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injustice

Question For The Computer Experts.

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Last week I inherited a new (to me) computer. I switched off my old one, on which I had a spare hard drive for backups. I transferred the spare HD to the new computer, and while at first it recognised it, it later decided that the drive was not there.

I need some documents off the spare drive, and so set up my old computer, and now that will not even power up. I think I am missing something obvious.

Anybody any suggestions?

Cheers.

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Last week I inherited a new (to me) computer. I switched off my old one, on which I had a spare hard drive for backups. I transferred the spare HD to the new computer, and while at first it recognised it, it later decided that the drive was not there.

I need some documents off the spare drive, and so set up my old computer, and now that will not even power up. I think I am missing something obvious.

Anybody any suggestions?

Cheers.

Yes, using a memory stick would have been easier..

That aside, unless you dropped the backup hard drive and it is now broken, you may have to change jumpers for the master/slave settings so that the new computer can recognize it properly; I can't really tell you much more without seeing how the system is set up.

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Yes, using a memory stick would have been easier..

That aside, unless you dropped the backup hard drive and it is now broken, you may have to change jumpers for the master/slave settings so that the new computer can recognize it properly; I can't really tell you much more without seeing how the system is set up.

Thanks fluffy666

Any thoughts on why the old one wont power up any more, all the cables are connected as before, could it be anything to do with the BIOS battery being very old?

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sounded like the spare HDD went pop. If it old and lieing around unused for a while/years the first time you use it it can work for a while and go pop a couple of hours later. I fixed an old laptop (blocked fan), and donated it to someone. The drive survived the install, but died 40 mins into showing the person how to use the laptop...

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Yes, using a memory stick would have been easier..

That aside, unless you dropped the backup hard drive and it is now broken, you may have to change jumpers for the master/slave settings so that the new computer can recognize it properly; I can't really tell you much more without seeing how the system is set up.

Jumpers are small plastic cased pins on the hd. There is normally a bios rest button/jumper on the motherboard (were everthing connects to) try again

with old pc/hd and use a memory stick.

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Thanks fluffy666

Any thoughts on why the old one wont power up any more, all the cables are connected as before, could it be anything to do with the BIOS battery being very old?

No, it would just keep resetting the date/time.

Is it a case of 'won't power up at all', or 'won't boot to windows?'

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No, it would just keep resetting the date/time.

Is it a case of 'won't power up at all', or 'won't boot to windows?'

Wont power up at all. When I press the power button, the light flashes once and then dies.

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Wont power up at all. When I press the power button, the light flashes once and then dies.

That sounds like the old PC has a motherboard problem/PSU problem, so maybe not the HDD.

Does the old HDD either make any noises at all or can you feel it spin up when powered on (probably when attached to the new PC)?

Is it connected by L shaped connectors (SATA) or a big block (PATA/IDE)?

What other HDD's are in the new one? How are they connected up?

Anyone think a new RAID setup might be needed to see the old drive?

Does BIOS show the old drive and it's just windows that can't see it (when connected to the new one?)

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That sounds like the old PC has a motherboard problem/PSU problem, so maybe not the HDD.

Does the old HDD either make any noises at all or can you feel it spin up when powered on (probably when attached to the new PC)?

???

Is it connected by L shaped connectors (SATA) or a big block (PATA/IDE)?

big block (PATA/IDE)

What other HDD's are in the new one? How are they connected up?

HDD on the new machine would seem to be L shaped connectors (SATA)

Anyone think a new RAID setup might be needed to see the old drive?

Does BIOS show the old drive and it's just windows that can't see it (when connected to the new one?)

No. BIOS does not see it.

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Last week I inherited a new (to me) computer. I switched off my old one, on which I had a spare hard drive for backups. I transferred the spare HD to the new computer, and while at first it recognised it, it later decided that the drive was not there.

I need some documents off the spare drive, and so set up my old computer, and now that will not even power up. I think I am missing something obvious.

Anybody any suggestions?

Cheers.

First, a spare HD in the same computer is NOT a backup! An external HD connected only when in use is slightly better, and (like tape, CD/DVD or USB stick) could perhaps qualify if stored off-site. "The Cloud" is another option these days.

