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Sledgehead

They Wanted You To Pay For A Fox Cull

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Following a successful lawsuit against Quantas, in which a 67 year old woman sued the airline for damage caused to her hearing by a 3 year old, airlines are waking up to the prospect of having to lay on al kinds of amusements to keep parents children entertained during long haul flights. That cost will of course be added to the ticket prices of other passengers, whether they have children or not.

During a TV interview, the ditor of Lonely Planet went further, suggesting adults travelling w/o a child prepare themselves for the prospect of having to take responsibility for somebody else's child to ensure a smooth passage.

My questions:

1 ) Is it not the parents of the child who are responsible for their behaviour and should they not stump up for any injuries causes to other travelling adults by their children.

2 ) If we, airline staff / the general public, are to be held responsible for other people's children on long haul flights, how might we act in loco parentis w/o either "undermining" parents or being cast in the role of creepy groomer, and who will pay for the cost of the flight diversion following the inevitable fracas / set-to?

3 ) Should parents not have the good sense to know long hual flights are not suitable environments for young children?

4 ) How should Ryan air fund the fallout (granted not long haul, but these incidents can happen even on short hop): special levies for children or a general hike in ticket prices?

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My questions:

1 ) Is it not the parents of the child who are responsible for their behaviour and should they not stump up for any injuries causes to other travelling adults by their children.

Yes of course it is.

It horrifies me seeing how much lazy parenting is out there.

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I don't know why we constantly have to make everything so complicated. There is no need for analysis. This shit is simple.

Anyone who gets on a plane and doesn't know that children exist and might also be on the plane, is a naive twit. They may not like it, but kids are a part of society. It is perfectly reasonable that they travel.

Any parents who take children on a plane should do all they can to minimise disruption to others and expect complaints if they fail to control their kids adequately. If they know they can't - don't travel with the little buggers.

This system seems to have worked perfectly well for decades.

Give and take. Have a bit of a moan and move on.

Edit: Ha ha, I didn't realise HPC converts tw@t to twit!!

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Sounds like this could have just as easily happened on a bus or a train. What's it got to do with long haul flights?

By the way, could you unpack 2) a bit, it's very busy with lots of "issues".

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By the way, could you unpack 2) a bit, it's very busy with lots of "issues".

compound sentences a problem for you JY?

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Following a successful lawsuit against Quantas, in which a 67 year old woman sued the airline for damage caused to her hearing by a 3 year old, airlines are waking up to the prospect of having to lay on al kinds of amusements to keep parents children entertained during long haul flights. That cost will of course be added to the ticket prices of other passengers, whether they have children or not.

During a TV interview, the ditor of Lonely Planet went further, suggesting adults travelling w/o a child prepare themselves for the prospect of having to take responsibility for somebody else's child to ensure a smooth passage.

My questions:

1 ) Is it not the parents of the child who are responsible for their behaviour and should they not stump up for any injuries causes to other travelling adults by their children.

2 ) If we, airline staff / the general public, are to be held responsible for other people's children on long haul flights, how might we act in loco parentis w/o either "undermining" parents or being cast in the role of creepy groomer, and who will pay for the cost of the flight diversion following the inevitable fracas / set-to?

3 ) Should parents not have the good sense to know long hual flights are not suitable environments for young children?

4 ) How should Ryan air fund the fallout (granted not long haul, but these incidents can happen even on short hop): special levies for children or a general hike in ticket prices?

I suppose legally both are liable but why bother sueing someone who probably hasn't got much money when you can sue the airline which has loads and who probably won't even fight it?

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BA can get some things right.

I recently flew back from holiday with my 7 and 5 year old, who had started to play up at the airport. As we got on I warned them that if they were bad, they'd get thrown out of the door at the back. "Even when we're flying?" they asked, "oh yes" I said nodding at the steward. "Ask the man in the uniform". So they did, and he confirmed that all bad children were indeed thrown out of aeroplanes, took them into the galley at the back, and showed them the emergency exit that was used for bad children.

They were as good as gold all flight...but the oldest was slightly concerned that other children seemed to get away with it.

On the downside their "families must pay to sit together" policy is easily defeated. Get on the plane, park the 5 year old in his seat, and go off to find you own. About 3 minutes later the frantic stewardess appears begging you to sit in the seat that they've magically found for you.

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I will never fly long haul again, until kids are banned from flying, or can be sedated with very heavy drugs. Drugged and caged somewhere in the baggage hold remains an option.

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I will never fly long haul again, until kids are banned from flying, or can be sedated with very heavy drugs. Drugged and caged somewhere in the baggage hold remains an option.

I hear the Channel Islands are nice at this time of year.

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I'm sure if someone set up an over 18s long haul airline it would do a roaring trade even if it were a bit more expensive than a normal airline - I'd happily pay and extra £50 to be guaranteed that the flight would be screaming baby free.

I think if someone set up an over 18 "anything" (coffee shop, cafe, airline, hotel etc..") it would do a roaring trade. The whole country is infested with whining, screaming brats. Strangely not so much a problem once abroad I've noticed.

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I really don't understand why this is the airline's problem. If an adult leaned over and yelled in your ear then they would be done for assault. If the child is that young then hold the parents responsible.

