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Revealed: Industrial Revolution Was Powered By Child Slaves

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Child labour was the crucial ingredient which allowed Britain's Industrial Revolution to succeed, new research by a leading economic historian has concluded.After carrying out one of the most detailed statistical analyses of the period, Oxford's Professor Jane Humphries found that child labour was much more common and economically important than previously realised. Her estimates suggest that, by the early 19th century, England had more than a million child workers (including around 350,000 seven- to 10-year-olds) – accounting for 15 per cent of the total labour force. The work is likely to transform the academic world's understanding of that crucial period of British history which was the launch-pad of the nation's economic and imperial power.Early factory owners – located in the countryside in order to exploit power from fast-flowing rivers – found that local labour was scarce and that those agricultural workers who were available were unsuitable for industrial production. They therefore opted instead to create a new work force composed of children, tailor-made for their factories."Factory owners were looking for cheap, malleable and fast-learning work forces – and found them ready-made among the children of the urban workhouses," said Professor Humphries. Her statistical research shows, for the first time, the precise extent to which the exploitation of children massively increased as newly emerging factories began their operations in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.Her work has revealed that during most of the 18th century only around 35 per cent of ten year old working-class boys were in the labour force while the figure for 1791-1820 (when large scale industrialisation started) was 55 per cent, rising to 60 per cent for the period of 1821-1850. We weren't that compassionate after all.... :( ........ http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/revealed-industrial-revolution-was-powered-by-child-slaves-2041227.html

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And its powering countries with booming economies now.

PS My great, great, great, great grandfather served as a coal miner from the age of 7 until his retirement aged 80 and holds the world record for longest serving coal miner, service lasting 73 years. His name was David Davies and his portrait hung in a museum in Moscow (!?) presumably a tribute by the socialist authorities.

And boomers think they've got it hard . . . . .

Edit : Sorry typed at 5:09am not fully awake.

Edited by Dave Spart

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And its powering economies with booming economies now.

PS My great, great, great, great grandfather served as a coal miner from the age of 7 until his retirement aged 80 and holds the world record for longest serving coal miner, service lasting 73 years. His name was David Davies and his portrait hung in a museum in Moscow (!?) presumably a tribute by the socialist authorities.

And boomers think they've got it hard . . . . .

but, but what about his work/life balance ? ok, he probably worked 80 hours a week down the pit. Bet he never got to own his own house either. But Its nothing to todays workers and busy mums lives of hardship and stress laugh.gif How do they cope

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Child labour was the crucial ingredient which allowed Britain's Industrial Revolution to succeed, new research by a leading economic historian has concluded.After carrying out one of the most detailed statistical analyses of the period, Oxford's Professor Jane Humphries found that child labour was much more common and economically important than previously realised. Her estimates suggest that, by the early 19th century, England had more than a million child workers (including around 350,000 seven- to 10-year-olds) – accounting for 15 per cent of the total labour force. The work is likely to transform the academic world's understanding of that crucial period of British history which was the launch-pad of the nation's economic and imperial power.Early factory owners – located in the countryside in order to exploit power from fast-flowing rivers – found that local labour was scarce and that those agricultural workers who were available were unsuitable for industrial production. They therefore opted instead to create a new work force composed of children, tailor-made for their factories."Factory owners were looking for cheap, malleable and fast-learning work forces – and found them ready-made among the children of the urban workhouses," said Professor Humphries. Her statistical research shows, for the first time, the precise extent to which the exploitation of children massively increased as newly emerging factories began their operations in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.Her work has revealed that during most of the 18th century only around 35 per cent of ten year old working-class boys were in the labour force while the figure for 1791-1820 (when large scale industrialisation started) was 55 per cent, rising to 60 per cent for the period of 1821-1850. We weren't that compassionate after all.... :( ........ http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/revealed-industrial-revolution-was-powered-by-child-slaves-2041227.html

What do you mean 'revealed'?

Might as well 'reveal' that Henry VIII had Anne Boleyn's head chopped off.

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So we could do without immigration if we just lower the school leaving age?

We could compete with the Chinese better if sent young kids to work from say age 10. Wouldn't need to pay them. Just offer them them free text message allowances each month. Shut down the nurseries a.k.a. schools. Save a fortune. They won't be causing trouble if they are working.

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I wonder if they had many hoodies standing on street corners drinking and stabbing each other in those days?

They did. Glasgow in the 20's, not a pleasant place to live.

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Something I heard which has always stuck with me, the driving force behind much of the industrial revolution was the salaries paid to British workers being some 10 times that of their Continental counterparts, hence much of the driving force behind automation.

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And its powering economies with booming economies now.

PS My great, great, great, great grandfather served as a coal miner from the age of 7 until his retirement aged 80 and holds the world record for longest serving coal miner, service lasting 73 years. His name was David Davies and his portrait hung in a museum in Moscow (!?) presumably a tribute by the socialist authorities.