As for getting your data, try the disc it's on as - an only disc if necessary - in whatever 'puters you have. A 'puter of the same age as the disc may be the best chance. Borrow one if necessary, or as a last resort take the disc to a local 'puter-doctor and pay them if they can copy your vital data to CD or USB stick. They'll show you what folks who mentioned jumper settings here are talking about, too B)

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Did you have to open the case up to get the hdd out or did it slide out of the front?

You may have dislodged the PSU connector or accidentally bashed the motherboard, if the cabling inside is badly done you might have dislodged/scrapped something without even needing to open the case.

If you open the case up and turn it on, does the cpu fan or case fan spin at all?

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First, a spare HD in the same computer is NOT a backup! An external HD connected only when in use is slightly better, and (like tape, CD/DVD or USB stick) could perhaps qualify if stored off-site. "The Cloud" is another option these days.

As for getting your data, try the disc it's on as - an only disc if necessary - in whatever 'puters you have. A 'puter of the same age as the disc may be the best chance. Borrow one if necessary, or as a last resort take the disc to a local 'puter-doctor and pay them if they can copy your vital data to CD or USB stick. They'll show you what folks who mentioned jumper settings here are talking about, too B)

If you have a working computer buy one of these and you can skip the 'puter-doctor.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/IOMAX-SATA-Adapter-Power-Drive/dp/B001A5SK56/ref=pd_cp_ce_0

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Did you have to open the case up to get the hdd out or did it slide out of the front?

Opened the case.

You may have dislodged the PSU connector or accidentally bashed the motherboard, if the cabling inside is badly done you might have dislodged/scrapped something without even needing to open the case.

Had the case opened umpteen times in the past.

If you open the case up and turn it on, does the cpu fan or case fan spin at all?

It doesn't turn on. I thought it was the power supply at first, but the light on the power button flashes once.

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That sounds like the old PC has a motherboard problem/PSU problem, so maybe not the HDD.

Does the old HDD either make any noises at all or can you feel it spin up when powered on (probably when attached to the new PC)?

???

Is it connected by L shaped connectors (SATA) or a big block (PATA/IDE)?

big block (PATA/IDE)

What other HDD's are in the new one? How are they connected up?

HDD on the new machine would seem to be L shaped connectors (SATA)

Anyone think a new RAID setup might be needed to see the old drive?

Does BIOS show the old drive and it's just windows that can't see it (when connected to the new one?)

No. BIOS does not see it.

Ok, don't screw in the old HDD into the new PC. Put your hand on the top and switch on the power to the PC. You should feel/hear something if the drive is alive.

If not, swap the power cable for another (maybe from the DVD temporarily) and swap the IDE cable to rule out it being those.

Next, and when you do feel/hear something, swap the jumper to the other settings and switch on to see if that makes a difference (usually printed on the label or somewhere, there's 3 settings, master, slave and cable select). Power off, set jumper, power on.

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That looks interesting. How is the drive powered?

You plug it in the wall and then plug the the correct power connector into hdd. Works on any OS that will recognise a plug & play usb hdd.

Well worth the money if you do much data recovery or if you have loads of old hdd that you use occasionally.

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That sounds like the old PC has a motherboard problem/PSU problem, so maybe not the HDD.

Does the old HDD either make any noises at all or can you feel it spin up when powered on (probably when attached to the new PC)?

???

Is it connected by L shaped connectors (SATA) or a big block (PATA/IDE)?

big block (PATA/IDE)

What other HDD's are in the new one? How are they connected up?

HDD on the new machine would seem to be L shaped connectors (SATA)

Anyone think a new RAID setup might be needed to see the old drive?

Does BIOS show the old drive and it's just windows that can't see it (when connected to the new one?)

No. BIOS does not see it.

Ok, don't screw in the old HDD into the new PC. Put your hand on the top and switch on the power to the PC. You should feel/hear something if the drive is alive.

Of not, swap the power cable for another (maybe from the DVD temporarily) and swap the IDE cable to rule out it being those.

