Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
The Masked Tulip

Jobless Total In Wales ‘Could Double’

Recommended Posts

I suspect this is as true for Scotland and the North of England as Wales. Add in the PS job cuts.

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/2010/08/01/jobless-total-in-wales-could-double-91466-26972217/

THE number of unemployed people in Wales could almost double once a Government scheme to reassess everyone on incapacity benefit begins.

There are plans to begin re-evaluating the ability to work of everyone claiming the benefit from October. New applicants are already being assessed for the Employment and Support Allowance, which will replace incapacity benefit, with 39% found to be fit to work. If this rate was repeated with those who are currently on incapacity benefit, the number of Welsh jobseekers could jump 83%, from 68,900 to 126,000, higher than anywhere else in the UK.

Some areas are likely to be harder hit than others – Ceredigion may be facing a 135% increase and Bridgend, Carmarthenshire, Neath Port Talbot, Powys and Rhondda Cynon Taff may all see numbers double or more.

A spokesperson for the Department of Work and Pensions said it has an obligation to help people get job-ready, while responsibility for encouraging economic growth lies with other departments.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect this is as true for Scotland and the North of England as Wales. Add in the PS job cuts.

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/2010/08/01/jobless-total-in-wales-could-double-91466-26972217/

A spokesperson for the Department of Work and Pensions said it has an obligation to help people get job-ready, while responsibility for encouraging economic growth lies with other departments.

"So there I was Dai, job ready and knowing everything that there is to know about a V5 registration document, and then he tells me to build a ******ing coracle."

p-o-p

Edited by piece of paper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes very good idear, Get People Job Ready

Then the next thing to do is find the jobs for them , that's the bit they have not worked out how to do yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest absolutezero

Yes very good idear, Get People Job Ready

Then the next thing to do is find the jobs for them , that's the bit they have not worked out how to do yet.

"NorthernWelsh unemployment is a price worth paying to curb Southern inflation".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I suspect this is as true for Scotland and the North of England as Wales. Add in the PS job cuts.

Whilst this particular fiddle makes my stomach heave, please be aware of the true rationale here (hint, vote-buying is only a tangential benefit).

Incapacity benefit has kept the UK's statistics (in the OECD sense) of unemployment held artificially low - this has been standing policy and an open (albeit sick) secret for much of this most regrettable of decades (ie, the entirety of the previous parliamentry terms - it's been a keystone of the "Nu" policy, statistical fiddling while the real economy burned).

Once this open, weeping sore is finally cauterised (and here I get to the point of my response) the OECD stats will leap and UK gilts will soften accordingly (forecast of GDP growth in the short and mid-dateds will slump to reflect the actuality of the real data series, killing yields in the process).

Please reposition accordingly if you haven't already....

... the blue-sky scenario here is that our numbers will be less worse, and just slightly later in the cycle than much of the Eurozone...

(One wonders what the "rightsizing" of the public sector will do in these same constituencies, if this is the extent of state support to the unemployed)

Edited by ParticleMan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(One wonders what the "rightsizing" of the public sector will do in these same constituencies, if this is the extent of state support to the unemployed)

They will become economic black holes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some time back I seem to remember the JV show on radio 2 stating that in % terms, there are more PS workers in Wales than there were in Communist Czechoslovakia!!!

It cant go on much longer .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Incapacity benefit has kept the UK's statistics (in the OECD sense) of unemployment held artificially low - this has been standing policy and an open (albeit sick) secret for much of this most regrettable of decades (ie, the entirety of the previous parliamentry terms - it's been a keystone of the "Nu" policy, statistical fiddling while the real economy burned).

Once this open, weeping sore is finally cauterised (and here I get to the point of my response) the OECD stats will leap and UK gilts will soften accordingly (forecast of GDP growth in the short and mid-dateds will slump to reflect the actuality of the real data series, killing yields in the process).

Please reposition accordingly if you haven't already....

Well yeah....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some time back I seem to remember the JV show on radio 2 stating that in % terms, there are more PS workers in Wales than there were in Communist Czechoslovakia!!!

It cant go on much longer .

Please come here and witness the complete lack of any sign of a recession here. Either everyone has been told their PS jobs are safe or it is going to be one heck of a shock for them when the cuts are finally announced.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect this is as true for Scotland and the North of England as Wales. Add in the PS job cuts.

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/2010/08/01/jobless-total-in-wales-could-double-91466-26972217/

Mail says that house prices will rise 4% this year. National shortage don't you know? What about building some more, that puts people back to work. It's a very good idea-why hasn't anybody thought of it?

Now where can I borrow the money to build some? Anybody on here want to J/V with me?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please come here and witness the complete lack of any sign of a recession here. Either everyone has been told their PS jobs are safe or it is going to be one heck of a shock for them when the cuts are finally announced.

Perhaps they are looking forward to an early retirement?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I overhead an anecdotal today at a Welsh boot sale. A Welsh lady had debts of £60,000 on a hair dressing salon business. She also had 40,000 pounds of debt on credit cards.

