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bendy

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just got off my rower/bike and been jubbling round the internet whilst cycling and the thought popped into my head of 'could i power this laptop while cycling'?

so i had a gander at some conversion sites and have found the following:

kcal.gif

so a 700 calorie workout gets me some 800 watts of energy, powering this laptop for roughly 6 hours.

so why doesn't the government just get everyone an exercise set and plug it into the grid B)

:lol:

seriously though, an hours exercise 200/365 days a year is some 162kwh, i've no idea what that is on my bill, between 50-100 quid i'd imagine :angry:

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Guest Noodle

just got off my rower/bike and been jubbling round the internet whilst cycling and the thought popped into my head of 'could i power this laptop while cycling'?

so i had a gander at some conversion sites and have found the following:

kcal.gif

so a 700 calorie workout gets me some 800 watts of energy, powering this laptop for roughly 6 hours.

so why doesn't the government just get everyone an exercise set and plug it into the grid B)

:lol:

seriously though, an hours exercise 200/365 days a year is some 162kwh, i've no idea what that is on my bill, between 50-100 quid i'd imagine :angry:

At what energy conversion efficiency?

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just got off my rower/bike and been jubbling round the internet whilst cycling and the thought popped into my head of 'could i power this laptop while cycling'?

so i had a gander at some conversion sites and have found the following:

kcal.gif

so a 700 calorie workout gets me some 800 watts of energy, powering this laptop for roughly 6 hours.

so why doesn't the government just get everyone an exercise set and plug it into the grid B)

:lol:

seriously though, an hours exercise 200/365 days a year is some 162kwh, i've no idea what that is on my bill, between 50-100 quid i'd imagine :angry:

I had a similar thought about using the local gym. Surely some energy for running the building can be harnessed from the sweaty efforts of the punters on cross trainers, treadmills, rowers etc.

Every little helps.

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At what energy conversion efficiency?

are you trying to say i'm inefficient? :lol:

i'm not sure - i suppose humans have a lot of wastage and then i guess it's arbitary depending on the person :huh:

i also know what you mean but compared to it going nowhere it's not a bad plan - if i could buy a battery that had a decent shelf life and it was attached in someway to all exercise equipment and then maybe to the electric meter i'd buy it, dependant on price of course.

Edited by bendybogle

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Guest Noodle

are you trying to say i'm inefficient? :lol:

i'm not sure - i suppose humans have a lot of wastage and then i guess it's arbitary depending on the person :huh:

Dunno for sure but guess 30%. Someone here will know.

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so why doesn't the government just get everyone an exercise set and plug it into the grid B)

Don't give them ideas, they'll probably find it easier to just incinerate your body and recover some energy that way.

Edited by VeryMeanReversion

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Don't give them ideas, they'll probably find it easier to just incinerate your body and recover some energy that way.

matrix-power.jpg

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120 W output on a bike is a brisk riding speed, but not excessive (probably about 15 mph)

The average person might need a bit of training to do that for 8 hours, but it's certainly do-able. Peanuts for a pro rider, of course.

http://www.road-bike.co.uk/articles/cycling-power.php

hmm not sure either my or that conversion charts calcs are right here, i was cycling (at what the machine says what around 27kmh). now (again take all these calcs as machine) after 30 mins i burnt 270 kcal, with 1 kcal being 1.13 watt or summin'.

so an hour on a bike would build around 600 watt into a battery.

however on your link a 27.5kph speed needs only 148 watts, building only around 170 watt into a the mythical battery.

also did some quick calcs in my head comparing a ion lithium laptop battery to a 'exercise battery' and think cost would be the issue as it'd probably be marketed for around £2.5k but maxiumum saving would maybe only be £1400 (unless oil rockets in price :huh: )

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hmm not sure either my or that conversion charts calcs are right here, i was cycling (at what the machine says what around 27kmh). now (again take all these calcs as machine) after 30 mins i burnt 270 kcal, with 1 kcal being 1.13 watt or summin'.

I think you're mixing up energy and power units here. You could work it out from scratch from calories burned (1 kCal =4.2 joules; 1 watt = 1 joule per second, and a human efficiency of about 25%) or you could figure that the gym machines are calculating calories from the power output anyway, and just use the raw power output ability of a human.

however on your link a 27.5kph speed needs only 148 watts, building only around 170 watt into a the mythical battery.

No - it'd give you 148 watt-hours for each hour you pedalled. If your laptop needs 70 W then that'd be 2 hours worth of power.

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A typical modern laptop would probably consume around 70W. Most humans could generate that kind of power on a cycling machine, but not for long periods.

70 W isn't that much. It's easy to output that for a whole day.

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I think you're mixing up energy and power units here. You could work it out from scratch from calories burned (1 kCal =4.2 joules; 1 watt = 1 joule per second, and a human efficiency of about 25%) or you could figure that the gym machines are calculating calories from the power output anyway, and just use the raw power output ability of a human.

No - it'd give you 148 watt-hours for each hour you pedalled. If your laptop needs 70 W then that'd be 2 hours worth of power.

i think i see where you're coming from (e.g. i'm taking it that the machine is creating 270 kcal of power but not taking the wastage element into account, the machine may be only doing half that or less).

either way i think the battery cost (assuming a battery could be produced to harness and store the power, i'm not on about the laptop here anymore, i mean a general house battery placed somewhere) makes the whole idea null and void.

anyway, i'm off to replenish my burn with a couple of cans of guiness, and then head into exercise deficit with a triple brace more. :D

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i think i see where you're coming from (e.g. i'm taking it that the machine is creating 270 kcal of power

I think maybe you're still missing it - calories are a measure of energy, and power is rate of energy production (or use). So you can't equate one to the other without a time being involved - 100W for 1 second is a tenth as many calories as 100W for 10 seconds.