BTW, it is perfectly possible for children to behave on longhaul flights. The first leg of a flight back to the UK from New Zealand I took once was 14 hours from Christchurch to Singapore. Just after I sat down a young Asian mum and her child of, I guess, about 5 years sat down next to me. "Oh crap" though I. I have to say that the child was lovely and behaved immaculately for the entire flight and his mum was wonderful with him too, even encouraging him to speak English with me to get some practice. It can be done, it just takes some effort from the parents.

How about making it a condition for taking a child on a flight that the parents must bring sufficient toys/colouring books/whatever to keep the child occupied and in the event that the child is a nightmare the parents can be fined or refused passage on the airline again? Or is it too much to expect that parents might actually take some f***ing responsibility?

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I'm sure if someone set up an over 18s long haul airline it would do a roaring trade even if it were a bit more expensive than a normal airline - I'd happily pay and extra £50 to be guaranteed that the flight would be screaming baby free.

I think I would support there being a separate area of the aircraft for parents with toddlers where we wouldn't disturb other passengers or be mortified if the kids decide to stage a sit down protest in the aisle with full-effect screaming just as the seatbelt sign goes on. Of course other humans would be welcome to these cheaper seats too as long as they sign a disclaimer and waive their right to sue the airline if a toddler upsets or injures them some how. It'd be a riot back there!

How considerate is that?!

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I'd happily pay an extra £50 for a flight which wasn't full of tutting idiots with nano-scale comfort zones.

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I really don't understand why this is the airline's problem. If an adult leaned over and yelled in your ear then they would be done for assault. If the child is that young then hold the parents responsible.

BTW, it is perfectly possible for children to behave on longhaul flights. The first leg of a flight back to the UK from New Zealand I took once was 14 hours from Christchurch to Singapore. Just after I sat down a young Asian mum and her child of, I guess, about 5 years sat down next to me. "Oh crap" though I. I have to say that the child was lovely and behaved immaculately for the entire flight and his mum was wonderful with him too, even encouraging him to speak English with me to get some practice. It can be done, it just takes some effort from the parents.

How about making it a condition for taking a child on a flight that the parents must bring sufficient toys/colouring books/whatever to keep the child occupied and in the event that the child is a nightmare the parents can be fined or refused passage on the airline again? Or is it too much to expect that parents might actually take some f***ing responsibility?

Screaming babies are one thing. They often get ear trouble on planes and you can't get them to hold their noses and blow to clear it. Not much parents can do except give them something to suck.

Screaming/nuisance older kids are quite another.

My pet hate with other people's brats on planes is the loathsome little s*ds who constantly kick the back of the seat in front. All too often the sort of kids who do this have parents who couldn't give a toss, or even seem to relish their kids irritating the sh*t out of other people . In the past I've resorted to asking one of the cabin staff to tell them.

I often did long haul with my 2 when they were small (starting at 6 weeks and often without Mr B to help) but used to find colouring books or some small new toy would keep them quiet. Never really had any trouble, apart from the inevitable drink spilling etc. Some airlines used to dish out little goodie bags of colouring books etc. but I guess that's in the past.

On night flights I'd take them to the airport in their pyjamas and give them a dose of something like Actifed to help them sleep. :)

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Following a successful lawsuit against Quantas, in which a 67 year old woman sued the airline for damage caused to her hearing by a 3 year old, airlines are waking up to the prospect of having to lay on al kinds of amusements to keep parents children entertained during long haul flights. That cost will of course be added to the ticket prices of other passengers, whether they have children or not.

During a TV interview, the ditor of Lonely Planet went further, suggesting adults travelling w/o a child prepare themselves for the prospect of having to take responsibility for somebody else's child to ensure a smooth passage.

Is there somewhere I can read a version of these events not written by someone who doesn't have children but is for some reason seemingly obsessed by people who do?

Are long haul flight operators really announcing that they are going to lay on all sorts of new costly amusements to be paid for by all passengers?

Did the editor of Lonely Planet really suggest that "adults travelling w/o a child prepare themselves for the prospect of having to take responsibility for somebody else's child to ensure a smooth passage"

really?

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I'd happily pay an extra £50 for a flight which wasn't full of tutting idiots with nano-scale comfort zones.

Good! We'll be able to tut in peace then! :lol:

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...

During a TV interview, the ditor of Lonely Planet went further, suggesting adults travelling w/o a child prepare themselves for the prospect of having to take responsibility for somebody else's child to ensure a smooth passage.

...

Sledge - I don't understand this part of your post... how and under what circs could the airline expect an unrelated adult to take responsibility for another's child? I certainly would not want any intervention of this kind over my children - but then I don't allow mine to riot when flying anyway. Could you expand on the context please?

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BA can get some things right.

I recently flew back from holiday with my 7 and 5 year old, who had started to play up at the airport. As we got on I warned them that if they were bad, they'd get thrown out of the door at the back. "Even when we're flying?" they asked, "oh yes" I said nodding at the steward. "Ask the man in the uniform". So they did, and he confirmed that all bad children were indeed thrown out of aeroplanes, took them into the galley at the back, and showed them the emergency exit that was used for bad children.

OMG you are one SCAREY mum/dad to tell a child that :o

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OMG you are one SCAREY mum/dad to tell a child that :o

Most tell them a unknown old man creeps into their bedroom once a year, and rewards them if they're 'good' :ph34r:

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  • 152 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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