Next, and when you do feel/hear something, swap the jumper to the other settings and switch on to see if that makes a difference (usually printed on the label or somewhere, there's 3 settings, master, slave and cable select). Power off, set jumper, power on.

The jumper settings for the old HD are no jumper for slave. It did recognise the HD to begin with.

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You plug it in the wall and then plug the the correct power connector into hdd. Works on any OS that will recognise a plug & play usb hdd.

Well worth the money if you do much data recovery or if you have loads of old hdd that you use occasionally.

Didn't know anything like that existed, my local PC shop says a caddy for about £12 will do the job.

Thank you very much, I will be able to use the old C: Drive as well.

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Didn't know anything like that existed, my local PC shop says a caddy for about £12 will do the job.

Thank you very much, I will be able to use the old C: Drive as well.

A caddy is good if you intend to use a single drive often, the device I linked to allows you to easily access any ide/sata hdd over usb in about 3 seconds flat.

Depends on your need.

If the hdd is shagged, it obviously won't fix it though so be worth making sure the drive spins up first. ;)

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Wont power up at all. When I press the power button, the light flashes once and then dies.

That's not the hard drive, it's quite probably a dead PSU (if lucky) or a dead Mb (if not).

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Have you checked BIOS to see if the IDE controller's been disabled at all (primary or secondary it shows up as in some BIOS'es).

Next I'd have the jumper on master or cable select, oh and double check the leads by swapping the power cable with another from the DVD or something you know works and also consider swapping the IDE cable from the old PC to the new one in case the cable's bad.

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I've heard it said that moving a hard drive while it's still warm after use carries a very high risk of knackering it (and this includes portable ones that come in a case with a USB interface). Certainly I have lost some 2.5" portables in the past, but none since I started leaving them in situ without touching or lifting them for at least 10 minutes after powering them down.

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Wont power up at all. When I press the power button, the light flashes once and then dies.

If you reinstalled the old drive, take it out and see if the system still won't start up.

If it won't start even without the old drive, then I agree with the above posts saying it could be motherboard or PSU -- but it could also be something simple, perhaps you disturbed something while removing the old drive? If I was trouble-shooting it and couldn't fix it by re-seating components, I'd disassemble it and rig everything up on something non-conductive like a big piece of cardboard to see if it works out of the case. But that's getting side-tracked when all you want is data off the old drive...

So it might be better to go with a USB adapter-type solution as suggested above, the one thing I don't like about those is that if the power supply fails you're left with an expensive set of cabling, to get around this I have one of these, which (with suitable cables) can be used to power external drives (both ATA and SATA) from the PC's own supply.

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/SATA-eSATA-2-PCI-BRACKET-POWER-EXTERNAL-CABLE-/230508859776

I personally wouldn't recommend hot-swapping with one of these BTW -- switch off the system before making/breaking connections.

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If you reinstalled the old drive, take it out and see if the system still won't start up.

If it won't start even without the old drive, then I agree with the above posts saying it could be motherboard or PSU -- but it could also be something simple, perhaps you disturbed something while removing the old drive? If I was trouble-shooting it and couldn't fix it by re-seating components, I'd disassemble it and rig everything up on something non-conductive like a big piece of cardboard to see if it works out of the case. But that's getting side-tracked when all you want is data off the old drive...

So it might be better to go with a USB adapter-type solution as suggested above, the one thing I don't like about those is that if the power supply fails you're left with an expensive set of cabling, to get around this I have one of these, which (with suitable cables) can be used to power external drives (both ATA and SATA) from the PC's own supply.

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/SATA-eSATA-2-PCI-BRACKET-POWER-EXTERNAL-CABLE-/230508859776

I personally wouldn't recommend hot-swapping with one of these BTW -- switch off the system before making/breaking connections.

Thanks for the reply. I bought a 3.5inch IDE enclosure for fifteen quid. The old C Drive works fine in this, and I have recovered some of my documents, but the old D Drive is dead, it is no more, it has expired, finished. Such is life, but I will be using the old C Drive as an external 80 gig Drive.

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  • 246 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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