And boomers think they've got it hard . . . . .

he WAS a boomer wasn't he? cponsidering they all worked 100 hours a day during the industrial revolution and fought in 2 world wars - often dying on several occasions - I'd have thought you would be more greatful to today's 45 to 65 somethings...

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What do you mean 'revealed'?

Might as well 'reveal' that Henry VIII had Anne Boleyn's head chopped off.

+1

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Wow!! Professor "reveals" that cheap labour boosts profits.

Well I never, what next.

That'll really "transform" peoples understanding.

How much taxpayers money did it take for the Professor to come up with that so called "revelation".

How many young students had to go into £thousands of fee debt to subsidise it.

Edited by billybong

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And its powering economies with booming economies now.

PS My great, great, great, great grandfather served as a coal miner from the age of 7 until his retirement aged 80 and holds the world record for longest serving coal miner, service lasting 73 years. His name was David Davies and his portrait hung in a museum in Moscow (!?) presumably a tribute by the socialist authorities.

And boomers think they've got it hard . . . . .

My late great grandfather used to do some bare knuckle boxing for cash "better then working down the mine"

God bless the computer !

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The work is likely to transform the academic world's understanding of that crucial period of British history which was the launch-pad of the nation's economic and imperial power.Early factory owners – located in the countryside in order to exploit power from fast-flowing rivers – found that local labour was scarce and that those agricultural workers who were available were unsuitable for industrial production.

"found that local labour was scarce and that those agricultural workers who were available were unsuitable for industrial production."

"Unsuitable" - not cheap enough. Can't wait for the next taxpayer/student loan funded "revelation" from these Professors.

Edited by billybong

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Wow!!  Professor "reveals" that cheap labour boosts profits.

Well I never, what next.  

That'll really "transform" peoples understanding.

How much taxpayers money did it take for the Professor to come up with that so called "revelation".  

How many young students had to go into £thousands of fee debt to subsidise it.

None. Research funding subsidises teaching, not the other way round. I realise this contradicts "common sense" and 99% of the commentary you've ever read or heard about this issue but that is the fact of the matter.

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how shocking to hear that capitalism is powered by slave or exploited labour.

of course global capitalism is powered by slave (child and adult) in various developing and third world countries.

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Something I heard which has always stuck with me, the driving force behind much of the industrial revolution was the salaries paid to British workers being some 10 times that of their Continental counterparts, hence much of the driving force behind automation.

Something you heard or something you could back up for the sceptics and enquiring minds. Yes it is feasible that new industries may privide higher salaries than traditional agrarian ones (we see this constantly in developing economies), but on a scale of 10 times, in the same economic area, seems unlikely.

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None. Research funding subsidises teaching, not the other way round. I realise this contradicts "common sense" and 99% of the commentary you've ever read or heard about this issue but that is the fact of the matter.

There's subsidising between research funding and taxpayers/student loan money one way or another along the line and the line between research and day to day work can blur. Of course Professors research costs won't show up in the actual books as such under "money taken from taxpayers and students in paying off their government loans" etc but it's inevitably there with governmen/tax payer funding and grants and so on and all the different organisations and companies relying on government/tax payer money as well as the money paid by students as well as direct grants. Probably most if not all of it of it is ultimately taxpayer money and money from students although the route can at times be circuitous.

And what do they come up with - cheap labour boosts profits. Tell that to the students and graduates flipping burgers and so on.

Edited by billybong

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They did. Glasgow in the 20's, not a pleasant place to live.

The average life expectancy was around 30 years in many heavy industrial areas.

"Due to public health measures the percentage of children born in London who died before the age of five decreased from 74.5% in 1730-1749 to 31.8% in 1810-1829."

Wonderful - 'they' decided at that point to improve public health, to produce more slaves to enrich them further!

The Industrial revolution was dreamt up by some toffs - in the 'Black' country - Staffs!

Do you really know why we presently have a COAL_ition during this unprecedented upheaval?

The toffs have something 'special' lined up for you!

J. R. R. Tolkien based the grim region of Mordor on the heavily industrialised Black Country area in his famed novel The Lord of the Rings. Indeed, in the Elvish Sindarin language, Mor-Dor means Dark (or Black) Land, and is sometimes even referred to within the novel as "The Black Country".

Charles Dickens's novel The Old Curiosity Shop, written in 1841, described how the area's local factory chimneys "Poured out their plague of smoke, obscured the light, and made foul the melancholy air".

The anchors and chains for the ill-fated liner RMS Titanic were manufactured in the Black Country in the area of Netherton. (Occult)Three anchors and accompanying chains were manufactured; and the set weighed in at 100 tons.

Netherton means "lower farm" Netherton's parish church is St Andrew's!

Edited by erranta

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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