Enjoy the beer workout though. I may go for a run later, to wind down from the bike ride at the weekend :)

Edited by Mal Volio

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just got off my rower/bike and been jubbling round the internet whilst cycling and the thought popped into my head of 'could i power this laptop while cycling'?

so i had a gander at some conversion sites and have found the following:

kcal.gif

so a 700 calorie workout gets me some 800 watts of energy, powering this laptop for roughly 6 hours.

so why doesn't the government just get everyone an exercise set and plug it into the grid B)

:lol:

seriously though, an hours exercise 200/365 days a year is some 162kwh, i've no idea what that is on my bill, between 50-100 quid i'd imagine :angry:

Electricity (in Northern Ireland) costs around 14p per KWhour. So you would save £22.68

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Electricity (in Northern Ireland) costs around 14p per KWhour. So you would save £22.68

at a power of 140 W he'd save about 2p per hour.

edit: and I bet it'd cost more than that in Mars Bars ;)

Edited by Mal Volio

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You can buy the stuff to get started already, although this is a US site: Linky

That's insanely expensive

You could buy a pair of training rollers to ride on, a budget dynamo hub and a converter to give you USB output for a lot less than they charge. OK you'd have to have a front wheel built, but that's not that expensive. It's a DIY job if you have the patience. Plus you'd get a nice front wheel that can power a light and/or a GPS when you're out in the real world :)

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hmm not sure either my or that conversion charts calcs are right here, i was cycling (at what the machine says what around 27kmh). now (again take all these calcs as machine) after 30 mins i burnt 270 kcal, with 1 kcal being 1.13 watt or summin'.

so an hour on a bike would build around 600 watt into a battery.

however on your link a 27.5kph speed needs only 148 watts, building only around 170 watt into a the mythical battery.

also did some quick calcs in my head comparing a ion lithium laptop battery to a 'exercise battery' and think cost would be the issue as it'd probably be marketed for around £2.5k but maxiumum saving would maybe only be £1400 (unless oil rockets in price :huh: )

If you're interested in some competition in 1/2 hour I can do 380 kcal. My next target is 400 kcal. I bet ccc can do more than this.

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A typical modern laptop would probably consume around 70W. Most humans could generate that kind of power on a cycling machine, but not for long periods.

However, as more effort is put into pedalling other power hungry parts of the body (i.e. your brain) will be starved of reduced power. Therefore the necessary skills required to operate a laptop (concentration, clear thinking, hand/eye co-ordination etc.) will suffer.

Just make sure you turn off Windows updates first, incase it suddenly kicks in and snaps your legs.

70W for long periods (say 8 hours) would be easy.

I think though that 120W for the same time would be a bit tricky.

Well, at least for an old man with my knackered legs.

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Sorry. I worded my original response badly. Yes, 70W isn't much and I could (probably do) comfortably generate in excess of that throughout my waking hours.

The challenge is to be able to consistently generate an additional 70W of power, over and above what your body requires to remain concious and function normally.

I suspect most people would have difficulty doing that. I know I would.

For Lance Armstrong, it would be a piece of cake though.

It would be a piece of cake for Lance Armstrong. But I reckon your average man in the street could do 70W for 6 hours. Go down the gym and try - it's not that hard.

Talking about double that though is a different issue.

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Make it illegal for widescreen TVs and Sky boxes to be powered in other way, that would sort things. Then again, it would just encourage a certain sort of person to push out more kids...one for Coronation Street, one for the One Show, two for the football (in case of extra time) etc.

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Guest Noodle

Make it illegal for widescreen TVs and Sky boxes to be powered in other way, that would sort things. Then again, it would just encourage a certain sort of person to push out more kids...one for Coronation Street, one for the One Show, two for the football (in case of extra time) etc.

That's actually quite brilliant.

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Sorry. I worded my original response badly. Yes, 70W isn't much and I could (probably do) comfortably generate in excess of that throughout my waking hours.

The challenge is to be able to consistently generate an additional 70W of power, over and above what your body requires to remain conscious and function normally.

I suspect most people would have difficulty doing that. I know I would.

For Lance Armstrong, it would be a piece of cake though.

I meant that it's easy for most people to output an extra 70 W. It's really not that much. The TdF sprinters will peak a kW or more, and on a climb the riders will be putting out many 100s of watts.

I agree with Steve that 140 W for hours would be...tiring

edit:

That link I provided earlier reckons that for a flat road and a windless day, 120 W is about 25 km/hr. I can maintain that speed for 8 hours under those conditions without too much difficulty, and I'm no superhero.

Edited by Mal Volio

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You see all the un-let commercial office space.

Fill them all with gym cycling machines.

Get unemployed people, volunteers, bored-retired, bored housewives to peddle. There's millions out there who'd do it.

You'd have low energy PC's at each station so they can facebook/read/watch films so they're not bored.

Connect them to the grid.

Pay them not per hour but per Watt.

Export excess energy.

World energy problem solved.

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  • 152 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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