She wiped out the debts by going bankrupt a year ago. She said creditors had found out that she had inherited money for a house from her late father, so they took this money.

She was telling her friend what an enormous weight it was that had been lifted, and that it was all over in only a year :rolleyes:

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect this is as true for Scotland and the North of England as Wales. Add in the PS job cuts.

http://www.walesonli...91466-26972217/

Misleading headline (not yours, the article's). The affected individuals are already jobless, they're just being reclassified. Good thing too: we need transparency and honesty, not obfuscation and lies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes very good idear, Get People Job Ready

Then the next thing to do is find the jobs for them , that's the bit they have not worked out how to do yet.

Not only find the jobs but find the employers who are prepared to take on someone with a long term sickness and/or disability.

Simply saying someone is fit for work doesn't mean that their disability goes away, it just means that they do not meet the stricter criteria.

Many of the people moved to JSA will be disabled under the meaning of the Disability Discrimination Act. It doesn't mean that employers, including those in the Public Sector (as if they had jobs to offer now) will even consider them.

Cynical and nasty cost cutting. The same old....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not only find the jobs but find the employers who are prepared to take on someone with a long term sickness and/or disability.

Simply saying someone is fit for work doesn't mean that their disability goes away, it just means that they do not meet the stricter criteria.

Many of the people moved to JSA will be disabled under the meaning of the Disability Discrimination Act. It doesn't mean that employers, including those in the Public Sector (as if they had jobs to offer now) will even consider them.

Cynical and nasty cost cutting. The same old....

Using the Welsh example, why are there a disproportionate number of disabled Welsh people vs. the UK?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest absolutezero

I thought there wasn't any inflation?

That's not what recent RPI figures suggest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not only find the jobs but find the employers who are prepared to take on someone with a long term sickness and/or disability.

Simply saying someone is fit for work doesn't mean that their disability goes away, it just means that they do not meet the stricter criteria.

Many of the people moved to JSA will be disabled under the meaning of the Disability Discrimination Act. It doesn't mean that employers, including those in the Public Sector (as if they had jobs to offer now) will even consider them.

Cynical and nasty cost cutting. The same old....

Yep agreed 100%

What really annoyes me is that the ordinary people did not create this mess , yet those people will be paying and those at the bottom will be paying the most.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought there wasn't any inflation?

When it comes to payrises there is no inflation for every thing else there is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Using the Welsh example, why are there a disproportionate number of disabled Welsh people vs. the UK?

To answer as objectively as I can, I think that it is the result of heavy industry, low educational attainment (yes, I know there are wonderful exceptions) a natural inclination to boozing and obesity and relative poverty. There is an unarguable connection between high wealth and good health.

I think that Scotland too has a high level of disability claimants for the same reasons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To answer as objectively as I can, I think that it is the result of heavy industry, low educational attainment (yes, I know there are wonderful exceptions) a natural inclination to boozing and obesity and relative poverty. There is an unarguable connection between high wealth and good health.

I think that Scotland too has a high level of disability claimants for the same reasons.

What he said.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A spokesperson for the Department of Work and Pensions said it has an obligation to help people get job-ready, while responsibility for encouraging economic growth lies with other departments.

Many of these people were actively encouraged to take on the status of disabled as an effort to disguise the real unemployment total in the time of Thatcher and this trend continued under subsequent governments. This became a self fulfilling prophecy as those involved became effectively trapped economically in the role of 'disabled'

Now it has become politically expedient to reverse this policy and redefine them as 'not disabled' this is both true and false- it's true that in the first instance many of these people were never truly incapacitated, however their long period of being treated as such has effectively rendered them unemployable.

To pretend that they can be made 'job ready' by the simple process of relabelling them as 'fit for work' is a cynical distortion of the truth.

But since the cost of offering real training and help to these people will far outweigh the cost of leaving them as they are, the cheap option will be to 'rebrand' them as viable job candidates and pretend they will get jobs. So that is what will be done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many of these people were actively encouraged to take on the status of disabled as an effort to disguise the real unemployment total in the time of Thatcher and this trend continued under subsequent governments. This became a self fulfilling prophecy as those involved became effectively trapped economically in the role of 'disabled'

Now it has become politically expedient to reverse this policy and redefine them as 'not disabled' this is both true and false- it's true that in the first instance many of these people were never truly incapacitated, however their long period of being treated as such has effectively rendered them unemployable.

To pretend that they can be made 'job ready' by the simple process of relabelling them as 'fit for work' is a cynical distortion of the truth.

But since the cost of offering real training and help to these people will far outweigh the cost of leaving them as they are, the cheap option will be to 'rebrand' them as viable job candidates and pretend they will get jobs. So that is what will be done.

And Ian Duncan Smith who has done loads of work on this is also going to make it easier for them to move for work. So they can move form one unemployment blackspot to another , as most if not all of the country is an unemployment black spot now for anyone who losses their job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 153 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.