infused tea.

* Milk added after the pouring of tea is best tasted when the liquid is between 65 - 80 °C.

* 5 ml of milk for the large bowl, or 2.5 ml for the small bowl, is used.

and you call yourselves British and don't seem to know this simple fact?! :rolleyes:

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Guest X-QUORK

No options for expats.

(So yes, I'm the attention seeker)

Sorry SF, but if I try and cover every language the poll might become a tad unmanageable. ;)

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There is one right way to make a cup of tea, ISO3103, formerly BS6008:1980

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_3103

Anything else does not satisfy British Standards.

In brief:

* The pot should be white porcelain or glazed earthenware and have a partly serrated edge. It should have a lid that fits loosely inside the pot.

* If a large pot is used, it should hold a maximum of 310 ml (±8 ml) and must weigh 200 g (±10 g).

* If a small pot is used, it should hold a maximum of 150 ml (±4 ml) and must weigh 118 g (±10 g).

* 2 grams of tea (measured to ±2% accuracy) per 100 ml boiling water is placed into the pot.

* Freshly boiling water is poured into the pot to within 4-6 mm of the brim. Allow 20 seconds for water to cool.

* The water should be similar to the drinking water where the tea will be consumed

* Brewing time is six minutes.

* The brewed tea is then poured into a white porcelain or glazed earthenware bowl.

* If a large bowl is used, it must have a capacity of 380 ml and weigh 200 g (±20 g)

* If a small bowl is used, it must have a capacity of 200 ml and weigh 105 g (±20 g)

* If the test involves milk, then it can be added before or after pouring the infused tea.

* Milk added after the pouring of tea is best tasted when the liquid is between 65 - 80 °C.

* 5 ml of milk for the large bowl, or 2.5 ml for the small bowl, is used.

and you call yourselves British and don't seem to know this simple fact?! :rolleyes:

Heathen!

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Dinner = main meal of the day.

Up north, main meal at midday, hence dinner. Tea is a smaller meal when back from the factory / fields.

Down South, main meal in the evening, hence dinner. Lunch at midday with all your mates down the club.

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Guest X-QUORK

Dinner = main meal of the day.

Up north, main meal at midday, hence dinner. Tea is a smaller meal when back from the factory / fields.

Down South, main meal in the evening, hence dinner. Lunch at midday with all your mates down the club.

I suspected it might be a North/South thing.

Obviously the South are correct.

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I'll raise the point I did before.

If lunch is not dinner, how come the "dinner lady" ?

Cos you eat a dinner at lunchtime; that dinner being called "lunch"

The dinner you eat at home with the family at 6 pm is called "tea"

If you "go out for dinner", that's a more formal thing and is usually later.

OK ?

;)

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I suspected it might be a North/South thing.

Obviously the South are correct.

There is no real proof that there is a 'North'. I have been there many times and have family that live there, but that is hardly proof.

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Let's sort this out once and for all.

'Dinner' is supposed to be the main meal of the day, whenever you have it.

In this house, that's nearly always in the evening. Can't do with big meals in the middle of the day, not even at weekends. (Unless someone else is cooking and I can have a siesta afterwards. :) )

Oxford dict. says, 'dinner, noun, the main meal of the day, taken either around midday or in the evening.'

Not that I give a toss what anyone likes to call it. I usually manage to call a friend in Leeds when she's in the middle of cooking the tea.

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There is no real proof that there is a 'North'. I have been there many times and have family that live there, but that is hardly proof.

are you Injn ? Here's a test: do you believe in "France" ?

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So what's supper?

Supper is a light evening meal, possibly the only evening meal for someone whose main meal is at midday.

Personally, I usually have lunch at 1pm, dinner around 8pm, and supper around midnight :)

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are you Injn ? Here's a test: do you believe in "France" ?

Oh no, there is definitely a France. Definitely.

I know this because I have never been there. If it didn't exist how could I possibly have never been there?

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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