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Realistbear

Youth Unemployment Soars 42%

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Sadly, I think that we may have passed through the stage where these stats have any meaning.

People will have to stop looking for jobs and start looking for work. A piece of work, say tidying a granny's garden may be a one off and last only a day or two but it is economically productive.

Employment and jobs will become old fashioned ideas.

p-o-p

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Sadly, I think that we may have passed through the stage where these stats have any meaning.

People will have to stop looking for jobs and start looking for work. A piece of work, say tidying a granny's garden may be a one off and last only a day or two but it is economically productive.

Employment and jobs will become old fashioned ideas.

p-o-p

Have we passed the stage where being a graduate will have any meaning? Who knows how this will all wash out.

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work = reward.

no reward = no workee.

Indeed. Employers wonder why young people who don't earn enough to live independently and start building up some savings (or in most cases, start paying down those heart-stopping student debts) don't really care about their jobs. What have they got to care about? Don't work, you've got nothing, work, you've still got nothing. At least they can make themselves feel better temporarily with some consumer tat, a night on the lash or a cheap holiday in the sun.

Edited by Dorkins

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They had a guy on the news this morning, spent 3 years studying philosophy and politics (have you got an 'ology'?) and has set up a business selling organic bike oil in his shed. Good luck and fair play to him, but was that 3 years and 20K or so any use?

Not really. But it has allowed employers to discriminate against those who did not spunk 3 years and 20K up the wall.

Edited by Tonkers

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Indeed. Employers wonder why young people who don't earn enough to live independently and start building up some savings (or in most cases, start paying down those heart-stopping student debts) don't really care about their jobs. What have they got to care about? Don't work, you've got nothing, work, you've still got nothing. At least they can make themselves feel better temporarily with some consumer tat, a night on the lash or a cheap holiday in the sun.

i have a personal friend doing just this. his pay is actually LESS than he neds each month. granted, he is a prize idiot, but for some reason he keeps turning up at work. so far his new lease is 6 months old and he can only afford the fuel for his car to get to work by not paying poll tax. so they will eventually catch up with him soon. why he bothers ? he cant handle being unemployed. cant do the days.

id feel sadder if he wasnt such a useless twit.

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Guest Noodle

i have a personal friend doing just this. his pay is actually LESS than he neds each month. granted, he is a prize idiot, but for some reason he keeps turning up at work. so far his new lease is 6 months old and he can only afford the fuel for his car to get to work by not paying poll tax. so they will eventually catch up with him soon. why he bothers ? he cant handle being unemployed. cant do the days.

id feel sadder if he wasnt such a useless twit.

Told you Brits had the work ethic. Fella like that shouldn't be in that situation though.

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Have we passed the stage where being a graduate will have any meaning? Who knows how this will all wash out.

I've worked with graduates where their education had clearly made a difference and others where it appeared to have been a total waste of time and money. I've worked with non-graduates, some of whom were very good and some who were rubbish.

Save for entry to the professions, I don't think that general degrees will mean that much in a decade. Some people will be able to make a deal and some won't. Deal making for work will be the game - jobs won't.

The welfare state and public sector job market is collapsing. When it finally dies, work will be a very different thing.

p-o-p

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Guest Noodle

I've worked with graduates where their education had clearly made a difference and others where it appeared to have been a total waste of time and money. I've worked with non-graduates, some of whom were very good and some who were rubbish.

Save for entry to the professions, I don't think that general degrees will mean that much in a decade. Some people will be able to make a deal and some won't. Deal making for work will be the game - jobs won't.

The welfare state and public sector job market is collapsing. When it finally dies, work will be a very different thing.

p-o-p

Yes. I'll not go into boring detail, but a big yes. I was surprised what an M.Sc did to a person.

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The perfect employee

- Turns up on time, everytime.

- Only takes proper sick days, and no, not "hangover" sickies.

- Gets the job done, without fuss, with purpose and initiative.

- Does as they are told, without answerig back or bickering/moaning. Accepts constructive feedback.

- Attends work each day with a cheery disposition. Good at teamwork/communicating.

- Looks for work to be done, if it is quiet.

- Does not stand around chatting idly.

- Comes back from breaks on time.

- Ideally non-smoker who doesn't need a fag break every 5 mins(although for bosses/owners it doesn't matter)

- Good personal hygiene.

Get yourself a labrador and you have a perfect match. :D

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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