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Buffer Bear

Converting Power

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Mods, please can this post be left for a little while as it probably won't get picked up in "off topic" etc.

If anyone can help me out on this, it would be really appreciated as I simply am not techie minded.

As a last resort, I will need to buy a cheap netbook to use while on holiday (still enquiring amongst friends out there if they can loan me one.)Currently work is saved on a flash drive / memory stick / laptop / PC (yes I am very paranoid about losing my work :)using XP professional. Only need to use MS word which I have been told by Currys is on Office, Home and Student and comes as a free trial on an HP netbook they sell. What convertor / transformer will I need to buy to use this in Barbados and where can this be purchased?

Can't afford to 'waste' three weeks without studying when on holiday. Other half is not too impressed but I am under pressure to complete...

Many thanks,

If I get a response soon, I will purchase the netbook today as I need this one out of the way.

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They use American style plugs and sockets.

However, the actual power is a weird unique hybrid of British and American. For laptops and phones - this is not a problem - modern laptops, netbooks, mobiles, digicam chargers, etc. will run on practically anything, as long as its electricity. (Check your charging adaptor - it will usually say something like "voltage 90 - 270 V" to indicate it's acceptable range. As long as it covers the 110-120 V used in Barbados you'll be fine).

It's more of a problem for things like cheap alarm clocks, TVs, etc. (E.g. UK/EUro clocks won't run because the voltage is wrong. US clocks will run, but won't keep time because the frequency is wrong).

Voltage converters generally aren't necessary for modern electronics. But do check that your devices all accept the 110 V supply (it'll be written on them). You can get converters, but they are expensive, heavy and very limited in capability - by and large they're not worth it, unless your appliance absolutely must be brought with you, and does not accept 110 V electricity.

Edited by ChumpusRex

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If all else fails, depending on how soon you are going, you could probably pick up a localised PSU on ebay.

Or just buy the netbook when you get there.

I think MS now offer web-based versions of office, or you could use google office.

Be sure to back your files up to your skydrive account before you fy.

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99% of note books have a separate power adaptor type thing, which is external to the notebook. Just buy a local one and it should change it to the DC needed by your machine.

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According to Wikipedia, the Barbados mains supply is 115V at 50Hz using USA/Canadian style 2- and 3-pin plugs

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_power_around_the_world

and as ChumpusRex says, the frequency is 50Hz, not 60Hz, so not *exactly* the same as in USA but that’s not a problem for most things, including laptops that use an AC converter (the small black thingy that goes between the mains AC plug and the low voltage DC plug into the laptop).

1) Check that the AC adapter is happy to accept 115V at 50Hz, it will say on it.

2) If so, then you just need to swap the power cord to a 2- or 3-pin USA style one. The laptop manufacturer will usually sell a travel kit with different plug options, etc.

Here's the AC adapter from my laptop (look at the green label) Input 100V-240V 50/60 Hz AC, Output 16V DC.

25u7lag.png

Edited by spline

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Pretty much every modern laptop power supply is switched mode, and they swallow pretty much any input voltage, per the picture above. They're fairly efficient, and cheaper for the manufacturer to have one power supply for the world.

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Yellerkat, ChumpusRex, mmm....beer, TaxAbuserOfTheWeek, and ken ichikawa, spline, piece of paper and exe (sorry just added you guys as I had not seen your comments). Will read now.

Thank you all very much for your assistance!

I have now bought a Packard Bell dot S2. It has a cord and I have to connect / snap on the 3 point plug (for UK use). The plug says "input 100-240v." Can I simple buy a travel adaptor plug to stick on the end to make it 2 pin or am I being too simplistic?

And TAOFTW, what do you mean by "Be sure to back your files up to your skydrive account before you fy." What is a skydrive account? Yes I know I am being lazy but want to go to bed as work early tomorrow but I still have lots of prep to do. Haven't even ironed my work clothes yet. Can't I just carry my portable HD and memory stick or are you alluding to the flight potentially interfering with the data??

Thanks for any help

Edited by Buffer Bear

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable

Just get whatever funny looking plug they have for there and use the one that comes with it.

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According to Wikipedia, the Barbados mains supply is 115V at 50Hz using USA/Canadian style 2- and 3-pin plugs

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_power_around_the_world

and as ChumpusRex says, the frequency is 50Hz, not 60Hz, so not *exactly* the same as in USA but that’s not a problem for most things, including laptops that use an AC converter (the small black thingy that goes between the mains AC plug and the low voltage DC plug into the laptop).

1) Check that the AC adapter is happy to accept 115V at 50Hz, it will say on it.

2) If so, then you just need to swap the power cord to a 2- or 3-pin USA style one. The laptop manufacturer will usually sell a travel kit with different plug options, etc.

Here's the AC adapter from my laptop (look at the green label) Input 100V-240V 50/60 Hz AC, Output 16V DC.

25u7lag.png

That's very kind and helpful of you to post the image.

Mine says Input 100v-240v and 50 / 60Hz.

"If so, then you just need to swap the power cord to a 2- or 3-pin USA style one" Do you mean stick a travel type 'adaptor' on the three pins? Sorry for being thick!

Edited by Buffer Bear

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I have now bought a Packard Bell dot S2. It has a cord and I have to connect / snap on the 3 point plug (for UK use). The plug says "input 100-240v." Can I simple buy a travel adaptor plug to stick on the end to make it 2 pin or am I being too simplistic?

I think so - alternative to using a travel adapter is also to buy a new separate power cord in the country you arrive in - the one that goes FROM the mains wall socket INTO the power pack, should connect via standard clover-leaf plug into power-pack. In Tandy, Radio Shack, local electrical store, whatever.

no idea what a skydrive account is...

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I think so - alternative to using a travel adapter is also to buy a new separate power cord in the country you arrive in - the one that goes FROM the mains wall socket INTO the power pack, should connect via standard clover-leaf plug into power-pack. In Tandy, Radio Shack, local electrical store, whatever.

no idea what a skydrive account is...

Thanks Si1. Never crossed my mind to consider this. Well at least I have a couple of options now. I was getting to the point where I was considering buying another netbook when I landed in Barbados :rolleyes::unsure::o

Thanks all.

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I have now bought a Packard Bell dot S2. It has a cord and I have to connect / snap on the 3 point plug (for UK use). The plug says "input 100-240v." Can I simple buy a travel adaptor plug to stick on the end to make it 2 pin or am I being too simplistic?

The Packardbell charger looks like it has a removable/rotatable plug as part of the AC Adaper – so probably difficult to swap unless you can get hold of the Packard Bell USA plug. However, a standard travel plug adapter (USA, 2 flat pins) should work fine.

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The Packardbell charger looks like it has a removable/rotatable plug as part of the AC Adaper – so probably difficult to swap unless you can get hold of the Packard Bell USA plug. However, a standard travel plug adapter (USA, 2 flat pins) should work fine.

"Looks like it has a removable/rotatable plug as part of the AC Adapter." Yes it does.

a standard travel plug adapter (USA, 2 flat pins) should work fine. Excellent.

Thank you so much for your help.

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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